6.6/10
57
3 user 1 critic

The Phantom Baron (1943)

Le baron fantôme (original title)
Elfy, Countess of Saint-Hélié's daughter, was brought up with her foster sister Anne, in an old dilapidated castle whose landlord, Baron Julius Carol, disappeared mysteriously some day. The... See full summary »

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(screenplay), (dialogue) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
André Lefaur ...
Odette Joyeux ...
Elfy de Saint-Hélié
...
Anne
Alain Cuny ...
Hervé
...
La comtesse de Saint-Helie
André Alerme ...
Le colonel (as Alerme)
...
L'évêque
Marguerite Pierry ...
Fébronie Dauphin
Claude Sainval ...
Albéric de Marignac
Charles Vissières ...
Toussaint - le domestique
...
Le baron Julius Carol - le baron fantôme
Marguerite de Morlaye ...
Une vieille dame
Marcel Pérès ...
Léopold - le frère de Fébronie
Jean Diéner ...
Joseph - le cocher
Jacques Ory ...
Hervé enfant
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Storyline

Elfy, Countess of Saint-Hélié's daughter, was brought up with her foster sister Anne, in an old dilapidated castle whose landlord, Baron Julius Carol, disappeared mysteriously some day. The two girls had a playmate, Hervé, the son of the gamekeeper. Now that they are adult, Anne is in love with Hervé while Elfy thinks she loves the young man. One day, the baron's mummified body is found in an oubliette and the secret of the estate is revealed... Written by Guy Bellinger

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Plot Keywords:

royalty | ghost | See All (2) »

Genres:

Drama

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Release Date:

16 June 1943 (France)  »

Also Known As:

The Phantom Baron  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Trivia

Re-released in France in 1971. See more »

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User Reviews

Gothic oddity

Jean Cocteau co-writes the screenplay and plays the briefly seen title role, but his influence is all over the place. After a creepy beginning heavy on the German Expressionism, it settles into a leisurely Bronte-style romantic cauldron, with a quadrangle of post-Napoleon Era youths in a French village battling class distinctions that get in the way of their romantic yearnings, which, interestingly, seem largely based on whoever is the most inaccessible. Subplot involves an old local kook who may or may not be Louis XVI's missing heir, and hovering over everything is the mystery of that crazy old nobleman who disappeared in the dilapidated local castle, where there may be a hidden treasure. The answer comes in a moment of jaw-dropping comic horror, but is almost an anti-climactic footnote in this story that is far from being resolved. Even further along is a stunning somnambulist sequence that has to be seen to be believed. Oddly enough, every loose end of this scattered tale is tied together by the happy conclusion. Certainly a piece of cinema from the distant past, but unlike anything you've ever seen from the English speaking world. I'd be stretching it to call this classic cinema, but it's visually exquisite and if you're in the mood for something unusual, it's a treat.


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