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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 45 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Looking back at the Wing Commander movie

2 June 2014 4:45 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The movie adaptation of the hit Wing Commander videogame series came out in 1999. We find out whether time's been kind to it...

Feature

It’s easy to forget just how greatly visual effects shifted in the late 1990s. Techniques that had survived more-or-less unchanged since the dawn of cinema - scale models, matte paintings, stop-motion, to name a few - were suddenly joined by a new generation of jaw-dropping computer graphics.

Such groundbreaking movies as Tron, Young Sherlock Holmes and The Abyss paved the way, but the digital revolution pretty much exploded in the 1990s, starting with the eye-popping morph effects of Terminator 2: Judgment Day, the dinosaur shots in Jurassic Park and the CG-assisted bullet time of The Matrix in 1999.

In the midst of the CG revolution sweeping through cinemas by the close of the decade - as seen in The Matrix and the year’s other gargantuan release, »

- ryanlambie

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As Tribeca Kicks Off, 'A Brony Tale' Leads Some Must-See Docs

16 April 2014 1:46 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

“The business of the business is so crazy and complicated that we forget why we’re doing what we’re doing,” said veteran producer and Hollywood refugee Paula Weinstein at a kickoff lunch for the Tribeca Film Festival Tuesday. “Now, I’m reminded everyday why we’re doing what we’re doing.” The veteran producer of “Analyze This,” “The Perfect Storm,” and “The Company Men" is enjoying in her third month as a VP at Tribeca Enterprises. Youth has a lot to do with it, Weinstein said. After all, the Tribeca Film Festival is only 13, so there were matzohs and macaroons on hand and a glancing nod at Passover, as well as acknowledgement by Tribeca founder Jane Rosenthal that the festival planned mostly to do what it had done before -- just better. Weinstein, who recently relocated from La to Manhattan, couldn’t be happier about it. She said the »

- John Anderson

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The HeyUGuys Instant Watching Guide – March 24th 2014

24 March 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Not much to speak of in the pre-amble this week except that From Dusk Till Dawn episode 2 on Netflix continued in fine form and presented an interesting and somewhat unique version of a vampire which was actually quite scary. If you have written this off because it sounds cheap and forced (admittedly on paper it does) I urge you to give it a watch, the dialogue alone is better than most TV shows, “Got your balls on?” is a great line I will repeat ad nauseam henceforth.

In other news Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has criticised internet providers for not providing a good enough service to allow users to use Netflix to its full potential and the costs of maintaining such a connection, mainly what ISPs are expecting streaming companies to pay them. This has also kicked off a debate about net neutrality which I know little about. I believe »

- Chris Holt

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FX Orders Billy Crystal Comedy Pilot 'The Comedians' to Series

19 March 2014 12:33 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Billy Crystal is coming back to the small screen, and not just via his upcoming HBO special. Crystal's new comedy pilot, "The Comedians," has received a series order from FX, according to Deadline. The premise finds Crystal's veteran comic character teaming up with Josh Gad's young up-and-comer for a sketch show. The pilot was written and directed by Larry Charles ("The Dictator," "Curb Your Enthusiasm"), who also serves as the show's executive producer along with Crystal, Matt Nix ("Burn Notice") and Ben Wexler ("Community"). Based off the Swedish series "Ulveson and Herngren," "The Comedians" is a half-hour, single camera comedy that will certainly bring in an older demographic than FX usually attracts with shows like "Archer" and "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia." Crystal guest starred on Lisa Kudrow's Showtime show, "Web Therapy" last year. He appeared with the "Friends" star in "Analyze This" and "Analyze That »

- Ben Travers

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FX Orders Billy Crystal Comedy Pilot 'The Comedians' to Series

19 March 2014 12:33 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Billy Crystal is coming back to the small screen, and not just via his upcoming HBO special. Crystal's new comedy pilot, "The Comedians," has received a series order from FX, according to Deadline. The premise finds Crystal's veteran comic character teaming up with Josh Gad's young up-and-comer for a sketch show. The pilot was written and directed by Larry Charles ("The Dictator," "Curb Your Enthusiasm"), who also serves as the show's executive producer along with Crystal, Matt Nix ("Burn Notice") and Ben Wexler ("Community"). Based off the Swedish series "Ulveson and Herngren," "The Comedians" is a half-hour, single camera comedy that will certainly bring in an older demographic than FX usually attracts with shows like "Archer" and "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia." Crystal guest starred on Lisa Kudrow's Showtime show, "Web Therapy" last year. He appeared with the "Friends" star in "Analyze This" and "Analyze That »

- Ben Travers

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9 TV Stars Who Horribly Botched Their Big Leap Into Films

17 March 2014 3:32 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Aaron Paul became a critically acclaimed actor while appearing in a recurring role on the television series Big Love and earned even more praise – and won two Emmy Awards – for his starring role on Breaking Bad. So why is it that the movie Need for Speed, which starred Paul, underperformed in U.S. theaters this past weekend?

Just because Paul is an award-winning actor on television does not mean audiences were going to pack the theaters to see his movie. In fact, there is a long history of wildly popular television stars who fail in their attempt to transition to movie stardom. In many cases, these TV stars made poor choices when it came to film roles. In other instances, viewers simply had no interest in seeing these actors play anything else but their beloved TV characters.

For every George Clooney there are many TV »

- Chris McKittrick

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Listen: Harold Ramis On Harold Ramis

27 February 2014 11:48 AM, PST | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

The late Harold Ramis left an indelible mark on the comedy world upon his passing Monday, leaving behind a body of work that included some of the best-loved comedy films of all time – Animal House, Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, Groundhog Day, and Analyze This among them. If you’ve got an hour and a half, you probably won’t find a better in-depth and career-spanning look at a pioneering career as you will get from this interview that Ramis gave in 2009 at the Museum of the Moving Image on the eve of releasing his final film, Year One. He covers everything from his days of futility trying to break in at Saturday Night Live (too ethnic), to his days in the Second City comedy troupe through his big break into Hollywood, relationship with guys like Belushi and Murray, and beyond. It’s a long sit, so you might want to listen when you have some time, »

- MIKE FLEMING JR

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Listen: Harold Ramis On Harold Ramis

27 February 2014 11:48 AM, PST | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

The late Harold Ramis left an indelible mark on the comedy world upon his passing Monday, leaving behind a body of work that included some of the best-loved comedy films of all time – Animal House, Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, Groundhog Day, and Analyze This among them. If you’ve got an hour and a half, you probably won’t find a better in-depth and career-spanning look at a pioneering career as you will get from this interview that Ramis gave in 2009 at the Museum of the Moving Image on the eve of releasing his final film, Year One. He covers everything from his days of futility trying to break in at Saturday Night Live (too ethnic), to his days in the Second City comedy troupe through his big break into Hollywood, relationship with guys like Belushi and Murray, and beyond. It’s a long sit, so you might want to listen when you have some time, »

- MIKE FLEMING JR

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Harold Ramis obituary

25 February 2014 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Actor, writer and director who changed the course of Us film comedy with movies such as Ghostbusters and Groundhog Day

The writer, director and actor Harold Ramis, who has died aged 69 from complications of autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis, was responsible for one masterpiece and several influential smash-hits. In each of his creative capacities, he was the eternal quiet man. In front of the camera, his blithe and undemanding presence often disguised his comic skill or made it appear effortless; he seemed happy to hang back and surrender the limelight to more demonstrative and dynamic collaborators, such as his Ghostbusters co-stars Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd. In his writing and directing he was adept at capitalising on an audience's love of coarseness without resorting to cruelty or sacrificing his compassion.

Much of his work – including National Lampoon's Animal House (1978), Meatballs (1979) and Ghostbusters (1984), all of which he co-wrote, and Caddyshack (1980), which he co-wrote »

- Ryan Gilbey

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Obama Remembers Harold Ramis: 'One of America's Greatest Satirists'

25 February 2014 9:25 AM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Barack Obama praised actor, writer and director Harold Ramis, who died yesterday at the age of 69, as "one of America's greatest satirists" in a touching statement that detailed his and Michelle Obama's relationship with the entertainer, according to The Hollywood Reporter. And, for good measure, the President even snuck in an excellent, poignant Caddyshack reference.

"When we watched his movies – from Animal House and Caddyshack to Ghostbusters and Groundhog Day – we didn’t just laugh until it hurt," Obama said. "We questioned authority. We identified with the outsider. We rooted for the underdog. »

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Fdny mourns Harold Ramis with Ghostbusters logo - picture

25 February 2014 4:26 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Despite his remarkable back catalogue, from National Lampoon and Stripes to Groundhog Day and Analyze This, the piece of work Harold Ramis will most be remembered for is Ghostbusters.

Fans have already paid tribute to his writing and acting performance as Dr Egon Spengler with their own Twinkie tribute at Hook & Ladder 8, and the Fire Department of the City New York (Fdny) has followed suit at The Ghostbusters House.

Dr. Peter Venkman: "What do you think, Egon?"

Dr. Egon Spengler: "I think this building should be condemned. There's serious metal fatigue in all the load-bearing members, the wiring is substandard, it's completely inadequate for our power needs, and the neighbourhood is like a demilitarized zone."

Dr Ray Stantz: "Hey. Does this pole still work?"

Dr Ray Stantz: "Wow. This place is great. When can we move in? You gotta try this pole. I'm gonna get my stuff. Hey. We should stay here. »

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Harold Ramis 1944-2014: Ghostbusters star's life in pictures

25 February 2014 2:43 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Harold Ramis - the writer, director and actor who helped re-shape American comedy in the '70s, '80s and '90s - passed away yesterday at the age of 69.

A performer with Chicago's Second City and the National Lampoon comedy troupe early on in his career, Ramis made his film breakthrough when he co-wrote the script for Animal House. Before long he was heading behind the camera to direct Bill Murray in golf comedy Caddyshack and Chevy Chase classic Vacation.

Ghostbusters, which Ramis co-wrote with Dan Aykroyd, provided him with his biggest commercial hit in 1984. Ramis memorably played bespectacled scientist Egon Spengler, adding some dry wit to counteract the scene-stealing from Bill Murray.

The success of Ghostbusters and its 1989 sequel allowed Ramis to keep on directing films, with 1993's Groundhog Day his career highlight. The comedy offered up an unexpectedly profound look at the life of a weatherman (played »

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R.I.P Harold Ramis (1944 - 2014)

24 February 2014 10:26 PM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

We are very sad to report the passing of actor, writer and director Harold Ramis, who has passed away at the age of 69. He was surrounded by family when he died at 12:53 a.m. from complications of autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis, a rare disease that involves swelling of the blood vessels, his wife Erica Mann has said.

Ramis has been battling his health issues which began in May 2010 with an infection that led to complications related to the autoimmune disease. In late 2011, he suffered a relapse of the vasculitis after having to re-learn how to walk.

With writing credits on comedy classics such as National Lampoon's Animal House and Stripes, Ramis was a beloved part of the comedy circuit during the late 70s, 80s and 90s. He was a head writer on Second City Television in Chicago and had directing credits on National Lampoon's Vacation, Groundhog Day and Analyze This. »

- Luke Owen

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Harold Ramis Dead At 69

24 February 2014 7:08 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Actor-director Harold Ramis died on Monday at the age of 69.

According to the Chicago Tribune, Ramis was surrounded by family when he died at 12:53 a.m. from complications of autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis, a rare disease that involves swelling of the blood vessels, his wife Erica Mann Ramis said.

He played Ghostbuster scientist Egon Spengler and Bill Murray’s Army recruit buddy in “Stripes. He co-wrote and directed “Caddyshack,” ”Groundhog Day,” and “Analyze This.” He helped write “Meatballs,” ”Ghostbusters” and ”Stripes.”

Murray, who collaborated with Ramis on a number of projects, issued this statement to Time through his lawyer: “Harold Ramis and I together did the National Lampoon Show off Broadway, Meatballs, Stripes, Caddyshack, Ghostbusters and Groundhog Day. He earned his keep on this planet. God bless him.”

From the AP:

His death rattled a modern comedy world Ramis helped build. His legacy as a father figure to generations of »

- Movie Geeks

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R.I.P. Harold Ramis

24 February 2014 5:42 PM, PST | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

American acting and filmmaking legend Harold Ramis passed away this morning.

The 69-year-old Ramis reportedly died from complications of a rare disease - autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis (blood vessel swelling).

Ramis' health struggles began in May 2010 with an infection that led to complications related to the disease. He had to relearn to walk, but suffered a relapse in late 2011. He was surrounded by family when he died.

Ramis is best known for co-writing and starring as Dr. Egon Spengler in the "Ghostbusters" films as well as co-writing and starring in the military comedy "Stripes".

While he also had memorable roles in "As Good as It Gets," "Airheads," "Knocked Up," "Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story," he was even more famous for his filmmaking. In his time Ramis wrote and directed such comedy classics as "Caddyshack," "National Lampoon's Vacation," "Groundhog Day" and "Analyze This".

Our sincerest condolences go out to his family, »

- Garth Franklin

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Comedy Legend Harold Ramis Dead at 69

24 February 2014 4:49 PM, PST | WorstPreviews.com | See recent Worst Previews news »

Comedy legend Harold Ramis has passed away at his Chicago-area home from complications related to an autoimmune disease, a condition he battled for the past four years. He was 69 years old. Ramis is likely best known for his acting roles in "Ghostbusters" and "Ghostbusters II," both of which he co-wrote. He also co-wrote "National Lampoon's Animal House," "Stripes," "Caddyshack" and "National Lampoon's Vacation," directing the latter two films. He co-wrote, produced and directed other comedy classics like "Groundhog Day," "Multiplicity" and the Billy Crystal-Robert De Niro films "Analyze This" and "Analyze That." He directed 2005's "The Ice Harvest," starring John Cusack and Billy Bob Thornton. Most recently he wrote, co-produced and directed 2009's "Year One," starring Jack Black and Michael Cera. Before his death, he was involved with "Ghostbusters III." Bill Murray commented on his friend's death, stating: "He earned his keep on this planet. God bless him. »

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How meeting comedy giant Harold Ramis exceeded any expectations I had

24 February 2014 2:00 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

There are very few perfect films. Part of what makes films so beautiful and rich and rewarding is that they are the result of a sort of mass insanity that happens when you have all of these people all pushing to create something tangible, something that moves us to some sort of real emotional place. It's easy to forget that movies are ultimately a bunch of people standing around playing make-believe, but with a crew there to capture it all. Considering how many moving pieces there are in any film, it's almost miraculous when they actually come together coherently, much less in a way that manages to make us genuinely lose ourselves in what we're watching. Harold Ramis made a perfect movie. "Groundhog Day" is one of the few mainstream comedies that I think actually grows and gets richer and more wonderful the more you revisit it, something which seems »

- Drew McWeeny

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Harold Ramis, Director Of "Groundhog Day" And "Caddyshack", Dead At Age 69

24 February 2014 1:48 PM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Harold Ramis, who helped found the Second City comedy troupe and legendary TV series, has died after a long illness. He was 69 years old. Ramis wrote, directed and appeared in many hit comedy feature films. Among the hit films he directed were Caddyshack, Groundhog Day and Analyze This. He also wrote or appeared in films such as National Lampoon's Animal House, Stripes and Ghostbusters. He was part of a generation that reinvented TV and motion picture comedy. Ramis was a native of Chicago and had moved back there in recent years. For more on his life and achievements, click here.  »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Remembering Comedy Legend Harold Ramis

24 February 2014 1:40 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

We're losing them too fast, aren't we? Today comes the sad news that comedy legend Harold Ramis passed away from autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis at age 69. He was old enough to have influenced a generation of comedy writers, from Adam Sandler to Judd Apatow, but gosh, 69 still feels too young. Most viewers will remember Ramis as Egon Spengler, the dry one in his landmark '84 hit Ghostbusters. No, the really dry one - the egghead who strapped Rick Moranis into some sort of cranial contraption to hear him spout about the return of Gozer the Traveler; the one who explained the »

- Alynda Wheat, PEOPLE Movie Critic

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Harold Ramis, comedy legend behind 'Caddyshack,' 'Ghostbusters,' and 'Groundhog Day,' dies at age 69

24 February 2014 1:03 PM, PST | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

With his sly, Cheshire cat grin and twinkling, half-mast eyes hidden behind owlish glasses, Harold Ramis always gave the impression of a guy who was guarding the punchline to the world’s funniest joke. And it’s quite possible he was. After all, if anyone had the merry-prankster genius to conceive it, polish it into a jeweler-precise gem, and deliver it with crack comic timing, it was Ramis, who passed away early Monday morning at age 69 from complications of autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis, a rare disease that involves the swelling of blood vessels.

Although Ramis became a familiar face on both »

- Chris Nashawaty

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 45 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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