6.5/10
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101 user 54 critic

The Impostors (1998)

R | | Comedy | 2 October 1998 (USA)
In an attempt to resurrect the slapstick comedy of Laurel and Hardy or The Marx Brothers, Stanley Tucci and Oliver Platt team-up as two out-of-work actors who accidentally stowaway on a ... See full summary »

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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Walker Jones ...
Jessica Walling ...
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George Guidall ...
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Ted Blumberg ...
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Storyline

In an attempt to resurrect the slapstick comedy of Laurel and Hardy or The Marx Brothers, Stanley Tucci and Oliver Platt team-up as two out-of-work actors who accidentally stowaway on a ship to hide from a drunken, belligerent lead actor who has sworn to kill them for belittling his talents. Of course, the lead actor end up on the ship as well. Also, a madman (Tony Shalhoub) plots the destruction of the ship and Steve Buscemi is a depressed, suicidal lounge singer named Happy Frank. Written by John Sacksteder <jsackste@bellsouth.net>

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Taglines:

Why be yourself when you can be somebody else? See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some language | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

2 October 1998 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ship of Fools  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$308,767 (USA) (2 October 1998)

Gross:

$2,197,921 (USA) (8 January 1999)
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(Technicolor)

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1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Stanley Tucci and Oliver Platt first met at Yale University where they developed the characters of the two unemployed actors that they play in this film. See more »

Goofs

When Arthur puts his giant martini down on the counter, Happy can be seen in the background pulling it towards him. A second later when he and Emily are seen from the front talking, the martini glass is nowhere to be seen. It is too large to not be in the shot. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Maurice: [as they discuss an act which they did] I'm sorry.
Arthur: You stole my death.
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Crazy Credits

As the closing credits roll, the entire cast performs a line dance, starting on the ocean liner set and working their way out of the soundstage. See more »

Connections

References Some Like It Hot (1959) See more »

Soundtracks

China Boy
Written by Dick Winfree and Phil Boutelje
Performed by Eddie Condon and His Allstars
Courtesy of Verve Records
By Arrangement with Polygram Film & TV Music
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User Reviews

 
Rib-ticklingly hilarious!!!
15 August 2003 | by (Perth, Australia) – See all my reviews

This is a top-notch comedy at the most audacious level. I once heard someone say that door-slamming farcical comedy never works on film; and I think this is one of the movies that proves them wrong. It reminded me of the brilliant stage farce "Noises Off" (which was also turned into a movie with fairly successful results).

I thought the opening title gags were brilliant, especially Oliver Platt. I loved Billy Connolly as a camp tennis player and Allison Janney as a gangster's moll. I also thought Alfred Molina, Tony Shalhoub, Campbell Scott, Steve Buscemi and Matt McGrath were brilliant as well. The pastry shop scene and Tucci crying poor were also outstanding highlights.

My only slight criticism with this film is that the pacing seemed a tiny bit slow at times, but otherwise this is an exceptional storyline. This is definitely the sort of movie I'd like to see a lot more of. It also proves that they CAN make 'em like they used to.


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