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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

4 items from 2016


Film Review: ‘Therapy for a Vampire’

10 June 2016 11:27 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Back before “The Sopranos” — well, actually, just as “The Sopranos” was midway through its first season — a movie comedy came out that presented the idea of a gangster who goes to see a psychiatrist as just about the most nutty, screw-loose hi-larious concept in the world. Even after six seasons of “The Sopranos,” the notion behind the Robert De Niro/Billy Crystal comedy “Analyze This” still sounds kind of funny, and it’s no trick to apply the same basic joke to certain other…professions. A gladiator seeing a psychiatrist. A superhero seeing a psychiatrist. Donald Trump seeing a psychiatrist. (Well, okay, there are limits to plausibility.) So how about a vampire seeing a psychiatrist — or, better yet, a vampire going to see the Op (original psychiatrist): the man himself, Sigmund Freud? Are you laughing yet? Or, if you’re one of the few people who will go to the new Austrian movie “Therapy for a Vampire,” are you spitting up the comedy equivalent of a blood clot?

We’re in Vienna in 1932, and the monster in question who seeks out Freud’s help is Count Geza von Közsnöm, a Romanian bloodsucker who is bored, bored, bored with his vampire wife, Elsa (Jeanette Hain), because the two have been married for, like, centuries. Can anyone relate? (Nudge, nudge.) Count Geza is played by Tobias Moretti, who in profile does look a bit like Bela Lugosi, but mostly he resembles a debauched Mike Wallace. He’s a very civilized and depressed aristocrat, who has become so jaded by his lifestyle that he has an assistant go out and draw blood from victims, which he then guzzles out of a flask. Dr. Freud (Karl Fischer) has no idea that he’s treating an undead neurotic, and therapy, as it turns out, doesn’t do the count much good. He’s too much in thrall to his lost love from hundreds of years ago, who he thinks has been reincarnated in Lucy (Cornelia Ivancan), a bohemian model who’s having relationship issues. Her artist boyfriend, Viktor (Dominic Oley), insists on painting her as a blonde — and, indeed, seems to be getting ready to go full “Vertigo” on her.

If a diagram were the same thing as a script, then “Therapy for a Vampire” might be a smashingly silly lark. But as written and directed by Daniel Ruehl, the film is a blueprint of mild anemic kitsch. It’s an undead comedy without the blood of experience coursing through its veins. The count and his wife, who you might say are at each other’s throats, each pair off with one half of the young couple. Elsa, whose undead style consists of wearing a Louise Brooks bob (though it looks more like a Louise Brooks wig purchased in a costume shop), latches onto Viktor and insists that he paint her portrait so that she can see what she looks like. (Mirrors weren’t doing the trick.) And the count woos Lucy with that whole “Come and be a creature of the night! You will live forever!” routine. The best thing in the movie is Cornelia Ivancan. She’s got a real bloom — a glow of misbehavior. No one will let Lucy just be who she is (Viktor wants to change her hair color, the count wants to change her mortality), and “Therapy for a Vampire,” to the extent that it has a theme, is a feminist anthem. If only it weren’t such a cheesy, thinly written, badly lit one.

The notion of an old vampire couple coping with the anomie of the ages owes an obvious debt to Jim Jarmusch’s “Only Lovers Left Alive” (2014), which was an infinitely more textured — and funnier — movie. The way this all plays out in “Therapy for a Vampire” brings it closer to being a bloodsucker version of “Escape (The Piña Colada Song).” Call it “The Plasma Colada Song.”

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- Owen Gleiberman

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"It Ain't Flashy, It Ain't Sexy": 14-Minute Interview With Tom McCarthy, Director Of Best Picture Oscar Winner 'Spotlight'

1 March 2016 1:29 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

One of the more reductive jabs thrown at "Spotlight" by some during the awards season was that it had all the craftsmanship of a TV movie. ScreenCrush did a pretty good job in vigorously defending the artistry of Tom McCarthy's film, which is certainly subtle, but no less accomplished. It takes a special kind of talent to avoid obviously dramatic filmmaking and pull off a movie as powerful as "Spotlight." Chatting last week with Studio 360, the filmmaker is upfront that it was a conscious decision that served the movie, to avoid visual pyrotechnics.  Read More: Analyze This: Why 'Spotlight' Beat 'The Revenant' And 'The Big Short' To Win Best Picture "Every time I take on a film, the style is representative of the content. Here, we're talking about journalism. It ain't flashy. It ain't sexy. When it's done well, it's incredibly impactful, and that's what we were shooting for, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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2016 Oscars: The Best And Worst Of The 88th Academy Awards

29 February 2016 11:14 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Well, thank heavens that's over. The 88th Academy Awards are done and dusted, and for the umpteenth year in a row, your stalwart Playlist buddies found themselves staying up way past their bedtimes in their respective time zones, despite having faithfully promised themselves they wouldn't, to watch the whole thing through to the bitter end. Read More: Analyze This: Why 'Spotlight' Beat 'The Revenant' And 'The Big Short' To Win Best Picture None of us are about to say the night was an unqualified success, but even the most crotchety in the Playlist (and there is significant dissension in the ranks, unusually enough) have to admit there were some bits that sucked less than others. So here's our hot-take roundup of the highlights and lowlights of the 2016 Oscar ceremony.Best: The Opening Monologue Firstly, let's just say there is a diversity of opinion in the Playlist ranks over Chris Rock's opening monologue, »

- Jessica Kiang

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‘Manchester By The Sea’s Kenneth Lonergan On Directing Just Three Films In 16 Years – Sundance Studio

27 January 2016 1:31 PM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

“I’m not someone who loves moviemaking,” says Kenneth Lonergan, whose writing credits on such films as Gangs of New York and Analyze This greatly out number his directing credits. In fact, the director behind the Sundance Film Festival entry Manchester By The Sea, which was the first of the fest’s big pickups at $10M, prefers it that way and explains his reasons here. Manchester By The Sea marks Lonergan’s third directorial following 2011’s Margaret and 2000’s You Can Coun… »

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4 items from 2016


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