Out of Sight
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

13 items from 2016


Berlin Film Review: ‘War on Everyone’

12 February 2016 1:00 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Everything “War on Everyone” writer-director John Michael McDonagh knows about United States law enforcement he must have learned watching ’70s cop shows, while the rest of his outlook on the American way of life may as well have been cribbed from vintage photographs and Glen Campbell records. Not a bad mix of influences for the wicked-dark Irish satirist to recombine for his virgin foray abroad, a talky, sexy, irreverent and ultimately somewhat surreal buddy-cop movie in which two detectives one suspension shy of early retirement stick their noses into the middle of a million-dollar heist, hoping to bust the criminals and keep the loot for themselves. While his American competition practices the right to remain silent, McDonagh writes his clever, coal-black heart out, delivering another firecracker script, whose explosively entertaining execution boasts considerably more commercial potential than his previous two indies, “Calvary” and “The Guard.”

On the good-cop/bad-cop continuum, »

- Peter Debruge

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Oscar Favorites Elbowed Aside for Rookie Writers in 2016 Race

9 February 2016 4:46 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Oscars’ current problems are a lot like baseball’s, back in the day. The game is too white, too macho and a little too overloaded with grizzled veterans for many fans’ comfort.

But encouraging signs can be spotted over in the writers’ division, where nine of this year’s 10 screenplay contenders were penned, in whole or in part, by first-time nominees.

Only Nick Hornby of “Brooklyn”; Ethan and Joel Coen of “Bridge of Spies”; Tom McCarthy of “Spotlight”; and Pete Docter of “Inside Out” have previously been named Oscar all-stars. Their writing partners and others, a remarkable 15 in all, are being called up to the Big Show for the first time. And that includes four women, the largest such number since 2007.

Maybe no one broke the color bar this year, but when it comes to new voices being heard, it’s truly the Year of the Rookie.

The rookies »

- Bob Verini

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Scott Frank Says His Long Developing Western 'Godless' Will Be A 6-Hour Netflix Miniseries

4 February 2016 10:58 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

If you need your daily reminder to never give up on your dreams, today's lesson comes from Scott Frank. The writer/director has no shortage of terrific credits to his name ("Minority Report," "Out Of Sight," "The Lookout," "Get Shorty"), but for over a decade, he's been looking to get his 1888-set western "Godless" made, in particular convincing directors to take it on, including Steven Soderbergh. Read More: Review: 'A Walk Among The Tombstones' Starring Liam Neeson And Dan Stevens "He didn't want to shoot people on horses," Frank told us in 2014 about Soderbergh turning down the gig, also adding that Sam Mendes had looked at the project too. "I begged him to direct it. And by the way —that's happened twice now. I wasn't going to direct 'The Lookout.' I had gone through two other directors, and the last one was [David] Fincher. When he left, I »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Scott Frank Says His Long Developing Western 'Godless' Will Be A 6-Hour Netflix Miniseries

4 February 2016 10:58 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

If you need your daily reminder to never give up on your dreams, today's lesson comes from Scott Frank. The writer/director has no shortage of terrific credits to his name ("Minority Report," "Out Of Sight," "The Lookout," "Get Shorty"), but for over a decade, he's been looking to get his 1888-set western "Godless" made, in particular convincing directors to take it on, including Steven Soderbergh. Read More: Review: 'A Walk Among The Tombstones' Starring Liam Neeson And Dan Stevens "He didn't want to shoot people on horses," Frank told us in 2014 about Soderbergh turning down the gig, also adding that Sam Mendes had looked at the project too. "I begged him to direct it. And by the way —that's happened twice now. I wasn't going to direct 'The Lookout.' I had gone through two other directors, and the last one was [David] Fincher. When he left, I »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Soderbergh Ends Retirement For Tatum Movie 'Lucky Logan'

4 February 2016 7:06 AM, PST | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

Well, that didn't take long...

Steven Soderbergh, best known for his Ocean's Eleven films, Traffic, and Sex, Lies, & Videotape, went into semi-retirement three years ago. It wasn't a total farewell to Hollywood. Soderbergh claimed he was done directing feature films, specifically. He'd still be around to produce, be a cinematographer, or possibly direct for television, but- for all intents and purposes- his time sitting in the director's chair for a major motion picture was over. 

Yeah, about that..

He's back.

According to Variety, Soderbergh read the script for the upcoming Channing Tatum vehicle Lucky Logan and simply fell in love with it. Between loving the script, and having a great working relationship with Tatum, he's reportedly ready to come out of retirement so that he can direct this film. The pair has previously worked together as actor and director for HaywireSide Effects, and Magic Mike

"That's great, Channing. Now »

- Mario-Francisco Robles

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How the Coen Brothers Survived Hollywood and Lived to Make ‘Hail, Caesar!’

3 February 2016 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Coen brothers are just as quirky as the characters from their movies. Just ask Josh Brolin, who has collaborated three times with the writer-directors, including on the upcoming “Hail, Caesar!” He recalls meeting the brothers on his “No Country for Old Men” audition, and not knowing what to do with the awkward silences. “Joel was intimidating,” Brolin says. “He didn’t say anything.” Months later, he was having dinner with Ethan, and noticed his friend continually glancing at his lap. “I looked down,” Brolin says. “He had been reading a book under the table. I was like, ‘Come on!’ ”

Photographed in New York City by François Dischinger for Variety

In this age of Twitter and Instagram, the directors of such beloved classics as “The Big Lebowski,” “Blood Simple” and “Raising Arizona” are still fairly private — and awkward with press interviews. Although they grew up together making films on their Super 8 cameras in Minnesota, »

- Ramin Setoodeh

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How I Shot That: Dp Elliot Davis on the Rigor and Speed it Took to Create 'The Birth of a Nation'

26 January 2016 10:34 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Sundance: 'The Birth of a Nation' Ignites a Bidding War After An Electrifying Premiere  Cinematographer Elliot Davis has shot more than 50 films, including "Twilight," "Out of Sight," "Thirteen," and "The Iron Lady." However, "The Birth of a Nation" presented a unique challenge: Not only was he responsible for realizing first-time director Nate Parker's exacting vision, he also had to do it while shooting faster than he'd ever done before.  Which camera and lens did you use? "Birth of a Nation" was shot on an Alexa, and it was almost shot exclusively with optimum zooms. At this point in my career, I'm really at the less is more stage, and so I really went with basically three lenses. Why was this the right camera kit for the job? Because it gives me the most flexibility. I'm prepared for handheld as well as any studio mode. I was probably »

- Dana Harris

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Ryan Coogler Accepts La Film Critics’ ‘Challenge’ and Issues His Own

10 January 2016 1:27 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“We may have cheated a bit in creating a film that has been called a love letter to journalism,” admitted “Spotlight” producer Blye Pagon Faust in accepting the drama’s best film honor at the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn.’s annual awards dinner Saturday night. It was a comment that summed up an evening where all the love from honorees was deflected right back to the critics and journalists in the room.

But “Creed” director Ryan Coogler took things a step further. In accepting the New Generation Award, an honor he was relieved didn’t carry a “best” connotation and accepted as a challenge to continue putting his voice into the world, the 29-year-old recalled the first time he ever saw a critic actually doing the work of film criticism. It was at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival, his first trip overseas. With a short film in tow, he found »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Anne V. Coates on Her First Editing Gig With 1952’s ‘The Pickwick Papers’

8 January 2016 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Anne V. Coates, who won an Oscar for editing “Lawrence of Arabia” and also cut “Becket,” “In the Line of Fire” and “Out of Sight,” will be feted with the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn.’s Career Achievement award Jan. 9. She received her first Variety mention in a review of Noel Langley’s 1952 Dickens adaptation, “The Pickwick Papers.”

One of your earliest experiences was at London’s Pinewood Studios. What was the first film you worked on there?

I was a second assistant on “The End of the River” (1947), working with Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger — starting out at the top, as it were. Michael and Emeric weren’t very pleased with what the editor was doing, so they hired Reggie Mills, their top editor, to do a recut. I worked with Reggie on it, which was a big break for me. I learned quite a lot.

How did you get your first editor credit? »

- Justin Chang

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Shades of Blue Premiere: Is J.Lo's New Drama Arresting — or a Cop-Out?

7 January 2016 7:59 PM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

“I always wanted to be a good cop — but there’s no straight line to that,” a banged-up, shaken Det. Harlee Santos confesses into her laptop in the opening scene of Shades of Blue.

There does, however, seem to be a decidedly direct line between the beats of NBC’s new Jennifer Lopez vehicle (which premiered Thursday night) and pretty much every movie and TV show ever written about morally murky police officers.

Related2016 Renewal Scorecard: What’s Coming Back? What’s Getting Cancelled? What’s on the Bubble?

Lopez’s Harlee is the kind of law enforcer who stops »

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Jennifer Lopez Is Better Than 'Shades of Blue'

7 January 2016 9:00 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

J.Lo's new character is a tough, complicated detective who slaps down bar pickup lines ("I don't do witty banter"), can hold her own in a fight -- and is as good at taking bribes as she is at protecting little kids from seeing bad things happen. On NBC's "Shades of Blue," her Harlee Santos seems, in the show's best moments, like a corrupt relative of her 1998 "Out of Sight" character Karen Sisco, which remains Lopez's best performance -- one I always hope she'd eventually prove wasn't a fluke. It's a welcome return to non-reality TV for the singer/actress, who hasn't done this (barring a couple of guest spots, including on "How I Met Your Mother") in two decades. And with the first two episodes directed by Barry Levinson, Lopez (and crime-show) fans have lots of reason for hope. Can we put "The Boy Next Door," "Maid in Manhattan »

- Sara Stewart

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Watch Rooney Mara, Cate Blanchett, Alicia Vikander, Domhnall Gleeson & More Discuss Their Favorite Sex Scenes

5 January 2016 1:58 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

You always remember your first time — watching a sex scene, that is. While the MPAA may still prefer violence-laden films over ones with even the briefest hint of sexuality, there’s no denying that some of cinema’s most memorable scenes involve lovemaking. Knowing this full well, W Magazine set out to poll dozens of top actors on their most memorable sex-scene-viewing experience, and today we have all the results.

The picks include Cate Blanchett‘s experience in third grade, Paul Dano on Notorious, Jennifer Jason Leigh picks In the Realm of the Senses and Don’t Look Now, Jake Gyllenhaal talks Out of Sight and Jerry Maguire, Alicia Vikander on seeing Blue Valentine alone, while Rooney Mara names Rust & Bone (and also talks her crying fit during Toy Story 3).

Meanwhile, Domhnall Gleeson opens up about directing his brother in an anal sex scene, Mya Taylor talks Titanic, Margot Robbie picks True Romance, »

- Leonard Pearce

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Review: Jennifer Lopez's 'Shades of Blue' has shades of much better cable dramas

5 January 2016 8:40 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Broadcast network dramas have it tough these days. It's not just that current cable and streaming shows can tell stories in bolder, more complicated, and more specific ways than all but a handful of network dramas are allowed to even shoot for, but that the best dramas ever made are now readily-available on one streaming service or another. Who's going to watch a watered-down network version of "The Shield," for instance, if the genuine article is only a Hulu click away? Yet NBC's trying exactly that with "Shades of Blue," which was ordered what feels like a decade ago (technically, it was early 2014), but held until now due to the busy schedule of star and producer Jennifer Lopez. J-Lo plays Harlee Santos, veteran Brooklyn cop who, along with her boss Matt Wozniak (Ray Liotta) and the rest of their crew (including "Sopranos" alum Drea de Matteo), supplements her NYPD salary with kickbacks, »

- Alan Sepinwall

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

13 items from 2016


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