Wild Wild West
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1-20 of 28 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


What Does Will Smith Really Think About Wild Wild West?

23 June 2016 6:05 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

This summer marks the 20th Anniversary of the hit blockbuster Independence Day, which turned Will Smith into a massive superstar overnight. It became the first movie ever to gross more than $500 million worldwide, and, naturally, after that movie started raking it in at the box office, everyone wanted Will Smith in their movies. Over the next few years, Will Smith would go on to star in hits such as Men in Black and Enemy of the State, but the actor recently addressed one of his missteps, the 1999 Western action adaptation of the Wild Wild West TV show which brought in some sci-fi elemenst to boot.

Wild Wild West wasn't an absolute bomb in theaters, but it still came in far below the rest of his hits over the late 1990s. Wild Wild West took in $113.4 million domestically and $222.1 million worldwide, from a hefty $170 million budget back in 1999. Will Smith starred »

- MovieWeb

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Will Smith Admits ‘Wild Wild West’ Was Terrible, He Was More Concerned With Movie Stardom Than Art

23 June 2016 11:07 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Will Smith has had his string of hits and misses at the box office, and probably one of his most known flops was the 1999 western “Wild Wild West.” While the action-comedy did give audiences a catchy theme song (and introduced fans to Enrique Iglesias with “Bailamos”), the $170 million dollar flick bombed at the box office and made a total of $222 million worldwide. Plus, the critics weren’t “wicky, wicky wild” about it either.

During a Cannes Lions panel, the actor revealed that he took that role at a time when he was more concerned about being a movie star than creating projects he was passionate about.

“I had so much success that I started to taste global blood and my focus shifted from my artistry to winning,” Smith expressed. “I wanted to win and be the biggest movie star, and what happened was there was a lag — around ‘Wild Wild West »

- Liz Calvario

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Will Smith Regrets Tricking His Fans Into Seeing ‘Wild Wild West’

22 June 2016 7:53 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Will Smith doesn’t want to trick his fans into seeing bad movies, like “Wild Wild West,” anymore. E! Online reported the movie star cited the 1999 big-budget Western numerous times while reflecting on his blockbuster career at Cannes Lions on Tuesday.   “I had so much success that I started to taste global blood and my focus shifted from my artistry to winning,” Smith said. “I wanted to win and be the biggest movie star, and what happened was there was a lag — around ‘Wild Wild West’ time — I found myself promoting something because I wanted to win versus promoting something because. »

- Beatrice Verhoeven

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Will Smith Regrets Trying to Be the World's "Biggest Movie Star"

22 June 2016 4:48 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Will Smith is a rarity in Hollywood. After all, he is the only actor in history to have eight consecutive films gross north of $100 million at the domestic box office and 10 consecutive films gross north of $150 million internationally. But these days, star power has less of an impact than it once did. Moreover, as Smith explained at Cannes Lion Tuesday, becoming popular wasn't as fulfilling as he'd imagined. "I had so much success that I started to taste global blood and my focus shifted from my artistry to winning," he recalled. "I wanted to win and be the biggest movie star, and what happened was there was a lag—around Wild Wild West time—I found myself promoting something because I »

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Will Smith is very sorry for tricking you into seeing 'Wild Wild West'

21 June 2016 4:04 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Did you pay good money from your weekend job at Jamba Juice to see the universally-loathed 1999 adaptation of Wild Wild West, which one contemporary critic called “extremely stupid and incompetent” and another deemed a “colossal waste of talent”? If the answer is “yes,” then Will Smith is very, very sorry about that. In a roundup of the actor’s Tuesday talk at the Cannes Lions marketing conference (a.k.a. “the only truly global meeting-place for branded communications professionals to connect, share and discover,” whew!), THR reports that Smith “repeatedly brought up 1999's Wild Wild West as a personal low point,” and they aren’t kidding. Though the superstar has been involved in other notable stinkers such as The Legend of Bagger Vance and After Earth, he clearly holds a special place of unquenchable scorn in his heart for the millennial stinker, which saw him starring opposite such other slumming talents as Kevin Kline, »

- Chris Eggertsen

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Will Smith Opens Up About His Past Professional Mistakes And How He is Now Focusing on His Philanthropic Work With Just Water

21 June 2016 3:00 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Will Smith received a standing ovation during a panel discussion at the 63rd Cannes Lions festival Tuesday where he was on hand to discuss his involvement with Just water. The actor, 47, who is one of many investors in the company including his 17-year-old son Jaden and Queen Latifah, promoted the ethically sourced 100 percent spring water that comes in a paper bottle. The water's environmentally friendly container helps reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions by up to 74% when compared to traditional plastic water bottles. In a heartfelt discussion, Smith told the packed theater that there was a time in his career when »

- Mia McNiece

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Superherostuff: Suicide Squad HeroBox

15 June 2016 8:07 AM, PDT | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

Once I got stuck in the Belle Reve Prison. I got sent to DC Comics' supermax prison for a combination of jaywalking, ripping the tag off a mattress, committing tax fraud with a volleyball named Wilson, trolling comic book movie companies, and breaking my paladin's alignment in Dungeons and Dragons. Yeah, I'm a pretty harden criminal. It did afford me a wonderful opportunity to meet the cast of the government's newly commissioned Task Force X. Will Smith was there for Wild Wild West and Jayden Smith, Cara Delevingne was there for streaking through the woods, Jay Hernandez was there because Kirsten Dunst's dad in Crazy/Beautiful had political connections, and Jared Leto was there because of what happened at the end of Requiem For A Dream. Good times!   What I did learn from that experience though is the existence of the SuperHeroStuff Suicide Squad HeroBox! So intense! The Suicide Squad HeroBox is a hand picked and specially crafted mystery gift box inspired by »

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Warner Bros, and its disastrous movie summer of 1997

13 June 2016 2:21 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Warner Bros has struggled with its blockbusters of late. But back in summer 1997 - Batman & Robin's year - it faced not dissimilar problems.

Earlier this year it was revealed that Warner Bros, following a string of costly movies that hadn’t hit box office gold (Pan, Jupiter Ascending, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., In The Heart Of The Sea), was restructuring its blockbuster movie business. Fewer films, fewer risks, more franchises, and more centering around movie universes seems to be the new approach, and the appointment of a new corporate team to oversee the Harry Potter franchise last week was one part of that.

In some ways, it marks the end of an era. Whilst it retains its relationships with key directing talent (Ben Affleck, Clint Eastwood, Christopher Nolan for instance), Warner Bros was, for the bulk of the 1990s in particular, the studio that the others were trying to mimic. It worked with the same stars and filmmakers time and time again, and under then-chiefs Terry Semel and Robert Daly, relationships with key talent were paramount.

Furthermore, the studio knew to leave that talent to do its job, and was also ahead of the pack in developing franchises that it could rely on to give it a string of hits.

However, whilst Warner Bros is having troubles now, its way of doing business was first seriously challenged by the failure of its slate in the summer of 1997. Once again, it seemed to have a line up to cherish, that others were envious of. But as film by film failed to click, every facet of Warner Bros’ blockbuster strategy suddenly came under scrutiny, and would ultimately fairly dramatically change. Just two summers later, the studio released The Matrix, and blockbuster cinema changed again.

But come the start of summer 1997? These are the movies that Warner Bros had lined up, and this is what happened…

February - National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation

Things actually had got off to a decent enough start for the studio earlier in the year, so it's worth kicking off there. It brought Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo back together, for the fourth National Lampoon movie, and the first since 1989’s National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. Interestingly, it dropped the National Lampoon moniker in the Us, and instead released the eventual movie as Vegas Vacation. It was a belated sequel, back when belated sequels weren’t that big a thing.

The film was quickly pulled apart by reviewers, but it still just about clawed a profit. The production budget of $25m was eclipsed by the Us gross of $36m, and the movie would do comfortable business on video/DVD. Not a massive hit, then, but hardly a project that had a sense of foreboding about it.

Yet the problems were not far away.

May – Father's Day

Warner Bros had a mix of movies released in the Us in March and April 1997, including modest Wesley Snipes-headlined thriller Murder At 1600, and family flick Shiloh. But it launched its summer season with Father’s Day, an expensive packaged comedy from director Ivan Reitman, starring Robin Williams and Billy Crystal. It had hit written all over it.

Father’s Day was one of the movies packaged by the CAA agency, and its then-head, Mike Ovitz (listed regularly by Premiere magazine in the 1990s as one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, if not the most powerful man). That he brought together the stars, the director and the project, gave a studio a price tag, and the studio duly paid it. Given Warner Bros’ devotion to star talent (Mel Gibson, then one of the biggest movie stars in the world, and a major Warner Bros talent, was persuaded to film a cameo), it was a natural home for the film. It quickly did the deal. few questions asked.

That package, and CAA’s fees for putting it together, brought the budget for a fairly straightforward comedy to a then-staggering $85m. The problem, though, was that the film simply wasn’t very good. It’s one of those projects that looks great on paper, less great when exposed on a great big screen. Warner Bros has snapped it up, without - it seems - even properly reading the script. 

Premiere magazine quoted a Warner Bros insider back in November 1997 as saying “when [CAA] calls and says ‘we have a package, Father’s Day, with Williams and Crystal and Reitman, we say ‘great’”, adding “we don’t scrutinise the production. When we saw the movie, it took the wind out of us. We kept reshooting and enhancing, but you can’t fix something that’s bad”.

And it was bad.

The movie would prove to be the first big misfire of the summer, grossing just $35m in the Us, and not adding a fat lot more elsewhere in the world. Warner Bros’ first film of the summer was a certified flop. More would soon follow.

May - Addicted To Love

A more modestly priced project was Addicted To Love, a romantic comedy starring Meg Ryan and Matthew Broderick. Just over a year later, Warner Bros would hit big when Meg Ryan reunited with Tom Hanks for Nora Ephron’s You’ve Got Mail. But here? The film was a modest success, at best.

Directed by Griffin Dunne (making his directorial debut), and put together in partnership with Miramax, Addicted To Love was based around the Robert Palmer song of the same name. But whilst it was sold as a romcom, the muddled final cut was actually a fair bit darker. There was an underlying nastiness to some moments in the film, and when the final box office was tallied, it came in lower than the usual returns for pictures from Ryan or Broderick. Counter-programming it against the release of The Lost World: Jurassic Park didn’t massively help in this instance either, especially as the Jurassic Park sequel would smash opening weekend records.

Addicted To Love ended up with $34.6m at the Us box office. It would eke out a small profit.

June - Batman & Robin

And this is when the alarm bells started to ring very, very loudly. Summer 1997 was supposed to be about a trio of sure-fire hit sequels: Batman 4, Jurassic Park 2 and Speed 2. Only one of those would ultimately bring home the box office bacon, the others being destroyed by critics, and ultimately leaving far more empty seats than anticipated in multiplexes.

Batman & Robin, it’s easy to forget, came off the back of 1995’s Joel Schumacher-steered Batman reboot, Batman Forever that year's biggest movie). It had one of the fastest-growing stars in the world in the Batsuit (George Clooney), and the McDonald’s deals were signed even before the script was typed up. You don’t need us to tell you that you could tell, something of a theme already in Warner Bros' summer of '97.

That said, Batman & Robin still gave Warner Bros a big opening, but in the infancy of the internet as we know it, poisonous word of mouth was already beginning to spread. The film’s negative cost Warner Bros up to $140m, before marketing and distribution costs, and it opened in the Us to a hardly-sniffy $42m of business (although that was down from previous Batman movies).

But that word of mouth still accelerated its departure from cinemas. It was then very rare for a film to make over 40% of its Us gross in its first weekend. But that’s just what Batman & Robin did, taking $107.3m in America, part of a worldwide total of $238.2m. This was the worst return for a Batman movie to date, and Warner Bros had to swiftly put the brakes on plans to get Batman Triumphant moving.

It would be eight years until Batman returned to the big screen, in Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins. Warner Bros would undergo big changes in the intervening period.

As for the immediate aftermath of Batman & Robin? Warner Bros co-chief Robert Daly would note at the end of '97 that “we’d have been better off with more action in the picture. The movie had to service too many characters”, adding that “the next Batman we do, in three years – and we have a deal with George Clooney to do it – will have one villain”.

Fortunately, Warner Bros’ one solid hit of the summer was just around the corner…

July - Contact

And breathe out.

Warner Bros bet heavily again on expensive talent here, with Robert Zemeckis bringing his adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Contact to the studio for his first film post-Forrest Gump. Warner Bros duly footed the $90m bill (back when that was still seen as a lot of money for a movie), a good chunk of which went to Jodie Foster. It invested heavily in special effects, and gave Zemeckis licence to make the film that he wanted.

The studio was rewarded with the most intelligent and arguably the best blockbuster of the summer. I’ve looked back at Contact in a lot more detail here, and it remains a fascinating film that’s stood the test of time (and arguably influenced Christopher Nolan’s more recent Interstellar).

Reviews were strong, it looked terrific, and the initial box office was good.

But then the problem hit. For whilst Contact was a solid hit for Warner Bros, it wasn’t a massively profitable one. Had Father’s Day and Batman & Robin shouldered the box office load there were supposed to, it perhaps wouldn’t have been a problem. But when they failed to take off, the pressure shifted to Contact.

The movie would gross $100.9m in the Us, and add another $70m overseas (this being an era were international box office rarely had the importance it has today). But once Warner Bros had paid its bills, there wasn’t a fat lot over for itself. Fortunately, the film still sells on disc and on-demand. Yet it wasn’t to be the massive hit the studio needed back in 1997.

July - One Eight Seven

From director Kevin Reynolds, the man who helmed Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves and Waterworld, came modestly-priced drama 187, starring Samuel L Jackson (in a strong performance). Warner Bros wouldn’t have had massive box office expectations for the film (although it can't have been unaware that the inspirational teacher sub-genre was always worth a few quid), and it shared production duties on the $20m movie with Mel Gibson’s Icon Productions. But still, it would have had its eye on a modest success. What it got in return was red ink.

The film’s not a bad one, and certainly worth seeking out. But poor reviews gave the film an uphill struggle from the off – smaller productions arriving mid-summer really needed critics on their side, as they arguably still do – and it opened to just $2.2m of business (the less edgy, Michelle Pfeiffer-headlined school drama Dangerous Minds had been a surprise hit not two years before).

By the time its run was done, 187 hadn’t even come close to covering its production costs, with just under $6m banked.

Warner Bros’ summer slate was running out of films. But at least it had one of its most reliable movie stars around the corner…

August - Conspiracy Theory

What could go wrong? Mel Gibson and Julia Roberts were two of the biggest movie stars in the world in 1997, at a time when movie stars still equated to box office gold. Director Richard Donner, one of Warner Bros’ favourite directors, had delivered the Lethal Weapons, Maverick, Superman, The Goonies and more for the studio. Put them altogether, with Patrick Stewart (coming to wider public consciousness at the time off the back of his Star Trek: The Next Generation work) as a villain, and it should have been a big hit.

Conspiracy Theory proved to be one of the more ambitious summer blockbusters of the era. It lacks a good first act, which would be really useful in actually setting up more of what’s going on. But Gibson played an edgy cab driver who believes in deep government conspiracies, and finds himself getting closer to the truth than those around him sometimes give him credit for.

Warner Bros was probably expecting another Lethal Weapon with the reunion of Gibson (who had to be persuaded to take Conspiracy Theory on) and Donner (it’s pretty much what it got with the hugely enjoyable Maverick a few years’ earlier), but instead it got a darker drama, with an uneasy central character that didn’t exactly play to the summer box office crowd.

The bigger problem, though, was that the film never quite worked as well as you might hope. Yet star power did have advantages. While no juggernaut, the film did decent business, grossing $137m worldwide off the back of an $80m budget ($40m of which was spent on the salaries for the talent before a single roll of film was loaded into a camera). That said, in the Us it knocked a genuine smash hit, Air Force One, off the top spot. Mind you in hindsight, that was probably the film that the studio wished it had made (the cockpit set of Warner Bros' own Executive Decision was repurposed for Air Force One, fact fans).

Still: Warner Bros did get Lethal Weapon 4 off Gibson and Donner a year later…

August - Free Willy 3: The Rescue

Yeah.

Warner Bros opened its third Free Willy film on the same day as Conspiracy Theory (can you imagine a studio opening two big films on the same day now), but it was clear that this was a franchise long past its best days (and its best days hardly bring back the fondest of memories).

Still, Free Willy movies were relatively modest in cost to put together, and Warner Bros presumably felt this was a simple cashpoint project. But in a year when lots of family movies did less business than expected (Disney’s Hercules, Fox’s Home Alone 3, Disney’s Mr Magoo), Free Willy 3 barely troubled the box office. It took in just over $3m in total, and Willy would not be seen on the inside of a cinema again.

August - Steel

Not much was expected from Steel, a superhero movie headlined by Shaquille O’Neal. Which was fortunate, because not much was had.

It had a mid-August release date in the Us, at a point when a mid-August release date was more of a dumping ground than anything else. And even though the budget was set at a relatively low $16m, the film – and it’s an overused time – pretty much bombed. It took $1.7m at the Us box office, and given that its appeal hinged on a major American sports star whose fame hardly transcended the globe, its international takings did not save it (it went straight to video in many territories).

It was a miserable end to what, for warner bros, had been a thoroughly miserable summer.

So what did hit big in summer 1997?

Summer 1997 was infamous for big films failing to take off in the way that had been expected – Hercules, Speed 2, and the aforementioned Warner Bros movies – but there were several bright spots. The big winner would be Barry Sonnenfeld’s light and sprightly sci-fi comedy Men In Black, starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. Star power too helped score big hits for Harrison Ford (Air Force One), Julia Roberts (My Best Friend’s Wedding) and John Travolta (Face/Off).

This was also the summer that Nicolas Cage cemented his action movie credentials with Face/Off and Con Air. Crucially, though, the star movies that hit were the ones that veered on the side of 'good'. For the first of many years, the internet was blamed for this.

Oh, and later in the year, incidentally, Titanic would redefine just what constituted a box office hit...

What came next for Warner Bros?

In the rest of 1997, Warner Bros had a mix of projects that again enjoyed mixed fortunes. The standout was Curtis Hanson’s stunning adaptation of L.A. Confidential, that also proved to be a surprise box office success. The Devil’s Advocate didn’t do too badly either.

However, two of the studio’s key filmmakers failed to really deliver come the end of 1997. Clint Eastwood’s Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil failed to ignite (although many felt he was always on a hiding to nothing in trying to adapt that for the screen), and Kevin Costner’s The Postman would prove arguably the most expensive box office disappointment of the year. No wonder the studio rushed Lethal Weapon 4 into production for summer 1998. Oh, and it had The Avengers underway too (not that one), that would prove to be a 1998 disappointment.

The studio would eventually take action. The Daly-Semel management team, that had reigned for 15 years, would break up at the end of 1999, as its traditional way of doing business became less successful. The pair had already future projects that were director driven to an extent (Eyes Wide Shut), and it would still invest in movies with stars (Wild Wild West). But the immediate plan of action following the disappointment of summer 1997 – to get Batman 5 and Superman Lives made – would falter. It wouldn’t be until 1999’s The Matrix (a film that Daly and Semel struggled to get) and – crucially – 2001’s Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stone that the studio would really get its swagger back...

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Movies Feature Simon Brew Warner Bros 16 Jun 2016 - 05:19 Conspiracy Theory Father's Day Addicted To Love Contact National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation One Eight Seven Steel Batman & Robin Free Willy 3: The Rescue »

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William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93

9 May 2016 10:52 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Former SAG president William Schallert, best known as TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show,” died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, Calif. He was 93. His son Edwin confirmed his death.

His most memorable role was as beloved TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show” (1963-66). The performance still resonates: TV Guide slotted him at No. 39 on its list of Greatest TV Dads of All Time in 2004.

Schallert would be familiar to many for his memorable appearance on the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of the original “Star Trek” series: He played Nilz Baris, the agriculture undersecretary who is outraged to discover that the furry, endlessly reproducing aliens have devoured all the grain.

Schallert served as SAG president from 1979-81 and oversaw a three-month strike in 1980 that centered around rates and residuals for pay TV, videocassettes and videodiscs and included a successful boycott of the year’s primetime Emmy Awards. »

- Laura Haefner

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William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93

9 May 2016 10:52 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Former SAG president William Schallert, best known as TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show,” died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, Calif. He was 93. His son Edwin confirmed his death.

His most memorable role was as beloved TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show” (1963-66). The performance still resonates: TV Guide slotted him at No. 39 on its list of Greatest TV Dads of All Time in 2004.

Schallert would be familiar to many for his memorable appearance on the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of the original “Star Trek” series: He played Nilz Baris, the agriculture undersecretary who is outraged to discover that the furry, endlessly reproducing aliens have devoured all the grain.

Schallert served as SAG president from 1979-81 and oversaw a three-month strike in 1980 that centered around rates and residuals for pay TV, videocassettes and videodiscs and included a successful boycott of the year’s primetime Emmy Awards. »

- Laura Haefner

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Comic Book Review: Rough Riders #1

2 May 2016 9:41 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

   First of all let’s just get this out of the way, I am a sucker for books and movies that feature prominent moments and figures from American History no matter how ridiculous the concept seemed. For example in films movies like Wild Wild West and Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Also in books titles like American Legends (Top Cow Productions Inc. & Image Comics) and All Star Western (DC Comics) and well you get the trend. Now Adam Glass through Aftershock Comics has released a very interesting book called “Rough Riders”. Which features a team of soon to be legends such as Theodore Roosevelt, Thomas Edison, Harry Houdini as well as others. They are set to travel to Cuba and defeat a threat using alien technology to destroy American vessels. The cover alone sold me the book as it features the team of Rough Riders in an antique style color palette »

- Emmanuel Gomez

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Prince -- Mad Scramble to Cash In On Famous Image

28 April 2016 1:00 AM, PDT | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

A free-for-all has erupted over the right to sell merchandise with Prince's mug.   We did some checking, and turns out there's no particular law in Minnesota that protects a person's image after he or she dies. Translation ... when Prince passed away last week, there's nothing in the law specifically prohibiting any Tom, Dick, or Harry from plastering Prince's face on t-shirts, socks, posters, key chains and all things cheesy. It's way different from places like California and Tennessee, »

- TMZ Staff

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How much should movie critics know about movies?

17 April 2016 2:07 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Should there be a 'ground zero' of knowledge for movie criticism? And what makes a critic effective at their job?

When I sat down to watch It Follows for the first time at the start of last year, I had no idea what I was getting. I'm increasingly an avoider of trailers, and try as much as possible to see films cold. It doesn't always work, but in the case of It Follows, it very much did.

As I’ve written before, the film had a very primal effect on me, in that it had me backing further and further into my seat, genuinely unnerved and more than a little scared by what was happening on screen. I hadn't felt like that watching a film for a long time, and my eventual write-up reflected that. Aside from the subtexts of the movie, which I, in truth, only came to later, »

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10 Reasons Batman V Superman’s Ending Is The Stupidest Part Of The Film

29 March 2016 7:34 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Warner Bros. Picture

If there’s one rule of DC comic book movies that Batman V Superman proves, it’s that Warner Bros. will always get their way eventually. After all, they’ve been trying to get these two heroes to duke it out on screen for over a decade (a script was written in 2003 and a foreshadowing easter egg inserted into I Am Legend in 2006), despite the concept not being a big part of the characters in print. In addition to the disappointing titular bout though, Dawn Of Justice also sees the studio finally live out another one of their biggest fantasies of the past quarter-century.

Back in the late nineties, Warner were very keen to get a reboot of Superman off the ground, bringing in Tim Burton as director and Jon Peters to produce. As reported by several writers who worked on the project – including super Super-fan Kevin Smith »

- Alex Leadbeater

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25 great music scores composed for not very good movies

29 March 2016 3:26 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Some brilliant scores accompany movies that don't always deserve them. Here are 25 examples...

Can a film soundtrack rescue a movie that is otherwise a lost cause? One thing’s for sure: throughout the history of cinema, music has often been the redeeming feature of many an underwhelming movie. Here are 25 amazing film scores composed for films that, frankly, didn’t deserve them.

25) Meet Joe Black (Thomas Newman, 1998)

This somnambulistic three hour romantic drama should really feature an extra screen credit for star Brad Pitt’s fetishised blonde locks. Rising way above the torpid melodrama of the plot is one of Thomas Newman’s most hauntingly melodic and attractive scores, one that leaves his characteristic quirkiness at the door to paint a portrait of death that is both melancholy and hopeful. The spectacular 10-minute finale That Next Place remains one of Newman’s towering musical achievements.

24) Timeline (Brian Tyler, »

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SXSW 2016 Interview: Ti West and Jason Blum Talk In A Valley Of Violence

28 March 2016 11:36 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

A departure from their normal genre, director Ti West (House of the Devil) and producer Jason Blum took a dive into the Wild West with their new film In a Valley of Violence. During SXSW, I sat down with the two low-budget horror masterminds and discussed their latest movie, their passion for genre film, and the impressive power of John Travolta.

What made you both decide to move forward with a Western, especially since at this moment in time it’s not necessarily the most popular genre?

Ti West: Jason and I have been talking about movies for a long time, and there was never quite the right one. It seemed like such a long shot, but I was such a fan of Ethan [Hawke] and they have done movies together before and they are friends, so I wanted to bring this one to them first.

The highest compliment I »

- Jenny Nulf

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Gear Up For Spring With All of the Exciting New Movies Coming to HBO Now in April

22 March 2016 8:22 AM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Just in time for Spring, HBO Now and HBO Go are gifting us with some brand-new titles for April that will blow through your living room like a breath of fresh air. From the nonstop laughs of Amy Schumer's Trainwreck to the terrifying dinos of Jurassic World, there are plenty of incredible titles to choose from, so don't miss your opportunity to watch them while you can. Also make sure you check out March's selection before they disappear, plus Hulu's new April movies! Theatrical premieres: April 2: Trainwreck Unrated April 9: Lucy April 11: Inherent Vice April 18: We Are Your Friends April 23: Jurassic World April 27: Dracula Untold April 30: Paper Towns Original programming highlights: April 1: El Hipnotizador April 4: Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures April 7: Animals. April 9: Nothing Left Unsaid: Gloria Vanderbilt & Anderson Cooper April 10: Togetherness April 14: HBO First Look: »

- Quinn Keaney

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The Superman Films That Were Never Made

20 March 2016 6:38 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

This week, Neil Calloway looks at Superman movies that were planned but never shot…

When the Christopher Reeve fronted Superman films came to a juddering halt in 1987 it would be almost twenty years before Clark Kent made another appearance on the big screen.

To be fair, between Superman IV: The Quest For Peace and 2006’s under appreciated Superman Returns, Superman was rarely off the small screen, featuring in Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman from 1993 to 1997 and in Smallville from 2001-2010 (proving that Gotham wasn’t the first attempt to show the origins of a DC superhero on TV). However, its near ubiquity on television didn’t stop several attempts to return it to the big screen.

Producer Jon Peters (who had produced Tim Burton’s 1989 Batman film) spent the mid nineties attempting to bring Superman back. Originally titled Superman Reborn, Kevin Smith (such a comic book fan »

- Neil Calloway

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Trachtenberg On "Crime," "Y: The Last Man"

14 March 2016 10:20 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

He shot to fame with an inspired short film based on the "Portal" video game series, and now his new film "10 Cloverfield Lane" is both a box-office and critical darling. So what's next for rising young filmmaker Dan Trachtenberg?

Slashfilm spoke with the direct late last week and touched upon two other projects he's been linked with. The first is a time travel action heist film titled "Crime of the Century".

Trachtenberg has been actively developing the idea for several years with writers Daniel Kunka and Gary Doberman taking a shot. He admits when it was sold it was still a basic idea rather than a full script, so it has taken time to develop:

"Crime of the Century is a badass time travel heist movie. And I'm desperate to make it. It's still in development. Hopefully now that I've finished up with this, I could swing back into that »

- Garth Franklin

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Will Smith Is All Smiles a Day After Getting Ribbed in Chris Rock's Oscar Monologue

1 March 2016 7:50 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Will Smith isn't letting Chris Rock's Oscar dig keep him down. Smith, 47, was all smiles as he was spotted leaving the set of his upcoming film Collateral Beauty in New York on Monday. There, he flashed his signature smile, signed autographs and snapped a few selfies with fans. At one point, he even threw up a peace sign for the photographers. The actor's good mood comes just one day after Rock singled him and Jada Pinkett Smith out in his opening monologue at the awards ceremony. While addressing the #OscarsSoWhite controversy, Rock mentioned Smith and his wife, who decided to skip the ceremony. »

- Jodi Guglielmi, @JodiGug3

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