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Quaint St. Augustine (1939)

This Traveltalks short emphasizes the Spanish heritage and the oldest permanent settlement in the United States. An ostrich alligator farm is also visited.
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
James A. FitzPatrick ...
Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

This Traveltalks short emphasizes the Spanish heritage and the oldest permanent settlement in the United States. An ostrich alligator farm is also visited. Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@prodigy.net>

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Genres:

Short | Documentary

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

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Release Date:

4 November 1939 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

James A. FitzPatrick's Traveltalks: Quaint St. Augustine  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA High Fidelity Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)
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Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: We are in quaint St. Augustine, the pride of Florida and the oldest permanent white settlement in the United States, where the architecture of old Spain has been faithfully reproduced and preserved as one of the most colorful heritages of North America.
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User Reviews

TravelTalks
7 March 2015 | by (Louisville, KY) – See all my reviews

Quaint St. Augustine (1939)

** 1/2 (out of 4)

Fun entry in the TravelTalks series has host James A. FitzPatrick heading to St. Augustine, Florida where he talks about it being the oldest white settlement. Along our journey we see the oldest school house as well as one of the oldest houses on record. From here we see some of the local landmarks including Fort Marion and the location of where Pedro Menendez began his settlement in 1565. From here we take a look at an ostrich farm where we see them eat and finally we view an alligator farm, which was the largest in the country. We get some good shots of the alligators as they eat and we also see one of the workers wrestle one of them. Overall this here does exactly what you'd expect a film in this series to do. It tells you some history of what you're seeing and the Technicolor brings everything to life.


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