7.2/10
58
3 user 1 critic

How to Cheat in the Leaving Certificate (1997)

"How to cheat the Leaving Certificate ?" : a question posed by thousands of students every year in France... and Ireland. A group of pupils set up an elaborate masterplan to beat the system and top the points race.

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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Eamon Morrissey ...
Mr. Fornson
Aileen O'Connor ...
Cara
Garret Baker ...
Fionn
Lee Dunne ...
Brian Donnelly
Mary McEvoy ...
Charlie McDaid
Philip Bredin ...
Murphy
Alison Coffey ...
Elli
Margaret Jones ...
Elli's Mother
John Wright ...
Gary
Tara Ford ...
Una
Feargal Quinn ...
Fionn's Father
Mick Lally ...
Chief Examiner
Sarah Jones ...
Girl Shop Attendant
...
Exam Superintendent No.3
Maureen Potter ...
Una's Mother
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Storyline

"How to cheat the Leaving Certificate ?" : a question posed by thousands of students every year in France... and Ireland. A group of pupils set up an elaborate masterplan to beat the system and top the points race.

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17 April 1998 (Ireland)  »

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Trivia

Shortly before its release, the film was openly criticised by the Irish Junior Minister for Education Willie O'Dea (who hadn't yet seen it) for being a manual on how to cheat in the country's leaving cert exams. See more »

Connections

Featured in Fleadh Report (1997) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A classic indie movie from Ireland
28 June 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This is a really nice piece of Irish crime filmmaking, albeit that the criminals are really school students. I once spoke with a woman on a train in Italy who was from Ireland about the Leaving Certificate and she said it was one of the most horrific experiences of her life, as this film attests.

The movie tells the story of a bunch of disillusioned students who think the system is wrong and some of them really have a point because their friend committed suicide under the pressure. They hope their efforts will appease his soul, or something. They hope to highlight what is wrong with the grading system and, as we watch the film, it becomes clear in Ireland they have it quite wrong. Screenwriters Graham Jones and Tadhg O'Higgins are to be credited for making this point - and with a lot of wit at that.

I really loved the fact that it was shot in black and white on old fashioned film by the looks of it and so is very much the gangster picture. It has a strange sense of irony running through it too. I guess it's a sense of irony or humour the creators developed while going through the Irish school system. Top marks!


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