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Walking Thunder (1997)

PG | | Drama, Family | 21 August 1997 (USA)
In the 1850s, a young boy and his family on their way west become stranded in the Rockies. With the help of a local mountain man, a Sioux medicine man, and a legendary bear known as "... See full summary »

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(screenplay), (story) | 2 more credits »
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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Emma McKay (as Klara Irene Miracle)
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Ted Thin Elk ...
Dark Wind (as Chief Ted Thin Elk)
Kevin Conners ...
Billy Oscar ...
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Danny McKay (as Kasey Clyde)
David Kirk Chambers ...
Carolyn Hurlburt ...
Dane Stevens ...
Angus Campbell (as Duane Stephens)
Wayne Brennan ...
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Storyline

In the 1850s, a young boy and his family on their way west become stranded in the Rockies. With the help of a local mountain man, a Sioux medicine man, and a legendary bear known as "Walking Thunder," the boy learns to become a man, and his family's survival is secured. Brian Keith narrates this family Western adventure, which won a Silver Award at the WorldFest Film Festival. Written by Anonymous

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Drama | Family

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for elements of frontier violence | See all certifications »
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21 August 1997 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Lenda do Trovão  »

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Unexceptional family film
31 January 2016 | by (Victoria, BC) – See all my reviews

I really enjoyed the family movie "The Long Road Home" by prolific family filmmaker Craig Clyde, so I sat down to watch Clyde's "Walking Thunder" with some enthusiasm. Sad to say, this particular effort is pretty disappointing. Like TLRH, this movie didn't have much of a budget; there's little in the way of production values, unless you count the admittedly spectacular Utah scenery. But TLRH had things to make up for the low budget like a solid script and good acting. This particular script is lumbering and padded out. (And what's with the set-in-present bookends? They don't add anything to the story!) The acting by the almost totally amateur cast is pretty mediocre. The one star in the cast (if you don't count narrator Brian Keith), John Denver, seems bewildered by his surroundings. About the only positive things to say about this exercise are the pretty good musical score and a balanced view about how Native Americans were in the frontier west. But these things aren't enough to prevent kids as well as their parents from fidgeting in their seats while watching this.


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