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Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Jerry Lewis

Chicago – Jerry Lewis had a long and winding life, dying last week at the age of 91. Through that life he had many show business lives – including the inevitable addictions – surviving all of the them with his signature comic style. He also was featured in over 70 films, and HollywoodChicago.com remembers three of them.

Jerry Lewis in Chicago in 1996

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

When the gawky 19 year-old Lewis met the suave singer Dean Martin in 1946, little did they know that they would become the most popular act in America for several years, and make 16 films together between 1949 through 1956. Their box office draw was white-hot, so much so that neither of them could keep up with the blur of what happened to them. “Martin & Lewis” eventually broke up at the height of their fame in 1956, during which Martin famously said, “Jer, when I look at you,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

'The Zookeeper's Wife': Film Review

'The Zookeeper's Wife': Film Review
Uncomfortable as it is to admit, there have been so many mediocre Holocaust movies post-Schindler's List that a certain fatigue has set in.

Exceptions exist, of course — films like Roman Polanski's The Pianist or Lajos Koltai's Fateless, which, through their clarity of vision and lack of sentimentality, force us to see the horror with fresh eyes. But most screen depictions of this defining 20th-century atrocity, no matter their angle, rely on predictable emotional, visual and musical cues to coax the audience toward weepy catharsis (see: Life is Beautiful, Jakob the Liar, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, The Book Thief, Woman in...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Whoopi Goldberg Remembers Robin Williams: ‘He Was My Big Brother’

Whoopi Goldberg Remembers Robin Williams: ‘He Was My Big Brother’
Friends and family of Robin Williams gathered in New York City on Wednesday night to honor the late comedian and to mark the opening of a new acting center that bears his name.

“I think of him as my brother,” said Whoopi Goldberg, who partnered with Williams and Billy Crystal on a series of Comic Relief fundraising specials. “He was my big brother and the funniest person that I knew, and anybody that dared to be as free as he did, has a shot to be as good as he was. That’s the legacy. He dares you to be as good if you can be as free.”

Goldberg was joined at the event by Crystal, as well as Hank Azaria, Bonnie Hunt, Carol Kane, Marlo Thomas, Phil Donahue, and Barry Levinson, who directed Williams to an Oscar nomination in “Good Morning, Vietnam.”

Crystal told reporters that the occasion was a bittersweet one.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Patrick Wachsberger talks franchises, highlights and Polanski

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: “We’re going through a sea change,” Lionsgate executive says of the film business today.

This Sunday, industry veteran and sales supremo Patrick Wachsberger, co-chairman, Lionsgate Motion Picture Group, will be honoured at the Zurich Film Festival with the event’s Game Changer Award, which is bestowed on an individual who has been able to “successfully navigate through the aggressively changing entertainment landscape.”

Wachsberger’s more than 30-year navigation of those choppy waters has seen him play a pivotal role in two billion-dollar franchises, multiple Oscar and Palme d’Or campaigns and two of the industry’s most successful independent film companies of recent decades.

However, the film business is more unpredictable than ever claims the former Summit boss, who spoke to Screen shortly before the surprise news that fellow Lionsgate co-chair Rob Friedman is to leave the company.

“We’re going through a sea change,” says the energetic La-based Frenchman. “The business
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Patrick Wachsberger talks franchises, career highlights and the one that got away

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: “We’re going through a sea change,” Lionsgate executive says of the film business today.

This Sunday, industry veteran and sales supremo Patrick Wachsberger, co-chairman, Lionsgate Motion Picture Group, will be honoured at the Zurich Film Festival with the event’s Game Changer Award, which is bestowed on an individual who has been able to “successfully navigate through the aggressively changing entertainment landscape.”

Wachsberger’s more than 30-year navigation of those choppy waters has seen him play a pivotal role in two billion dollar franchises, multiple Oscar and Palme d’Or campaigns and two of the industry’s most successful independent film companies of recent decades.

However, the film business is more unpredictable than ever claims the former Summit boss, who spoke to Screen shortly before the surprise news that fellow Lionsgate co-chair Rob Friedman is to leave the company.

“We’re going through a sea change,” says the energetic La-based Frenchman. “The business
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin: Mozart Drama ‘Interlude in Prague’ to Star James Purefoy, Aneurin Barnard

Berlin: Mozart Drama ‘Interlude in Prague’ to Star James Purefoy, Aneurin Barnard
Berlin — A bevy of British talent is set to lead the cast in Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart drama “Interlude in Prague,” including James Purefoy (“Solomon Kane,” “John Carter,” “Ironclad”), Aneurin Barnard (“The White Queen,” “The Truth About Emanuel,” “Ironclad”) and “Les Miserables” star Samantha Barks. London-based Carnaby will handle worldwide rights for the film, which will be presented to buyers at Berlin’s European Film Market.

Directed by John Stephenson (“Animal Farm,” “Five Children and It”) with a screenplay by Brian Ashby, “Interlude in Prague” is produced by Productive International’s Huw Penallt Jones (“The Man Who Knew Infinity,” “The Edge of Love,” “Cold Mountain,” “Chaos”) along with Hannah Leader (“Lucky Number Slevin,” “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead”) with cinematography by Michael Brewster (“Five Children and It,” “Animal Farm”), production design by Oscar winner Luciana Arrighi (“Only You,” “The Man Who Knew Infinity,” “Jakob the Liar”) and Hybrid’s
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ten Oscar-Nommed Foreign-Language Films About Jewish WWII Experiences

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

Set in 1960s Poland, Pawel Pawlikowski’s black-and-white drama Ida focuses on faith and identity after family secrets are revealed. Anna (Agata Trzebuchowska) is a young orphan brought up in a convent preparing to take her vows to become a nun. When told she must visit her aunt, her only living relative, Anna discovers she’s Jewish, her name is actually Ida and her parents were killed in WWII. Anna/Ida and her aunt embark on a journey to learn more about the family’s history and discover the truth about what happened.

The film landed on the Oscar shortlist for best foreign-language film and was nominated for a Golden Globe in the same category.

A number of foreign films focused on WWII have done well at the Oscars throughout the years. Ones based on real events include The Counterfeiters (2007), about the Nazis’ attempt to
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

An emotional 'Ask Drew' looks back at the life and work of the great Robin Williams

  • Hitfix
An emotional 'Ask Drew' looks back at the life and work of the great Robin Williams
"Suicide is a permanent solution to temporary problems." - Robin Williams, "World's Greatest Dad" This is a very emotional "Ask Drew." This is, I would suspect, the closest you're ever going to see to me losing it on camera completely. I guess I shouldn't have been surprised when there was a Robin Williams question, since it's still so fresh and so raw for so many people, but I couldn't have known just how hard it would be to talk about him. I mean, I have stared at the blinking cursor on my blank document page for almost two days now, grappling with one question: how in the hell do you even remotely begin to sum up someone as huge as Robin Williams? We could start from the personal angle. I could tell you about the occasional e-mails I got from him when I was at Ain't It Cool, or the
See full article at Hitfix »

Robin Williams Remembered: A Moviegoer’s Greatest Dad

Robin Williams Remembered: A Moviegoer’s Greatest Dad
It seems entirely appropriate that my first viewing of “Aladdin” (1992) remains one of my most vivid impressions of Robin Williams onscreen, even if isn’t actually Robin Williams onscreen. Or is it? Animation, allowing for all manner of strange transformations and surreal flights of fancy, was in some ways an ideal medium for this endlessly inventive performer, and in this spirited Disney fantasy it granted him a funnyman showcase of inexhaustible cleverness and dexterity. For someone who was only 9 at the time, it also provided an early understanding of what people meant when they talked about “a Robin Williams performance.” To see and hear that big blue Genie today — morphing from one form to the next with dizzying speed, tossing off merry quips, goofy accents and fourth-wall-shattering asides — is to behold a rapid-fire comic imagination fully liberated from the dull, colorless parameters of live-action. Here, at last, was a movie
See full article at Variety - Film News »

How Robin Williams Inspired a Generation to Seize the Day

How Robin Williams Inspired a Generation to Seize the Day
It was “Dead Poets Society” that did it. That was the movie that pushed me over the edge from casual moviegoer to full-blown film junkie, the one that sent me back to the video store night after night looking for my next fix, desperate to discover other movies that could make me feel the same way.

There, in the role that earned Robin Williams his second Oscar nomination, was the full range of the actor’s incredible talent: He could have you laughing hysterically one minute and crying the next, often within the span of a single film.

At the moment movies mattered most in my life, Robin Williams was my favorite actor. Let me assure you, Oscar nomination or not, this was not a popular position at the time — nor is it now. Here was a high-energy actor who had gotten his start playing a spastic alien on “Mork and Mindy,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Top 10 Trivial Tidbits About Robin Williams (1951-2014)

Oscar-winning actor and comedian Robin Williams (1951-2014) has left behind a legacy of memorable entertainment in stand-up comedy, television and film following in the aftermath of his tragic passing on Monday, August 11, 2014. Indeed, Williams will be remembered for his versatile presence in show business running the course of over four decades.

In a rather unconventional tribute of recognizing the late and gifted actor/comedian Robin Williams let us engage in The Top 10 Trivial Tidbits About Robin Williams (1951-2014) highlighting the performer’ s arcane facts and revelations pertaining to his film and television work.

So just how well do you know Robin Williams and his esteemed Hollywood career throughout the years in the media? Just sit back and enjoy this brain-teasing trivia-minded column about the dearly departed manic artist whose devotion to his craft of off-kilter comedic and shockingly dramatic showmanship on the small and big screen has and will always
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Oscars 1999 Revisited

After the Academy Award for Best Song was won by ‘It’s Hard Out Here For a Pimp’ at the 2006 Oscars, host Jon Stewart quipped, ‘For those of you who are keeping score at home, I just want to make something very clear: Martin Scorsese, zero Oscars; Three 6 Mafia, one.’

If the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences specialises in one thing at a sophisticated level no other collaborative body could ever hope to match, it’s giving awards to the wrong people. Sometimes, it almost seems like a deliberate act of petulance. Try finding anyone outside of Robert Zemekis’s immediate family who considers Forrest Gump to be a better picture than Pulp Fiction (one win) or The Shawshank Redemption (IMDb’s Best Film Ever Made; no wins).

In 1999, The 71st Academy Awards became to many people, the apogee of undeserved Oscars and the rabid invective from
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Ben Affleck, Alan Arkin, John Goodman and Bryan Cranston, to receive the “Hollywood Ensemble Acting Award” for “Argo” by Josh Abraham

HollywoodNews.com: The 16th Annual Hollywood Film Awards, presented by the Los Angeles Times, is pleased to announce that the feature "Argo," directed by Ben Affleck, will receive the "Hollywood Ensemble Acting Award." "We are very proud to recognize the ensemble cast of "Argo," for their dramatic and outstanding performances," said Carlos de Abreu, Founder and Executive Director of the Hollywood Film Awards. The 2012 Hollywood Film Awards has also announced that it will honor director David O. Russell with the "Hollywood Director Award"; Oscar-winning actor Robert De Niro with the "Hollywood Supporting Actor Award"; Academy Award-winning actress Marion Cotillard with the "Hollywood Actress Award"; three-time Academy Award-nominated actress Amy Adams with the "Hollywood Supporting Actress Award"; producers Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner with the "Hollywood Producers Award"; writer/director Judd Apatow with the "Hollywood Comedy Award"; actor John Hawkes with the "Hollywood Breakout Performance Award" for "The Sessions"; and Quvenzhané Wallis
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Vulture Recommends: Five Songs to Listen To

  • Vulture
Vulture Recommends: Five Songs to Listen To
Every two weeks, Vulture music critic Nitsuh Abebe will drop his Songs on Repeat list — composed of the five tunes that he can't seem to get out of his head. This week, there's some R. Kelly and one track named after a Robin Williams movie. (It's not Jakob the Liar, no.) 1. Kitty Pryde’s “Okay Cupid”Look, it’s possible you’ll soon read a lot of strange things about this young Florida redhead and her cloudy, weedy raps. My advice will be to maintain perspective and appreciate this stuff for what it is — dreamlike pop music, wry Internet ephemera, weirdly gorgeous renderings of teenage intimacy, and nothing at all that requires hand-wringing about the whole concept of hip-hop. 2. Cocorosie’s “We Are on Fire”Followers of this eccentric sister act might be surprised by how much of a pop song this is, right down to the big, hooky chorus.
See full article at Vulture »

In Darkness uses a fragment of the Holocaust story to hint at its enormity

Agnieszka Holland's film uses a fragment of the Holocaust story to hint at its enormity

Claude Lanzmann's famous proscription against ever tackling the Holocaust in a purely representational way – because how can one honestly, decently recreate the almost unimaginable without cheapening or faking it? – still casts a shadow over the whole genre three decades after the release of his documentary Shoah. I wish more people would listen to him. His polar opposite is Steven Spielberg, and Schindler's List neatly embodies all Lanzmann's doubts. The documentary favours long takes, no heroes, and no war-crime footage whatsoever. The feature shows it all: random executions, gas chambers, the anguish of the doomed, but undercuts it all with a Spielbergian hunger for uplift and good guys.

The Holocaust movie has taken some odd turns in the years since Shoah and Schindler established these parameters. We were favoured with those "Have Yourself a
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hot Rods & Droids: A George Lucas Profile (Part 4)

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of legendary filmmaker George Lucas in the fourth of a six part feature... read parts one, two and three.

For over a decade filmmaker George Lucas had been developing a project which was a gender reversal of the Biblical story about Moses being hidden as a baby in the bulrushes. When asked to describe Willow (1988), Lucas called it “an adventure fantasy that takes place a long time ago in a mythical land.” Cast as the title character who becomes the guardian and defender of the wayward baby from an evil sorceress was Warwick Davis who made a name for himself playing the Ewok known as Wicket. “I was on holiday in southwest England when I got a call from George to come to Elstree – one of the major British studios – and audition for the part,” remembers Davis. “Actually, I did four auditions altogether; three in England and one in America.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Man and His Dream: A Francis Ford Coppola Profile (Part 4)

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of legendary filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola in the fourth of a five-part feature... read parts one, two and three.

“[Preston Tucker] developed plans for a car way ahead of its time in terms of engineering; yet the auto industry at large stubbornly resisted his innovative ideas,” remarked moviemaker Francis Ford Coppola who wanted to do a musical on the life and times of the post-World War II maverick car designer with Leonard Bernstein composing the music. The project was stalled with the financial collapse of Coppola’s studio. “I thought it was the best project Francis had ever been involved with,” stated filmmaker George Lucas (American Graffiti). “No studio in town would touch it; they all said it was too expensive. They all wanted $15 million Three Men and a Baby [1987] movies or Crocodile Dundee, Part 73 sequels.” Lucas agreed to provide the funding for the $24 million budget which
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Monday Night Poll: Is Zach Galifianakis On the Brink of Overexposure?

Monday Night Poll: Is Zach Galifianakis On the Brink of Overexposure?
I saw Dinner for Schmucks this weekend, and one of the many trailers before the movie was for It's Kind of a Funny Story. Story is about Craig, a teen who suffers from depression and signs himself into a mental ward, where he finds insight, love, etc.. You can watch the trailer here.

It stars Keir Gilchrist as Craig, Emma Roberts as Noelle, the self-loathing love interest, and Zach Galifianakis as Bobby, a wacky older guy who takes Craig under his wing. (I can't wait to see what kind of problems they saddle Noelle with, since in the trailer she asks Craig if he thinks she's "gross-looking." Awesome! Eating disorder? Cutter? Borderline personality disorder? I bet Craig helps heal her with his love and acceptance because he's sensitive and stuff.)

It looks funny and poignant until it gets to the point where we get a sense of the pain behind Bobby's facade.
See full article at Cinematical »

Anna Faris Gets Kidnapped In Wedding Banned

Remember when Robin Williams used to go dramatic? He gave us beautiful performances in Good Will Hunting andDead Poets Society. Hell, I even dug Jakob the Liar. The dude seems to have a good sense of what it takes to dig down deep and pull out a tough performance, even if it doesn.t match up perfectly with his comedic persona. Well, with movies like Old Dogs, those days seem to be long gone. In his upcoming Wedding Banned, Robin Williams will play a husband who teams up with his ex-wife to kidnap their daughter and convince her not to get married. Sounds like a grand old time, right? Now THR reports that Anna Faris has signed on to play the bride-to-be. Jack Amiel and Michael Begler penned the script. These are the guys behind Raising Helen and The Shaggy Dog, so you know it.ll be good. After Observe
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Robin Williams's Wife Files for Divorce

Robin Williams's wife has filed for divorce after 19 years of marriage, the actor's rep, Mara Buxbaum, has confirmed to People. Marsha Garces Williams filed a divorce petition in San Francisco on March 21, citing irreconcilable differences, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. The pair have two children together: daughter Zelda, 18, and son Cody, 16. Garces, 51, and Williams, 56, wed in April 1989, shortly after the actor's divorce from his previous wife.According to the eight-page court filing, Garces is asking for joint legal custody of Cody – that the boy live with her and Williams get visitation – as well as payment of attorney fees
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

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