IMDb > The Big One (1997)
The Big One
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The Big One (1997) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.1/10   6,571 votes »
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Up 41% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Michael Moore (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Big One on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
10 April 1998 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Protecting the earth from the scum of corporate America. See more »
Plot:
On his book tour, Michael Moore exposes more wrongdoing by greedy big businesses and callous politicians around America. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
6 wins See more »
User Reviews:
this film feels more like a time capsule than anything else. See more (37 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Michael Moore ... Himself
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Elaine Bly ... Herself - Random House Media Escort

Dan Burns ... Himself - Radio Personality
Chip Carter ... Himself - Forbes Campaign

Bill Clinton ... Himself - Presidential Candidate (archive footage)
Jim Czarnecki ... Himself (as Jim)
Brian Danitz ... Himself (as Brian)
Robert Dornan ... Himself - Congressman (archive footage)
Joel Feick ... Himself - Radio Commentator
Steve Forbes ... Himself - Presidential Candidate (archive footage)
Doug France ... Himself - Random House Representative
Mary Gielow ... Herself - Media Escort in Milwaukee
Bev Jacowski ... Herself, Johnson Controls representative
Richard Jewell ... Himself - Innocent Guy
Kevin Keane ... Himself - Governor Thompson's Press Secretary

Garrison Keillor ... Himself
Andy Crash Kelly ... Himself - Radio Personality

Phil Knight ... Himself - Nike Chairman
Tia Lessin ... Herself (as Tia)
Mike McCurry ... Himself - White House Spokesman (archive footage)
Diane Mitchell ... Herself, Chicago Media

Rick Nielsen ... Himself - Entertainer
Keith Peters ... Himself - Nike Public Relations Director
Loretta Sanchez ... Herself - Congresswoman Elect (archive footage)

Chris Smith ... Himself (as Chris)

Jerry Springer ... Himself (archive footage)

Studs Terkel ... Himself - Author / Radio Host
Armstrong Williams ... Himself - Radio Talk Show Host
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Directed by
Michael Moore 
 
Writing credits
Michael Moore (written by)

Produced by
Jim Czarnecki .... line producer
Jeremy Gibson .... executive producer
Kathleen Glynn .... producer
Tia Lessin .... coordinating producer
David Mortimer .... executive producer
Dianne Griffin .... line producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
The World Famous Blue Jays (original music score written by)
 
Cinematography by
Brian Danitz (director of photography)
Chris Smith (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Meg Reticker 
 
Production Management
Maria Silver .... production manager
 
Art Department
Josh Laurence .... graphics
Dave Rogers .... graphics
 
Sound Department
John Alberts .... sound mixer
Dan Edelstein .... assistant sound mixer
Matt Foglia .... assistant sound mixer
Paul Furedi .... assistant sound mixer
Andy Kris .... sound editor
Sarah Price .... sound
Peter Waggoner .... sound mixer
Tony Volante .... sound re-recording mixer (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
John Brown .... additional camera operator
Matt Buchholz .... additional camera operator
Ryan Burchett .... additional camera operator
Jeff Campbell .... additional camera operator
Chad Davidson .... additional camera operator
Scott Drzycimaki .... additional camera operator (as Scott Drzycimski)
Jay Elkayam .... additional camera operator
Geoffrey O'Connor .... additional camera operator (as Geoff O'Connor)
Matt Shapiro .... additional camera operator
Jason Shoultz .... additional camera operator
Joshua Zeman .... camera operator: second unit (as Josh Zeman)
Kelly Nathe .... additional camera operator (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Mike Aldana .... assistant on-line editor (as Michael Aldana)
Richard Bergelson .... assistant on-line editor
Arnold Branch .... on-line editor
Ron Ng .... assistant on-line editor
Peter Ringer .... on-line editor
Ralph Scaglione .... on-line editor
Jim Villone .... associate editor
David C. Whitten .... color timer
 
Music Department
Jay Sherman-Godfrey .... music consultant
Jeremy Tepper .... music consultant
 
Other crew
Bill Bailey .... production assistant
Michael Bianchi .... production assistant
Douglas Bobenhouse .... production assistant
John Brudenell .... production assistant
Laura Chapnick .... production assistant
Stephen Charbonneau .... intern
Kathy Choe .... intern
Devorah DeVries .... production coordinator (as Devorah Devries)
Molly Donnellon .... production assistant
Hank Flynn .... production assistant
Danielle Frank .... intern
Harry Gant .... production assistant (as Harry Gnat)
Shon Gillilan .... intern
Diane Griffin .... production assistant
Justin Holstein .... production assistant
Michelle Johnston .... assistant production coordinator
Melissa Kurpinski .... production assistant
Phillip Mallisham .... production assistant
James C. Roach .... production assistant
Stuart Robertson .... intern
Nanu Segal .... intern
Chris Slater .... production assistant
Steve Smith .... production assistant
Adam Speigelman .... production assistant
Nicole Willson .... intern
 
Thanks
Gillian Aldrich .... grateful acknowledgment
James Ananich Jr. .... grateful acknowledgment
Dave Barber .... grateful acknowledgment
Brian Belfiglio .... grateful acknowledgment
Peter Berkow .... grateful acknowledgment
Rod Birleson .... grateful acknowledgment
Jason Blum .... grateful acknowledgment
Elaine Bly .... grateful acknowledgment
Peter Bradbury .... grateful acknowledgment
William Bradley .... grateful acknowledgment
Garry Burbank .... grateful acknowledgment
Dan Burns .... grateful acknowledgment
Roger Bybee .... grateful acknowledgment
Tom Callaghan .... grateful acknowledgment
Lori Casadonte .... grateful acknowledgment
Steve Dandaneau .... grateful acknowledgment
Carl Deal .... grateful acknowledgment
Rose Ann DeMoro .... grateful acknowledgment
Joanne Doroshow .... grateful acknowledgment
Cassie Ehrenberg .... grateful acknowledgment
Christine Fall .... grateful acknowledgment
Jon Feltheimer .... special thanks
Bill Gallagher .... grateful acknowledgment
Terry George .... special thanks
Mary Gielow .... grateful acknowledgment
Dolores Glynn .... special thanks
Donna Glynn .... special thanks
James Glynn .... special thanks (as James)
Buddy Gray .... grateful acknowledgment
Catherine Grimes .... grateful acknowledgment
Ann Frances Hamill .... grateful acknowledgment
Tim Hedges .... grateful acknowledgment
Rita Higgins .... special thanks
Al Hirvela .... grateful acknowledgment
Jen Hogan .... grateful acknowledgment (as Jennifer Hogan)
Michael Jackson .... special thanks
Katherine Katsens .... grateful acknowledgment
Garrison Keillor .... grateful acknowledgment
Andy Kelly .... grateful acknowledgment
Roger Kerson .... grateful acknowledgment
Jeanette King-Segnini .... grateful acknowledgment (as Jeannette King-Segnini)
Beth Kotler .... grateful acknowledgment
Michael Lavine .... acknowledgment: archival footage
Selina Lewis .... grateful acknowledgment
Frank Mahoney .... acknowledgment: archival footage
Debbie Manners .... grateful acknowledgment
Sean McTernan .... grateful acknowledgment
Diane Mitchell-Urman .... grateful acknowledgment
Frank Moore .... special thanks (as Frank)
Veronica Moore .... special thanks
Wung Mortimer .... special thanks
Barbara Moss .... grateful acknowledgment
Rick Nielsen .... grateful acknowledgment
Rick Patterson .... grateful acknowledgment
Ann Patty .... special thanks
John Peck .... grateful acknowledgment
Ruth Pleanar .... grateful acknowledgment
Josh Porter .... grateful acknowledgment
Suzy Quinones .... grateful acknowledgment
Richard Renaldi .... acknowledgment: archival footage, Impact Visuals
Matthew Robesch .... grateful acknowledgment
John Rogers .... grateful acknowledgment
Martin Rogers .... acknowledgment: archival footage, FPG Int'l
Natalie Rose .... special thanks
Brian Springer .... acknowledgment: archival footage
Jack Stanzler .... grateful acknowledgment
Ken Starr .... special thanks
Alicia Strickland .... grateful acknowledgment
Eric Tannenbaum .... special thanks
David Tenzer .... special thanks
Studs Terkel .... grateful acknowledgment
Kathy Tirschek .... grateful acknowledgment
Ciara Carolyn Torres .... grateful acknowledgment
Bob Weinstein .... grateful acknowledgment: ...and especially
Harvey Weinstein .... grateful acknowledgment: ...and especially
Laurie White .... grateful acknowledgment
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated PG-13 for some strong language
Runtime:
91 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The movie's title refers to renaming America as part of Michael's belief that America needs PR makeover.See more »
Quotes:
Audience Member:You should run for President! It would send a message!
Michael Moore:What message? Eat out more often?
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in The Corporation (2003)See more »
Soundtrack:
Peter Gunn ThemeSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
5 out of 7 people found the following review useful.
this film feels more like a time capsule than anything else., 1 July 2004
Author: Nick Lucchesi from United States

Michael Moore's The Big One is a typical Michael Moore documentary. By this post-Bowling for Columbine and present Fahrenheit 91I time period, much of America and the world know of Moore's feet first documentaries. With Moore becoming the funnier Mike Wallace of the '90s and shoving a microphone in the face of corporate and political bad guys at every turn, Moore again stirs up the corporate status quo in The Big One, released in 1998. The film covers the most threatening aspect to the American way of life at the time: corporate downsizing. The setting is the Midwest and Moore travels to small midwestern cities, most often the ones hit hardest by the factory closings and layoffs of the late '90s. While not as focused or even as serious as Moore's most recent efforts, this film is still reminiscent to his others in that it is both funny and thought provoking.

Most likely unintended by Moore when filming, this film feels more like a time capsule than anything else. While factory closings and layoffs have continued into the 2000s, the impact the closings of the'90s had on America are far greater than the layoffs of today. A documentary on corporate downsizing today would be lost amongst the far more serious issues of U.S foreign policy and all it is related to, including terrorism, the Patriot Act and homeland security, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Factory closings and plant layoffs in exchange for higher corporate profits are an important issue, but when viewed six years later, this film seems almost insignificant.

The Big One covers American politics as an extension of corporate America in that both elite politicians and elite CEOs are essentially the same type of person. In one segment, Moore covers the most recent presidential campaign, and in a series of interviews, many people say that they refused to vote because both candidates in 1996 were the same person; the only difference was their political party name. Today, America is so polarized politically that the idea of refusing to vote based on the fact that the candidates are too similar is not only incorrect, but also outlandish. However, one must remember that Moore was first a journalist, and his films are news-based, and by the hand, are not meant to have the longest of shelf lives. At their best, they are perfect time capsules of various issues facing America at a certain time period.

Moore is highly visible in this film as he was in 1989's Roger and Me, only using his interview subjects to further his story and cause. While he does allow the characters to speak for themselves, they are only backing up his claims and not necessarily adding any more to the film than mere quotes. Moore's feelings and political motives are what make up this documentary, and they come through 100% to the viewer as Moore makes a convincing case for his cause.

The film's use of humorous stock footage, broadcast news reports, and stand-up comedy scenes with Moore behind the microphone make for entertaining segments that either divert the viewer from the story and provide for some comic relief, or conversely, further the story when the footage has a sharp political undercurrent. Moore's juxtaposition of serious-minded news reports as the build up with one of his narrated comments as the punch line are entertaining and part of what make his documentaries fun to watch as well as informative.

The Big One, while it does not necessarily have as solid of a story as Moore's other films and may be criticized for coming off as a 90-minute commercial for Moore's book, Downsize This, does manage to string together a few interviews with humor and a serious issue to effectively promote Moore's cause. Although we know Nike CEO and Moore interviewee Phil Knight would never put a Nike shoe factory anywhere in the US, much less in Moore's hometown of Flint, Michigan, the fact that Moore asked Knight to do so concisely summarizes Moore's message and wish: that US-owned companies stop closing factories and outsourcing to cheaper foreign markets and start giving US workers their jobs back. Anyone who has taken an international business course or even perused the Wall Street Journal knows outsourcing will continue. Moore's ability to increase the public's awareness is his best trait as a filmmaker, not his attempt to single handedly change the entire face of US and international business.

The soundtrack, like other Moore films, is mostly there for humorous purposes. Moore lets the most serious moments in his films go without any sound other than the person weeping or ranting for maximum effect. That being said, his use of humorous songs including Americana classics pace the film and add to its quick nature. Moore only uses scene titles sparingly, as his narration divides the film verbally. The use of scene titles is not necessary when Moore is walking his viewers through the film.

Funded by the British Broadcasting Company, Moore's budget is much more than his contemporaries', but even a large budget cannot save this film. His choice of story topic is not lasting enough to appeal to viewers not living with the economic divisions between rich and poor of the late 1990s. Also, if Moore had let the story lead him to various locations across the country instead of his book tour navigating, maybe he would have found out more information and created something better than The Big One. Additionally, perhaps if Moore had narrowed his ideas of what he wanted to cover before he started filming ('The Big One' refers to the US as the 'big' country) instead of attempting to cover American politics, the economy and sagging social standards all in one 90-minute documentary, his ideas would have came across even clearer than they already do. This is where Moore succeeds in his later films, especially Bowling For Columbine, which strictly focuses on a single issue with minimal sidebars.

Sources of tension in this film go from the comedic sources ('media escorts,' i.e. middle age blonde women who cannot handle Moore's independent spirit) to the most serious ones (the US government and big business). He tries to grapple too much in The Big One, and that is where this film ultimately fails.

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I have to disagree with Moore carterbradley
he didn't give her the book brydels
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Ending Credits Song supple77
SONG QUESTION!! binc_kato
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