IMDb > Narcotic (1933)
Narcotic
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Narcotic (1933) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

User Rating:
3.7/10   199 votes »
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Writers:
A.J. Karnopp (story)
Hildegarde Stadie (screenplay)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Narcotic on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
March 1934 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
One night of bliss... A thousand nights of hell..!
Plot:
As the opening scroll tells us, Narcotic was "presented in the hope that the public may become aware... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
There are few films like it See more (9 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)
Harry Cording ... Dr. William G. Davis
Joan Dix ... Mrs. Davies
Patricia Farley ... Mae

Jean Lacy ... Lena (as Jean Lacey)
J. Stuart Blackton Jr. ... Gee Wu
Paul Panzer ... Cashier
Miami Alvarez ... Drug addict
Charles Bennett ... Hand wrestler
Josef Swickard ... Federal narcotics agent
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Herman Hack ... Burger (uncredited)
Celia McCann ... Prostitute (uncredited)
Fred Parker ... Policeman (uncredited)
Hildegarde Stadie ... Blonde Waiting Outside Davies' Office (uncredited)
Blackie Whiteford ... Dennison (uncredited)

Directed by
Dwain Esper 
Vival Sodar't 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
A.J. Karnopp  story
Hildegarde Stadie  screenplay
Hildegarde Stadie  story

Produced by
Dwain Esper .... producer
Hildegarde Stadie .... producer
 

Distributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Narcotic Racket" - USA (reissue title)
"Narcotic!" - USA (promotional title)
"Narcotic: As Interpreted by Dwain Esper" - USA (closing credits title)
See more »
Runtime:
57 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Writer Hildegarde Stadie based the script on true events. She had gone on tour with a great uncle as a little girl when he worked the medicine show circuit selling the elixir Tiger Fat. The film is actually considered to be a very accurate and unexaggerated retelling of his life.See more »
Goofs:
Boom mic visible: In the close-up of Davies after he forces the man out of his house, the edge of the mike dips into the shot and hovers above his head.See more »
Quotes:
Mrs. Davies:But my husband has will power!
Gee Wu:Yes. Mr Davies has great will power!
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in American Grindhouse (2010)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
4 out of 8 people found the following review useful.
There are few films like it, 31 January 2004
Author: Kieran Kenney from California

Dwain Esper produced this film in 1933 or 34, using a script

written by his wife, Hildegarde Stadie. Hildegarde had baised it on

the life of a sort-of great uncle of hers, Dr. William Davies, a drug

addict and peddler of the cure-all "Tiger Fat." Her dialoge is

actually pretty good for an exploitation film, yet the actors go

through it too fast for it to register with the viewer.

Narcotic is a really unique movie. For an exploitation film, it treats

the subject matter with unheared of sincerity. Rather than showing

teenagers as victims, this movie depicts adults, and follows one in

particular, William Davies, though a good thirty years of his life. In

other features like The Pace that Kills (1935), characters duck out

of frame when they go to snort drugs. In a long party scene, a

number of differant characters snort crack on camra (probably

really sugar or something, but oh well), and there's even a painful

close-up of a needle going into a vein to mainline.

One also has to marvel at the production values. There's a number

of complex shots throughout the movie, looking down from high

angles at characters, looking straight up from the ground, looking

into a room though the back of a blazing fire place. Scenes are

shot from all differant angles and most use some sort of stock

footage that doesn't match with the action. Nothing is seemless,

and it's really hard to loose yourself in it. Yet that's the mark of

Esper. Clearly he, or Vival Sodar't, was just directing under

impulse, without worrying whether or not it would cut together

smoothly.

Concerning the stock footage, one scene that really stands out is a

scene where a car collides head-first with a train. It was obviously

shot in the early twenties (you can tell by the women's clothes) and

was probably taken from another drug film: 1923's Human

Wreckage. If this is the case, than it would be the only footage that

survives from that film.

All-in-all, Narcotic is an interesting slice of drug life in the thirties.

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