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Dreamland: A History of Early Canadian Movies 1895-1939 (1974)

 -  Documentary
7.5
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The early history of Canadian film making before the establishment of the National Film Board of Canada.

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Title: Dreamland: A History of Early Canadian Movies 1895-1939 (1974)

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Cast

Credited cast:
Gordon Sparling ...
Himself (Film director)
Nat Taylor ...
Himself (Theatre owner)
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This recounts the unrelenting struggle for Canadian filmmakers had before the establishment of the National Film Board to make any films. Considering their country's small population and the tremendous competition from the American film industry, this film celebrates the tenacity of those who dared to challenge the American oligopoly. Written by Kenneth Chisholm <kchishol@execulink.com>

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Addendum
19 June 1999 | by (Toronto, Canada) – See all my reviews

The film which "Dreamland" describes as the first Canadian film, "The Kiss" from 1896, upon further investigation is in fact an American Edison production which was quite notorious in its day due to its sensational subject matter. It appears frequently and under several different titles in references charting the beginnings of the cinema.

The reason we would automatically classify it as Canadian is that the Broadway star who appears in it, May Irwin, is from Whitby, Ontario. Presumably she is the first Canadian on film.


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