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Pippi Goes on Board (1969) Poster

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Pippi Longstocking (1969), the first German-made theatrical compilation film of the Swedish TV series Pippi Longstocking (1969), was intended to be the ultimate film version of the series. However, since that film was a phenomenal success at the German box-office, and news was announced of an original theatrical film (Pippi in the South Seas (1970)) preparing to be produced in Sweden, Beta Film (the German co-producers of the Swedish TV series and producers of the first compilation film) decided to capitalize on the rising Pippi-Mania by producing this film a few months later, using scenes and episodes not used for the first film. Titled "Die Neuesten Abenteuer von Pippi Langstrumpf: Pippi Geht von Bord" ("The Newest Adventures of Pippi Longstocking: Pippi Goes on Board") as a reference to the second Astrid Lindgren Pippi book, "Pippi Goes on Board" ("Pippi Långstrump Går Ombord" in Swedish), the film itself has little-to-nothing to do with the original book of the same name, in terms of story (although the story's proper conclusion is used at the beginning as a flashback, since it was already used as the climax of the first compilation film), so upon this film's release in Sweden four years later (despite the first film never having been released there), the film was more conveniently retitled "Here Comes Pippi Longstocking" (which is also the name of the TV series' Swedish theme song). While still available on home video in Germany, this film was rarely seen in Sweden after its 1973 release there.
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Despite this film being advertised as "Pippi Longstocking's third great adventure" in the US, this is actually the second film, a direct sequel to Pippi Longstocking (1969), with more material from the TV series not included in that film. This was the third film presented in the US in 1975 (the second being the actual third film, Pippi in the South Seas (1970) in 1974). Some US video/movie guides have even listed this as the final film in the series, which it wasn't. (The fourth and final film was Pippi on the Run (1970), released in the US in 1977.)
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This compilation film actually originated from West Germany (which co-produced the original TV series), and not the United States, as is commonly believed. (See also Pippi Longstocking (1969).) While the first film was not shown in Sweden (where the series was produced), this sequel film was released there in 1973 under the title "Here Comes Pippi Longstocking" ("Här Kommer Pippi Långstrump"). However, this film's jumbled continuity has caused a lot of confusion for Swedish viewers (including observant Pippi fans), who had not seen the first compilation film.
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In the original German version, during the final freeze frame at the end, a male voice over announces that Pippi will return in her next adventure, "Pippi Langstrumpf auf Taka-Tuka-Land" ("Pippi Longstocking on Taka-Tuka-Land"), which was the German proto-release title for the Swedish film Pippi in the South Seas (1970). (Its final title in Germany would be "Pippi in Taka-Tuka-Land.") At the very same time this film was first released to German theaters on Halloween of 1969, the announced movie was right in the middle of its filming stage.
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In the Swedish Pippi Longstocking (1969) TV series, characters sang occasionally, but not in the way of a musical, strictly speaking. Pippi, Tommy, and Annika would sing Swedish folk songs, some with new lyrics. A few times, school children sang folk tunes as well, with only one or two occasions where they are aided by music. (Only the two films Pippi in the South Seas (1970) and Pippi on the Run (1970) had full-blown musical moments; the former more than the latter.) In this film, new songs were dubbed over the moments of singing, although again, not in a musical manner. However, the film's soundtrack album contains musical versions of the songs featured in this film, and are still available in song/music collections for the German version of the series/movies. Taken into consideration, the German version of the Pippi Longstocking series/movies has more soundtrack songs than the entire Swedish version combined.
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