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Patch Adams (1998) Poster

(1998)

Trivia

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During filming, Robin Williams and the rest of the cast and crew worked closely with the Make-A-Wish Foundation to fulfill the fantasies of several children who were at the time undergoing cancer treatment. The children appeared with Williams in scenes at the pediatric ward.
While the real Patch Adams made a brief cameo in the film, he "hated" the film and the portrayal of himself.
Filmed partially at the University of North Carolina. Robin Williams did stand up comedy for some classes that were in session while filming.
In 2014, co-stars Philip Seymour Hoffman and Robin Williams died within nearly six months of each other.
One of the film's producers, Mike Farrell, met the real Patch Adams when Adams served as an advisor to the TV series M*A*S*H (1972), in which Farrell played B.J. Hunnicutt, one of the Army doctors.
Patch Adams said that whenever the film's production would get stressful, Robin Williams would improvise a set to make the cast and crew laugh.
Patch's (Robin Williams) roommate in the mental hospital is played by Michael Jeter. In The Fisher King (1991), Jeter also played an insane companion of Williams'.
The poem that Patch reads to Carin is an English translation of "Sonnet XVII" by Pablo Neruda.
Richard Kiley's final film.
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The song "Faith of the Heart" performed in this film by Rod Stewart, was later used as theme song of Star Trek: Enterprise (2001).
When Dean Walcott is walking down the hall, right before he enters the room where Patch is playing with the hospital bed, there is a page that comes over the intercom for Dr. Maslow to dial 214. Dr. Abraham Maslow, noted psychologist, developed the "Hierarchy of Needs" that explains how the personality reacts to environmental factors and needs.
The fifth time Robin Williams has played a doctor in the space of nine years, after Awakenings (1990), Nine Months (1995), Good Will Hunting (1997), and What Dreams May Come (1998).
Patch Adams is shown as being one of the highest testing students in the school, yet he is never seen studying, even when he is at the study table with his colleagues.
Michael Jeter, who plays the unstable mental patient, Rudy, went on to play a mentally unstable prisoner on death row in the movie "The Green Mile" (1999).
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When Patch is bothering his classmates with the anatomical skeleton he makes a joke about the "Donner Party." This is a historical reference to the Donner Party, a group of wagon train pioneers who left for California in 1846 and became stuck in the Sierra Nevada mountain range during the winter after an early November snow fall made the trip through impossible until the spring. When food supplies ran out, some of the group resorted to cannibalism to make it through the winter. Of the original 87 members, only 48 survived and reached California.
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After Patch catches up to Carin when she has stormed out of the study group, he makes a reference to Walt Whitman. In Dead Poets' Society, Walt Whitman is the favorite poet of Mr. Keating (also played by Robin Williams).
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Cameo 

Patch Adams: The real Patch Adams appears in the scene where the medical school staff returns with the verdict. He sits right behind Robin Williams.

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

In real life, Patch's close friend who was murdered was a man, not a female love interest. Carin is a fictional character.
Monica Potter performed her final audition for her role in Robin Williams' house in front of his wife. Although riddled with flu at the time, Potter still had to play out an intimate kissing scene.

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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