Mission: Impossible II
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A Note Regarding Spoilers

The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags have been used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.

For detailed information about the amounts and types of (a) sex and nudity, (b) violence and gore, (c) profanity, (d) alcohol, drugs, and smoking, and (e) frightening and intense scenes in this movie, consult the IMDb Parents Guide for this movie. The Parents Guide for Mission: Impossible II can be found here.

Ethan Hunt's (Tom Cruise) mission, should he choose to accept it, is to retrieve and destroy the supply of a genetically-created disease called 'Chimera', which was developed by his old friend, Russian scientist Dr. Nekhorvich (Rade Serbedzija). Ethan's MI team consists of computer genius Luther Stickell, helicopter pilot Billy Baird (John Polson), and international thief Nyah Nordoff-Hall (Thandie Newton), ex-girlfriend of former IMF agent Sean Ambrose (Dougray Scott), who has already murdered Nekhorvich in order to obtain Bellerophon, the antidote, but he also needs Chimera because a cure without a disease is worthless.

No. Mission Impossible II is a sequel to Mission: Impossible (1996), which was based on a TV series also titled 'Mission: Impossible' that ran from 1966 to 1973 and was created and initially produced by American screenwriter Bruce Geller. Writing credits for MI-2 are credited to Robert Towne, Ronald Moore, and Brannan Braga. MI-2 was followed by two more sequels: Mission: Impossible III (2006) and Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol (2011). Mission: Impossible 5 is scheduled for release in 2015.

MI is set in 1996, evidenced by the timecode on the screen of the opening shot. MI-2 is set in 1999, evidenced on the newspaper used to blackmail the pharmaceutical company, Thus, it's a three year gap.

No. If you have just a smidgeon of knowledge about the workings of the IMF, based either on the TV series or on the previous movie, you will have no problem following MI-2. Both movies are missions unto themselves.

Nekhorvich felt that this was the most viable way of getting the virus to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, i.e., providing it with its optimum environment (in the human body), lessening the chances of losing or breaking a vial, contaminating others, and perhaps the virus being discovered in his baggage by customs agents. He also brought Bellerophon, the antidote, with him so that he could demonstrate to the CDC the effectiveness of the cure. Unfortunately, this is where Ambrose erred. He stole the briefcase containing the antidote, believing that it also held the virus.

Who is Dimitri?

Although no explanation is given in the movie, most viewers assume that 'Dimitri' was a codename that Ethan used on a past mission involving Nekhorvich.

Nyah is a former lover of Ambrose and walked out on him 6 months earlier. Swanbeck required Nyah for the mission, when Ambrose was suspected of masterminding the plane crash and the murder of Dr. Nekhorvich and stole the Chimera virus, when Ambrose disguised himself as Ethan and escorted Dr. Nekhorvich to Atlanta. Swanbeck wanted Nyah to reassume her relationship with the renegade IMF agent and report to Ethan, in order to recover the Chimera and bring Ambrose down and was their fastest chance of finding him. But Swanbeck misled Ethan as well as Nyah into believing Nyah was being recruited due to her skills as a professional thief and to steal back a stolen object and Ethan not knowing of Nyah and Ambrose's relationship and that the Chimera is a engineered virus.

How does the movie end?

Thanks to some fancy motorcycling, Ethan manages to outrun (or destroy) the cars of Ambrose's henchmen, but Ambrose himself takes up the chase on his cycle. Meanwhile, Nyah has made her way to the North Point bluffs with every intention of throwing herself to her death. With little time left on her 20-hour countdown, Ethan orders Luther and Billy to pick her up in their helicopter and bring her to him. Following a lengthy face-off in which Ethan ends up retrieving his gun from the sand and shooting Ambrose, he tosses a Belleraphon-filled syringe to Luther who injects it into Nyah. Several days later, Ethan meets with Mission Commander Swanbeck (Anthony Hopkins) who assures him that Nyah has recuperated and that her criminal record is expunged. In the final scene, Ethan and Nyah meet up in a park in Sydney and decide to continue their vacation somewhere where it's quiet.

His own gun. For the assault on Bare Island, Ethan carried two guns...a Beretta 92F carried in a shoulder holster and a H & K USP carried in a holster by the small of his back. When the two motorcycles crash, Hunt's USP falls onto the beach. When Hunt and Ambrose start fighting, there is a close-up of Hunt's Beretta falling out of his holster. This is the gun Ambrose finds at the end of the film. Hunt uses the other gun, the USP. There are many viewers who maintain that this is a continuity mistake and cite the fact that Hunt used TWO Berettas in the BioCyte shootout, not a Beretta and a USP. They say the gun Hunt fires at the end belongs to Ambrose, even though he was using a Browning BDA during the motorcycle chase. The decision to have Hunt use a different gun at the end was possibly taken to avoid confusion by having the two men fire the same model of gun. The shooting script states that the gun Hunt finds in the sand at the end of the film belongs to Hunt.

No. Despite being rated "15" (no persons admitted under 15 y/o), the version shown in British cinemas and released on DVD does not contain either the sound of neckbreaks, the shot of Hunt being kneecapped, the kick to the head, and other violence cut to appease the MPAA. It is the same as the PG-13 version shown in America.

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