4.7/10
111
7 user 8 critic

The Ramrodder (1969)

Cowboy marries an Indian princess and is accepted by the tribe until he is framed for a rape/murder.

Director:

(as Van Guylder)

Writer:

(as Van Guylder)
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ON DISC
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Roger Gentry ...
Rick Thompson (as Jim Gentry)
Kathy Williams ...
Tuwana
Robert Aiken ...
Brave Eagle (as Brave Eagle)
Julia Blackburn ...
Lucy
David Rosenkranz ...
Bo
Catherine Share ...
Cochina (as Kathy Share)
Kedric Wolfe ...
Minowa
Bobby Beausoleil ...
Saddle-Tramp Bandit (as Bob Beausoleil)
Marsha Jordan ...
Motula (as Marcia Jordan)
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Storyline

Cowboy Rick,on his way to visit his sweetheart, encounters a bevy of beautiful Indian maidens and dallies with one of them. Later, when one of the girls is murdered by a passing no-good, the tribe falsely blames Rick and sentences him to die. But Tuwanna, the chief's daughter with whom Rick, um, dallied, has other ideas. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

All the More Blatant in Color!

Genres:

Western

Certificate:

See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

23 January 1969 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Cattle Riggers  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Filmed at Spahn's Movie Ranch near Chatsworth, CA, in late 1968. The ranch was used for occasional filming of TV westerns like Bonanza (1959) and The Lone Ranger (1949), as well as for David O. Selznick's western Duel in the Sun (1946). However, with the decline of westerns in general, owner George Spahn decided to allow a group of misfit hippies to reside there temporarily in the spring of 1968 in exchange for minor upkeep of the ranch. This was shortly before filming of this movie took place. The group called themselves "The Family" and were led by Charles Manson and two of their members, Catherine Share and Bobby Beausoleil - who was later convicted of murdering a music teacher who sold mescaline to them - appear in this film. See more »

Crazy Credits

Director/co-writer "Van Guylder" is an alias for Ed Forsythe who directed this and several exploitation films. David F. Friedman is the uncredited producer. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Playboy: The Story of X (1998) See more »

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User Reviews

Cute girls, not much plot.
1 March 1999 | by (Florida) – See all my reviews

Budget? What budget? The producer probably gave the prop master a couple of bucks and sent him down to the local Western apparel shop for some cowboy outfits, and told him to pick up some leather bootstraps and chamois cloths for Indian garb on his way back. A couple of tepees, a house, some cute actresses, and they were ready to make a movie.

Don't watch this film for the story line or plot twists. Don't watch it for the stilted dialogue. Watch it for Marsha Jordan, who has a pretty good body even by today's standards, and some of the soft porn scenes. There's some topless female wrestling, a striptease around a campfire, and a few other examples of female exploitation. At one point Ms. Jordan even gets tied to a tree, stripped naked, and whipped in order to prove her love for her husband and to prove the innocence of a cowboy charged with rape (you'll have to see the movie to understand). This scene is actually pretty well done considering the budget and that it was made in 1969. They even included some fake blood for dramatic effect, and the hits are shown onscreen (really cheap movies show such things offscreen so that they don't have to pay for special effects).

The title refers to a type of black-powder gun, but it was obviously chosen for its double-meaning. Still, it's better than "Brand of Shame".


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