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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004

1-20 of 40 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The New World,’ ‘Sing Street,’ African-American Cinema and More

26 July 2016 6:22 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The New World (Terrence Malick)

Terrence Malick is a filmmaker who has always valued photogenic artistry over narrative thrust, content to let his stories and characters wash over the audience like a crashing wave. There are few directors who indulge in such visual splendor, his creative aphorism seemingly being beauty for the sake of beauty. For Lubezki’s first collaboration with the director, The New World, it was also an opportunity for him to shoot (at least partially) on 65mm. »

- The Film Stage

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Brad Bird On Why “Video Games Are A Bad influence For Storytelling”

22 July 2016 1:30 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Brad Bird (The Incredibles, Ratatouille) came to San Diego Comic-Con International 2016 for a preview of The Giant’s Dream: The Making Of The Iron Giant, which will be included on the upcoming Blu-ray release of the film this fall. The documentary by Anthony Giacchino is a beautiful and heartbreaking look at the Hollywood animation process, a […]

The post Brad Bird On Why “Video Games Are A Bad influence For Storytelling” appeared first on /Film. »

- Peter Sciretta

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‘The Iron Giant’: Brad Bird’s Anti-Gun Violence Movie Gains Poignant Power in New Documentary

22 July 2016 1:22 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

What if a gun had a soul and didn’t want to be a gun?”

This was the question Brad Bird posed when he first encountered “The Iron Giant,” and that was the pitch to Warner Bros. that landed the student of animation his first feature directing gig.

Though the film flopped upon release in 1999, “The Iron Giant” has gained a second life (and a third, fourth, fifth…) in the years following thanks to avid critical and fan support. And on Friday morning at Comic-Con, a new documentary premiered highlighting the rich history of a once-forgotten film — that’s all the more meaningful today.

Bird introduced  “The Giant’s Dream: The Making of The Iron Giant,” noting, “It’s easy to forget what it was like to make […] because this was a moment in time that was very unique.”

Read More: ‘The Iron Giant’: Brad Bird’s Anti-Gun Violence »

- Ben Travers

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‘RiffTrax 10 Year Highlight Reel’: Relive the Gang’s Best Post-‘MST3K’ Moments

22 July 2016 9:06 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

This week RiffTrax is celebrating ten years of its life on the web. To celebrate, comedians Michael J. Nelson, Kevin Murphy, Bill Corbett and the whole team created a “RiffTrax 10 Year Highlight Reel” for their loyal fans to enjoy.  

“It was hard to condense 10 years of making movies funny into just six minutes, but we think we did it,” said the RiffTrax team online.

For those unfamiliar with RiffTrax, they are hilarious commentaries added to blockbuster movies, short films, TV shows and cheesy B-movies, all created by the stars of the Mystery Science Theater 3000 or better known as MST3K.

Read More: ‘Batman v Superman’ Honest Trailer Pokes Fun At The Film That Didn’t Bring ‘Justice’ to Either Hero

Shown during the MST3K Reunion Show, this highlight reel includes some of the group’s favorite jokes from riffs they did in the past. The six-minute video includes scenes from “The Lord of The Rings, »

- Liz Calvario

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Sing Street,’ ‘A Touch of Zen,’ ‘To Have and Have Not,’ and More

19 July 2016 8:51 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Night & Fog (Alain Resnais)

Ten years after the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps, filmmaker Alain Resnais documented the abandoned grounds of Auschwitz and Majdanek in Night and Fog (Nuit et brouillard), one of the first cinematic reflections on the Holocaust. Juxtaposing the stillness of the abandoned camps’ empty buildings with haunting wartime footage, Resnais investigates humanity’s capacity for violence, and presents the devastating suggestion that such horrors could occur again. – Criterion

Sing Street (John Carney)

Returning »

- The Film Stage

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The 20 Best Voice Performances of the Last 20 Years

13 July 2016 11:03 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Movies’ voice performances used to be something of an afterthought, at least for audiences. Most people have seen “The Little Mermaid,” but few could tell you the name of the actress who breathed life into Ariel. (Her name is Jodie Benson.)

That’s changed. Dreamworks and the growing legion of Disney imitators realized there was real commercial value in casting celebrities for animated movies. (See: Martin Scorsese as a fish with huge eyebrows in “Shark Tale.”) And, as technology developed a life of its own, the sound of a recognizable human voice has grown especially comforting.

These days, we don’t need to call anyone to have a conversation with our phones. And yet, even in an age when computers can generate photorealistic people, the fully human voice is still inimitable. It’s safe to say that Siri has never made anybody cry (unless it was frustration), but Scarlett Johansson »

- David Ehrlich, Kate Halliwell, Steve Greene, Russell Goldman, Ben Travers, Zack Sharf, Chris O'Falt and Kyle Kizu

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Green Room,’ ‘Everybody Want Some!!,’ ‘My Golden Days’ & More

12 July 2016 7:26 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Belladonna of Sadness (Eiichi Yamamoto)

It all begins with Once Upon a Time. Such a simple introduction for Belladonna of Sadness, a 1973 Japanese animated feature whose newfound legacy includes a decades-long disappearance, a dramatic re-emergence, and a growing reputation as a frenzied, pornographic freakout. The final entry in anime elder statesman Osamu Tezuka‘s erotic Animerama trilogy has remained largely unknown to even the most die-hard cult cinephiles, a fate determined after its commercial failure bankrupted Tezuka’s production company, »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Only Yesterday,’ ‘The In-Laws,’ ‘Boy & the World’ & More

5 July 2016 8:35 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Boy & the World (Alê Abreu)

Crayon-like scribblings and simple geometric patterns meticulously complicate themselves like a fractal over the course of this child’s-eye odyssey through the global struggle between humankind and the forces that oppress it. Kaleidoscopic visuals use repetition to explore the communal nature of both work and celebration. This film continually pulls back to show the larger picture of society, its visuals becoming more complex in kind, before it reduces to a more intimate view »

- The Film Stage

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‘Don’t Worry Baby’ Exclusive Trailer: Father & Son Discover One Of Them Has Fathered The Child of a One Night Stand

29 June 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Don’t Worry Baby” follows struggling photographer Robert (John Magaro) and his philandering father Harry (Christopher McDonald) as they learn they both had a one-night stand with the same woman, Sarah-Beth (Dreama Walker). Years later, they realize that one of them is the father of Sarah-Beth’s four-year-old daughter.

While they wait for a paternity test, they both decide to assume fatherly duties and soon learn to connect and mend their rocky relationship. The film also stars Tom Lipinski (“Suits”) as Robert’s friend Lenny and Talia Balsam (“Mad Men”) as Robert’s mother and Harry’s ex-wife. Watch the exclusive trailer for the film below.

Read More: Here’s How This First-Time Director Shot A Feature Film in New York City

The film is the feature-length directorial debut of Julian Branciforte, who previously acted in Antonio Campos’ “Afterschool” and directed the shorts “The Necessary Defilement »

- Vikram Murthi

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Dr. Strangelove,’ ‘Clouds of Sils Maria,’ ‘Cemetery of Splendor,’ and More

28 June 2016 7:31 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Cemetery of Splendor (Apichatpong Weerasethakul)

If it is by now redundant to say that Thai filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul (who understands pronunciation troubles and insists people call him “Joe”) is truly in a class of his own, we might blame both the general excellence of his output — a large oeuvre consisting of features, shorts, and installations — and the difficulty that’s often associated with describing them in either literal or opinion-based terms. The further one gets into his work, »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Knight of Cups,’ ‘Midnight Special,’ ‘Embrace of the Serpent,’ and More

21 June 2016 7:56 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Embrace of the Serpent (Ciro Guerra)

With its focus on the effects of exploration by white men on foreign lands, Ciro Guerra’s Oscar-nominated Embrace of the Serpent will inevitably be compared to Werner Herzog’s stories of savage nature, and while Guerra is investigating some of Herzog’s most well trodden themes, the chaos of man exists in the background, while the unspoiled sit front and center here. Embrace of the Serpent centers on two explorers, separated by decades in time, »

- The Film Stage

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Jennifer Aniston is joining Key and Peele in ‘Storks’

15 June 2016 12:17 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The cast of Storks has found a new Friend. Jennifer Aniston is among the voice cast for the upcoming animated movie, EW reported. She’ll play the mother of an only child who really wants a baby brother. The movie is about a workaholic bird trying to find the right home for an “unauthorized” baby girl who was born when a stork (Andy Samberg) accidentally activated the Baby Making Machine. Storks writer/co-director Nicholas Stoller told EW the film is “a love letter to parenthood,” inspired by his experiences raising two girls. Also lending their voices to Storks are Kelsey Grammer, Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele, Ty Burrell, and Katie Crown. You can see what Aniston’s mom character looks like in the image below, along with her animated movie husband, Ty Burrell: It won’t be the first time the Friends alum has voiced the mother of an animated character — she supplied the voice of Hogarth’s mom in The Iron Giant. Storks opens in theaters on September 23, 2016. »

- Emily Rome

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ’10 Cloverfield Lane, ’45 Years,’ ‘La Chienne,’ and More

14 June 2016 6:43 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

10 Cloverfield Lane (Dan Trachtenberg)

Forget the Cloverfield connection. The actors who were in this film didn’t even know what the title was until moments before the first trailer dropped. Producer J.J. Abrams used that branding as part of the wrapping for its promotional mystery box, but the movie stands perfectly alone from 2008’s found-footage monster picture. Hell, 10 Cloverfield Lane perhaps doesn’t even take place within the same fictional universe as that film — although a friend asked if it’s secretly a Super 8 sequel, and, honestly, you could think of it as one without contradicting anything in either movie. Whether the Cloverfield name fills you with wariness or enthusiasm, it would be unwise to burden Dan Trachtenberg‘s film with such prejudices. – Dan S. (full review)

45 Years (Andrew Haigh)

Andrew Haigh’s third feature as a director, 45 Years, is an excellent companion piece to its 2011 predecessor, Weekend. The latter examined the inception of a potential relationship between two men over the course of a weekend, whereas its successor considers the opposite extreme. Again sticking to a tight timeframe, the film chronicles the six days leading up to a couple’s 45th wedding anniversary. Though highly accomplished, Weekend nevertheless suffered from a tendency towards commenting on itself as a gay issues film, which at times overrode the otherwise compelling realism. Despite treating material arguably even more underrepresented in cinema – senior relationships – Haigh avoids this same self-reflexive pitfall in 45 Years, pulling off an incisive and emotionally ensnaring tour de force. – Giovanni M.C. (full review)

Here Comes Mr. Jordan (Alexander Hall)

A sophisticated supernatural Hollywood comedy whose influence continues to be felt, Here Comes Mr. Jordan stars the eminently versatile Robert Montgomery as a working-class boxer and amateur aviator whose plane crashes in a freak accident. He finds himself in heaven but is told, by a wry angel named Mr. Jordan (Claude Rains), that his death was a clerical error, and that he can return to Earth by entering the body of a corrupt (and about-to-be-murdered) financier—whose soul could use a transplant. Nominated for seven Oscars (it won two) and the inspiration for a sequel with Rita Hayworth and two remakes, Alexander Hall’s effervescent Here Comes Mr. Jordan is comic perfection. – Criterion.com

La Chienne (Jean Renoir)

Jean Renoir’s ruthless love triangle tale, his second sound film, is a true precursor to his brilliantly bitter The Rules of the Game, displaying all of the filmmaker’s visual genius and fully imbued with his profound humanity. Michel Simon cuts a tragic figure as an unhappily married cashier and amateur painter who becomes so smitten with a prostitute that he refuses to see the obvious: that she and her pimp boyfriend are taking advantage of him. Renoir’s elegant compositions and camera movements carry this twisting narrative—a stinging commentary on class and sexual divisions—to an unforgettably ironic conclusion. – Criterion.com

Also Arriving This Week

Eddie the Eagle (review)

Hello, My Name is Doris (review)

Get a Job (review)

Gold

Recommended Deals of the Week

Top Deal: A selection of Clint Eastwood and Steven Spielberg Blu-rays are under $10 this week.

All the President’s Men (Blu-ray) – $7.79

The American (Blu-ray) – $6.68

Amelie (Blu-ray) – $8.99

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Beginners (Blu-ray) – $6.11

Bone Tomahawk (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Brothers Bloom (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Cabin in the Woods (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Casino (Blu-ray) – $9.49

The Conformist (Blu-ray) – $14.49

Cloud Atlas (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Crimson Peak (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Dear White People (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Deer Hunter (Blu-ray) – $10.61

Eastern Promises (Blu-ray) – $8.57

Ex Machina (Blu-ray) – $8.00

The Grand Budapest Hotel (Blu-ray) – $5.99

The Guest (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Hail, Caesar! (Blu-ray) – $12.99

Heat (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Holy Motors (Blu-ray) – $10.59

The Informant! (Blu-ray) – $8.07

Inglorious Basterds (Blu-ray) – $4.99

Interstellar (Blu-ray) – $5.00

The Iron Giant (Blu-ray pre-order) – $9.99

Jaws (Blu-ray) – $7.88

John Wick (Blu-ray) – $8.00

Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (Blu-ray) – $9.69

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter (Blu-ray) – $9.89

The Lady From Shanghai (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Looper (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Lost In Translation (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Macbeth (Blu-ray) – $11.99

Mad Max: Fury Road (Blu-ray) – $10.00

Magic Mike Xxl (Blu-ray) – $11.99

Magnolia (Blu-ray) – $9.19

The Man Who Wasn’t There (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Margaret (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Martha Marcy May Marlene (Blu-ray) – $6.99

The Master (Blu-ray) – $12.69

Michael Clayton (Blu-ray) – $7.98

Nebraska (Blu-ray) – $9.35

Never Let Me Go (Blu-ray) – $7.99

No Country For Old Men (Blu-ray) – $5.99

Non-Stop (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Obvious Child (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Pan’s Labyrinth (Blu-ray) – $7.99

ParaNorman (Blu-ray) – $7.98

Pariah (Blu-ray) – $9.98

Persepolis (Blu-ray) – $5.79

Prisoners (Blu-ray) – $10.49

Pulp Fiction (Blu-ray) – $8.48

Raging Bull: 30th Anniversary Edition (Blu-ray) – $10.19

Re-Animator (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Rio Bravo (Blu-ray) – $5.99

Road to Perdition (Blu-ray) – $8.99

The Searchers / Wild Bunch / How the West Was Won (Blu-ray) – $10.36

Sex, Lies, and Videotape (Blu-ray) – $5.88

Short Term 12 (Blu-ray) – $9.89

Shutter Island (Blu-ray) – $6.79

A Separation (Blu-ray) – $6.80

A Serious Man (Blu-ray) – $7.22

A Single Man (Blu-ray) – $6.00

The Social Network (Blu-ray) – $9.96

Spotlight (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Steve Jobs (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Straight Outta Compton (Blu-ray) – $10.00

Synecdoche, NY (Blu-ray) – $6.89

There Will Be Blood (Blu-ray) – $8.20

They Came Together (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Tree of Life (Blu-ray) – $6.99

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (Blu-ray) – $5.52

Volver (Blu-ray) – $5.95

Where the Wild Things Are (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Whiplash (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Witch (Blu-ray) – $14.96

The Wrestler (Blu-ray) – $7.00

See all Blu-ray deals.

What are you picking up this week?

»

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Hail, Caesar!,’ ‘Anomalisa,’ ‘Le Amiche,’ and More

7 June 2016 6:38 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Anomalisa (Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson)

Charlie Kaufman, the writer behind Being John Malkovich and Adaptation, teams up with animator Duke Johnson to create a complex emotional drama starring lifelike puppets. The premise is riddled with existential dread of modern-day life, presented uniquely through Kaufman’s idiosyncratic point-of-view. For protagonist and self-help author Michael Stone (voiced soulfully by David Thewlis), everyone around him has the same voice (thanks to Tom Noonan) and nothing feels right. It isn’t »

- The Film Stage

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This New Supercut Of Sad Scenes Will Definitely Make You Cry

5 June 2016 8:40 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Ever since the beginning of cinematic history, tears have greased the dramatic wheels of some of the most memorable moments to ever grace the screen. So why not put all of those moments together, into one, sadness fueled montage that'll make you cry as if you'd skinned your knee? Prepare yourself, for the saddest clip reel ever: Thanks to the good folks at Burger Fiction, this reel known as "This Supercut Will Make You Cry," does exactly that trick. All of your favorite, sorrow soaked moments are here. You want to see The Iron Giant's "Superman" moment? It opens the video. Feeling like watching the end of Marley and Me? Pony up the Kleenex, buckaroo! Is Disney your favorite purveyor of cry baby moments? There's both Disney And Pixar moments that make this list, including a trifecta from The Fox and the Hound, Bambi, and The Lion King. All »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: Wim Wenders, ‘City of Women,’ ‘Horse Money,’ and More

31 May 2016 8:06 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

City of Women (Federico Fellini)

Federico Fellini‘s epic 1980 fantasia introduced the start of the Maestro’s delirious late period. A surrealist tour-de-force filmed on soundstages and locations alike, and overflowing with the same sensory (and sensual) invention heretofore found only in the classic movie-musicals (and Fellini’s own oeuvre), La città delle donne [City of Women] taps into the era’s restless youth culture, coalescing into nothing less than Fellini’s post-punk opus. Marcello Mastroianni appears as Fellini’s alter »

- The Film Stage

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25 underappreciated family movies of the last 20 years

26 May 2016 8:09 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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From Flushed Away and Hunchback to Titan A.E. and Sky High - the family movies that don't get the love they deserve...

When I sit through a film such as Zootropolis, Rango, Frozen, Wreck-It Ralph, Eddie The Eagle or Coraline, I can’t help but be thankful somebody has bothered. As a parent as well as a movie lover, I’ve grown to really dislike family movies that just turn up to act as a surrogate babysitter for 90 minutes, with no intention of becoming anybody’s favourite film. The films I'm going to talk about are the family movies therefore that I think both try and do something a bit more, yet continue to fly under many people's radar. 

A bonus mention before we get going, and number 26 in the list, much to my surprise: Alvin & The Chipmunks 4. I was expecting next to zero from it, courtesy »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Player,’ ‘Manhunter,’ ‘A Married Woman,’ and More

24 May 2016 8:28 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

A Married Woman (Jean-Luc Godard)

A Married Woman is an often overlooked masterwork from Godard’s most productive period. The plot appears to be simple: Charlotte (Macha Méril) is a young married woman having an affair with an actor. When she discovers that she is pregnant, she must decide which man is the father and which man she will stay with. In Godard’s hands, however, the film, described as a film about a woman’s beauty and the ugliness of her world, »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Witch,’ ‘The Naked Island,’ ‘Inherent Vice,’ and More

17 May 2016 8:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Witch (Robert Eggers)

“We will conquer this wilderness. It will not consume us,” foreshadows our patriarch in the first act of The Witch, a delightfully insane bit of 17th century devilish fun. As if Ingmar Bergman and Ken Russell co-directed Kill ListRobert Eggers’ directorial debut follows a God-fearing Puritan family banished from their settlement in a colonial New England, only to have their deep sense of faith uprooted when our title character has her way with their fate. »

- TFS Staff

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We talk Angry Birds with director Fergal Reilly

11 May 2016 3:36 PM, PDT | www.themoviebit.com | See recent TheMovieBit news »

As The Angry Birds Movie prepares to catapult into cinemas this Friday, we caught up with Irish director and animation supremo Fergal Reilly to talk about his directorial debut. A native of Hunterstown, outside Ardee in Co. Louth, Reilly has worked extensively behind the scenes as a story board artist on some of our favourite animations from Space Jam to The Iron Giant, Hotel Transylvania to Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs, as well as adventures in live action with Stuart Little 2 and Spiderman 2, to name but a few. He tells us what drew him to The Angry Birds Movie with co-helmer Clay Kaytis, the challenges involved in adapting one of the world's most successful mobile games, what cartoons inspired his love of animation and the highlights so far in his twenty year career in Los Angeles. Check it out below.. Synopsis: The movie takes us to an island populated entirely by happy, »

- noreply@blogger.com (Clare Daly)

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