Frida (2002) - News Poster

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Fashion Flashback: Salma Hayek Dissects Her Favorite Oscar Red Carpet Looks

Fashion Flashback: Salma Hayek Dissects Her Favorite Oscar Red Carpet Looks
When Salma Hayek came to the States, she faced a lot of rejection. “I was rejected over and over, and everybody told me, ‘You will never make it in this town. You’re Mexican, you have an accent,’” she says. Nevertheless, she persisted, and with 2002’s “Frida,” Hayek became the first and only Mexican woman to be nominated in the lead actress category — and the iconic painter remains her biggest artistic inspiration. “I learned that this woman woke up every morning with pain,” says Hayek, who shows an empathetic side in “Beatriz at Dinner.” “[Frida Kahlo] had so many things going against her, and yet she found a will to say, ‘I am my best work of art.’”

1997

Hayek’s first time presenting at the Oscars was a milestone. “Not everybody wanted to give a dress to the new Mexican girl, and I couldn’t afford one, so I was very lucky that Giorgio Armani offered,” says [link=nm
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gloria Steinem to be played by Carey Mulligan and Julianne Moore

by Murtada

2018 might become the year of Gloria Steinem at the movies. We’ve already told you about Dee Rees’ plans to make a film about the feminist movement’s fight to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, An Uncivil War. The project has lead parts for Steinem, activist Flo Kennedy and fundamentalist organizer Phyllis Schlafly. Rees has decided to continue collaborating with her Mudbound star Carey Mulligan and cast her as Steinem.

Director Julie Taymor (Frida, Across the Universe) and Playwright Sarah Ruhl will adapt Steinem’s memoir My Life on The Road. Their choice for the lead part is Julianne Moore. It looks like the Rees/Mulligan project will go before the cameras first, in March 2018. The Taymor/Moore film is still at the writing stage.

There is no reason why both movies could not be successful as they're telling different stories. One is about a particular moment in
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The Hitman’S Bodyguard Starring Ryan Reynolds and Samuel L. Jackson Arrives 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray Combo Pack, and DVD November 21st

Leading an all-star cast, Ryan Reynolds (Deadpool, The Proposal) and Samuel L. Jackson (Pulp Fiction, Marvel’s Cinematic Universe) take viewers on an outrageous action-packed, comedic adventure in The Hitman’s Bodyguard, arriving on Digital HD November 7 and 4K Blu-ray Combo Pack (plus Blu-ray and Digital HD), Blu-ray™ Combo Pack (plus DVD and Digital HD), DVD and On Demand November 21 from Lionsgate. When Michael Bryce, an elite bodyguard, and Darius Kincaid, a renowned hit man, are forced to work together, they don’t just have to avoid getting killed…they also have to avoid killing each other. The film, which was #1 at the summer box office three weeks in a row, also stars Oscar nominees Gary Oldman (2011, Best Actor, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy) and Salma Hayek (2002, Best Actress, Frida).

The world’s top protection agent (Reynolds) is called upon to guard the life of his mortal enemy,
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Julianne Moore To Play Gloria Steinem In ‘My Life On The Road’

  • The Playlist
At this particular moment, the cinema world could use a few more real-life, inspirational female heroes. And new biopic is on the way about one of the leading voices of modern feminism.

Deadline reports that Julianne Moore has signed up to play Gloria Steinem in “My Life On The Road.” Julie Taymor (“Frida“) will direct the script by Sarah Ruhl, which is based on Steinem’s memoir, and will chronicle her life as an activist and spokeswoman for a movement and her influence on an entire generation of women.

Continue reading Julianne Moore To Play Gloria Steinem In ‘My Life On The Road’ at The Playlist.
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Julianne Moore To Play Gloria Steinem In June Pictures’ ‘My Life On The Road’

  • Deadline
Julianne Moore To Play Gloria Steinem In June Pictures’ ‘My Life On The Road’
Exclusive: Julianne Moore will star as iconic feminist activist Gloria Steinem in My Life On The Road, the June Pictures film that Julie Taymor will direct. Playwright Sarah Ruhl is writing the coming of age story, based on Steinem's bestselling memoir. Deadline recently revealed the project and the attachment of Taymor, who directed Frida, Across the Universe and Titus for the screen and The Lion King and Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark on Broadway. Now, the company has an…
See full article at Deadline »

Julie Taymor To Receive Sdcf’s 2018 Mr. Abbott Award

Taymor: Marco Grob

Julie Taymor is set to add another award to her stacked résumé. The Tony-winning director of “The Lion King” will be honored with the Stage Directors and Choreographers Foundation’s (Sdcf) 2018 Mr. Abbott Award, BroadwayWorld reports. Named after the late director George Abbott (“The Pajama Game”), the accolade is presented to a director or choreographer who has made “extraordinary contributions” to the profession.

Taymor will take home the award at the Sdcf’s annual gala on April 2, 2018 in New York City.

“I am so pleased that Sdc Foundation is honoring Julie Taymor with this year’s ‘Mr. Abbott’ Award,” said Stage Directors and Choreographers Society prez Pam MacKinnon. “Her inventive, imaginative, and daringly theatrical work across media has inspired and touched generations of artists and audiences. Her legacy continues to be written, and I always look forward to seeing what’s next from this incomparable and history-making artist.”

Abbott’s widow, Joy, recalled, “George and I met Julie about 25 years ago in Philadelphia, and even then he recognized her creative talent, her originality, and vision. I think that George would have been deeply moved to know Julie is being honored with his namesake award. She is truly a renaissance woman of the theater.”

Previous Mr. Abbott honorees include Graciela Daniele (“The Visit”), Agnes De Mille (“Brigadoon”), Lynne Meadow (“Linda”), and Susan Stroman (“The Producers”).

With her “Lion King” win, Taymor made history as the first woman to receive the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical. “Grounded,” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” and “Juan Darien: A Carnival Mass” are among her other theater credits. She’s also helmed feature films such as “Frida” and “Across the Universe.” Taymor is currently directing a Broadway revival of “M Butterfly.” Next, she’ll direct the screen adaptation of Gloria Steinem’s memoir, “My Life on the Road.”

Earlier this month Taymor was presented with one of the Trailblazer Awards at Women and Hollywood’s 10th anniversary celebration in New York. She was honored alongside directors Amma Asante (“Belle”) and Julie Dash (“Daughters of the Dust,” “Queen Sugar”), producer and GameChanger Films president Mynette Louie, and HBO Documentary Films president Sheila Nevins.

Julie Taymor To Receive Sdcf’s 2018 Mr. Abbott Award was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Women and Hollywood Announces 10th Anniversary Trailblazer Award Winners

Patty Jenkins and Gal Gadot on the set “Wonder Woman”: Warner Bros. Entertainment and THR

Women and Hollywood is honored to share the recipients of the Trailblazer Awards, which will be given out during our upcoming 10th Anniversary events in New York and Los Angeles.

The New York Trailblazer Awardees are directors Amma Asante (“Belle,” “Where Hands Touch”), Julie Dash (“Daughters of the Dust,” “Queen Sugar”), and Julie Taymor (“The Lion King,” “Frida”) as well as producer and GameChanger Films president Mynette Louie and HBO Documentary Films president Sheila Nevins. They will be honored October 17 at the Time Warner Center in NYC.

Our Los Angeles Trailblazers include directors Patty Jenkins (“Wonder Woman,” “Monster”), Haifaa al-Mansour (“Wadjda,” “Mary Shelley”), and Angela Robinson (“Professor Marston and the Wonder Women,” “D.E.B.S.”). Director Leah Meyerhoff (“I Believe in Unicorns”) is being honored for founding Film Fatales. Other honorees include the Aclu; Melissa Goodman, Audrey Irmas director of the Lgbtq, Gender and Reproductive Justice Project at Aclu of SoCal, and ​Lenora Lapidus, Director of the Women’s Rights Project at the Aclu, will be accepting. And the founder of the Media, Diversity, & Social Change Initiative, Dr. Stacy L. Smith, will also be recognized. They will receive their awards on October 25 at the ArcLight Theatre in Hollywood.

These are women who through their work, their voice, and/or their activism have been a part of raising the level of conversation on gender equality, stepping up the advocacy drumbeat, and paving the way for their female peers and colleagues.

To find out more about the Trailblazers, check out their bios below. And, remember, tickets are still available for our anniversary events in NY on October 17 and in La on October 25.

Amma Asante

Amma Asante, MBE is a multi-award winning writer and director who won a BAFTA for her first film, A Way of Life. This made Asante the first Black female director to win a BAFTA Film Award for writing and directing a film. Her next film, Belle, drew widespread critical acclaim, and saw Asante named one of CNN’s Leading Women of 2014, as well as being named by Variety as one of their 10 Directors to watch. In 2016, her film A United Kingdom was released and its European Premiere saw Asante celebrated as the first Black female director to open the BFI London Film Festival in its 60-year history. This year Asante was named an MBE by Queen Elizabeth on the 2017 Birthday Honour’s list, for services to film as a writer and director. Asante is currently in post-production on her next film, Where Hands Touch. The film, inspired by historical events, is set in 1944 Germany and follows the plight of a young girl of color attempting to survive under Nazi rule.

Julie Dash

Twenty-six years ago, filmmaker Julie Dash broke through racial and gender boundaries with her Sundance award-winning film (Best Cinematography) Daughters of the Dust, and she became the first African American woman to have a wide theatrical release of her feature film. In 2004, The Library of Congress placed Daughters of the Dust in the National Film Registry where it joins a select group of American films preserved and protected as national treasures by the Librarian of Congress. Dash is the only African American woman with a feature film that has been inducted into the National Film Registry. She is the recent recipient of the New York Film Critics Special Award, the 2017 Robert Smalls Merit and Achievement Award, and the Visionary Award from Women in Film, Washington, D.C. Dash is currently a Distinguished Professor of Art at Spelman College. She recently directed multiple episodes of the award-winning dramatic series, Queen Sugar, Season 2, created and produced by Ava DuVernay and Oprah Winfrey, for Own Television.

Mynette Louie

Mynette Louie is a New York-based film producer and the president of Gamechanger Films, the first equity fund to exclusively finance narrative features directed by women. Gamechanger’s films include Natalia Garagiola’s Hunting Season (Venice Critics’ Week 2017), Lauren Wolkstein & Christopher Radcliff’s The Strange Ones (SXSW 2017), Sarah Adina Smith’s Buster’s Mal Heart (Tiff 2016), and So Yong Kim’s Lovesong (Sundance 2016, 2017 Independent Spirit Award nominee), among others. Louie won the 2013 Independent Spirit Piaget Producers Award and was named one of Ted Hope’s “21 Brave Thinkers of Truly Free Film” and one of Indiewire’s “100 Filmmakers to Follow on Twitter.” She is on the Board of Directors of Film Independent and serves as an advisor to the Sundance Institute, SXSW, Ifp, and A3 Asian American Artists Foundation.

Sheila Nevins

Credit: Brigitte Lacombe

Sheila Nevins is president, HBO Documentary Films, responsible for overseeing the development and production of all documentaries for HBO, HBO2, and Cinemax. As an executive producer or producer, she has received 32 Primetime Emmy Awards, 34 News and Documentary Emmys, and 42 George Foster Peabody Awards. During her tenure, HBO’s critically acclaimed documentaries have gone on to win 26 Academy Awards, the most recent of which was A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness in 2016. Nevins has been honored with several prestigious career achievement awards including, most recently, the 2009 Governors Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. She has supervised the production of more than 1,000 documentary programs for HBO. Nevins is the bestselling author of You Don’t Look Your Age… and Other Fairy Tales, published by Flatiron Books.

Julie Taymor

Credit: Marco Grob

Julie Taymor became the first woman to win the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical, and won a Tony for Best Costumes, for her landmark production of The Lion King. The Lion King has gone on to become the most successful stage musical of all time: 24 global productions have been seen by more than 90 million people. Her credits also include Broadway’s Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, The Green Bird, and Juan Darien: A Carnival Mass (five Tony nominations). She directed the play Grounded, and completed a cinematic version of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, filmed during the production at Theatre for a New Audience in Brooklyn. Film credits include Titus, Frida, Across the Universe, and The Tempest. Operas include Oedipus Rex, The Flying Dutchman, Salome, The Magic Flute, and Grendel, composed by Elliot Goldenthal. Taymor is a recipient of the 1991 MacArthur Genius Award and a 2015 inductee into the Theater Hall of Fame for Lifetime Achievement. She is currently in rehearsals for a revival of M Butterfly starring Clive Owen on Broadway.

Melissa Goodman

Melissa Goodman conducts legal and policy advocacy concerning Lgbtq rights, reproductive rights, gender equality, and the rights of people with HIV. Goodman leads the Aclu SoCal’s advocacy to end discrimination against women directors and increase inclusive hiring in Hollywood, to protect the rights of transgender students and adults, to expand access to quality and confidential reproductive healthcare, to increase protections for working parents, to end bias and over-policing and over-incarceration of Lgbtq people, and to improve healthcare for incarcerated women.

​Lenora Lapidus

Lenora Lapidus litigates gender discrimination cases in courts throughout the country, engages in public policy advocacy, and speaks on gender equity issues in the media and to the public. Her work focuses on economic justice, educational equity, ending gender-based violence, and women in the criminal justice system. Along with Melissa Goodman of the Aclu of Southern CA, she urged the Eeoc to investigate the low number of women hired by studios to be directors for film and television. Lapidus has received several fellowships and awards, including 21 Leaders for the 21st Century from Women’s eNews and the Wasserstein Fellowship for outstanding public interest lawyers from Harvard Law School.

Patty Jenkins

Credit: Warner Bros.

Patty Jenkins is a writer and director best known for directing Warner Bros. and DC ComicsWonder Woman, her debut feature Monster, based on the life of convicted serial killer Aileen Wuornos, and helming the pilot episode of AMC’s hit show The Killing. Monster was named by AFI as one of its Ten Best Films of the Year. Jenkins garnered a number of awards and nominations, including winning Best First Feature at the 2004 Independent Spirit Awards. She went on to direct many commercials and TV programs including the pilot and finale episode for AMC’s The Killing, for which she received an Emmy nomination, and won the DGA award for best dramatic directing. Jenkins directed several other pilots and episodes including Fox’s Arrested Development and HBO’s Entourage. She was nominated for an Emmy for a segment of Lifetime’s Five, an anthology about breast cancer.

In 2017, Jenkins broke the record for biggest grossing live-action film directed by a woman, domestic and worldwide, with Wonder Woman. The film simultaneously smashed box office records and received critical acclaim and it has grossed a worldwide total of more than $820 million to date. ​

Haifaa al-Mansour

Haifaa al-Mansour is the first female filmmaker in Saudi Arabia and is regarded as one of its most significant cinematic figures. She studied comparative literature at the American University in Cairo and completed a Master’s degree in Film Studies from the University of Sydney. The success of her 2005 documentary Women Without Shadows influenced a new wave of Saudi filmmakers and made the issue of opening cinemas in the Kingdom front-page news. At home, her work is both praised and vilified for encouraging discussion on taboo issues and for penetrating the wall of silence surrounding the sequestered lives of Saudi women. Wadjda, al-Mansour’s feature debut, is the first feature film shot entirely in Saudi Arabia and the first by a female director. The film received wide critical acclaim after its premiere at the 2012 Venice Film Festival and established al-Mansour as an important talent emerging from the Arab World. She recently published a novelization of the film titled The Green Bicycle for Penguin publishing group. Her latest film, Mary Shelley, starring Elle Fanning and based on the life of Frankenstein author Mary Shelley, recently premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Leah Meyerhoff

Leah Meyerhoff is an award-winning filmmaker whose debut narrative feature film I Believe in Unicorns was released theatrically in 2015 after premiering at SXSW, winning the Grand Jury Prize at the Atlanta Film Festival and additional awards from Woodstock Film Festival, Nashville Film Festival, First Time Fest, Tribeca Film Institute, Ifp, Nyu, and the Adrienne Shelly Foundation. Meyerhoff is also the founder of Film Fatales, a female filmmaker organization based in New York with dozens of local chapters around the world. Film Fatales is a global community of women feature film and television directors who meet regularly to mentor each other, share resources, collaborate on projects, and build a supportive environment in which to get their films made and seen. Founded in 2013, Film Fatales actively supports over 500 women directors in New York and Los Angeles, and hundreds more in a dozen sister cities across Europe, North America, Australia, and Africa.

Angela Robinson

Angela Robinson is a filmmaker who explores and exposes the breadth and complexity of humanity in an extensive body of work across both film and television. Filtering her storytelling through the multi-faceted prism of identity, Robinson uses the power of her unique voice to intelligently and empathetically bring compelling, intersectional stories — specifically those of women, people of color, and Lgbtq individuals — to the mainstream in a way that is entertaining, emotional, and thought-provoking. Most recently, Robinson wrote and directed Professor Marston and the Wonder Women, the origin story behind one of the world’s most famous superheroes, Wonder Woman.

Moving fluidly between film and television, Robinson has an overall deal with ABC Television Studios and recently served as a Consulting Producer on ABC’s hit series “How to Get Away with Murder.” She is in development on a series exploring the intersecting lives of Golden Age stars Greta Garbo and Marlene Dietrich.

Stacy L. Smith, Ph.D.

Stacy L. Smith is the Founder and Director of the Media, Diversity, & Social Change Initiative, the leading think tank globally studying issues of inequality in entertainment. Mdsc research focuses on inclusion in film, television, and digital media and all facets of the music industry. Dr. Smith has written over 100 journal articles, book chapters, and reports on media content patterns and effects. She was the principal investigator of the Card report, examining Hollywood’s hiring practices on screen, behind the camera, and in the executive ranks across the major media companies and digital distribution platforms. Dr. Smith speaks routinely on issues of inequality. She has given a Ted Talk and spoken at the United Nations, the White House, Sundance Film Festival, Promax, and Lunafest. Dr. Smith’s work was the basis for the EPiX docuseries, 4%: Film’s Gender Problem.

Women and Hollywood Announces 10th Anniversary Trailblazer Award Winners was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Catherine Gund and Daresha Kyi on Celebrating a “Badass Butch” in “Chavela”

Chavela”: Alicia Perez-­Duarte/Courtesy of Music Box Films

Catherine Gund is an Emmy-nominated producer, director, writer, and activist. Her media work focuses on strategic and sustainable social transformation, arts and culture, HIV/AIDS and reproductive health, and the environment. Her films — which include “Dispatches from Cleveland,” “Born to Fly,” and “What’s On Your Plate?” — have screened around the world in festivals, theaters, museums, and schools, and on PBS, the Discovery Channel, and the Sundance Channel. She is the Founder and Director of Aubin Pictures.

Daresha Kyi is an award-winning filmmaker and television producer with over 25 years in the business. A graduate of Nyu Film School, she won a full fellowship from TriStar Pictures to attend the Directors Program at The American Film Institute (AFI) based on her multiple award-winning short film “Land Where My Fathers Died,” which she wrote, produced, directed and co-starred in with Isaiah Washington. She recently served as executive producer of the award-winning short “Thugs, The Musical.”

Chavela” opens October 4 in NYC, and October 6 in La and San Francisco.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

CG: Chavela’s voice and her singular magic transcends space and time, wrenching our souls, tapping into our deepest grief, and our most radiant immortalizing love. She was a badass butch who lived for nearly a century, firmly weaving her own story into the ancestral lines of Latin folks, queers, and women from across the generations who are living today.

Dk: “Chavela” is a loving depiction of a badass outsider who dared to stand in her truth at a time when it wasn’t just unpopular, but downright dangerous to be an out, proud lesbian. She sang from the depths of her soul and moved audiences to tears with the raw power of her emotions. This trailblazing rebel defied the social norms and lived life as if it were a rollercoaster ride — soaring to great heights, and plunging into profound chasms — and turned it all into art.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

CG: When my best friend, who was Chicano, died of AIDS in 1990, I fled to Mexico and was introduced to Chavela Vargas’ songs by my new friends who revered her. They saw my video camera, my constant companion, as I captured her concerts in a small hall, and they were determined to interview her.

She invited us to her home in Ahuatepec. The resulting footage sat in my closet in a box for over 20 years. I realize now that Chavela had to finish writing her story so that this film could tell it.

Her music moved me in 1991 and her music moves me today. But her soul and her choices in life are what truly rattle my core, reminding me constantly to live my one life as honestly and fiercely as I possibly can.

Dk: I love stories about underdogs who triumph against all odds. Chavela started her career as a homeless runaway who sang on the streets of Mexico City to survive and went on to win a Lifetime Achievement Grammy Award, sell out Carnegie Hall, and serve as a muse to Pedro Almodóvar. It doesn’t get more inspiring than that!

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

CG: I want people to feel love, honestly. I want them to feel like difference is positive, enriching, and generative. I want them to believe in themselves and all of those around them. I want them to know that we each have something to contribute.

Chavela motivates those of us who discover her to fuel our own desires, to transform ourselves into our most honest, brave, and emotional selves.

I want viewers to choose Chavela’s songs when they’re picking the soundtrack of their lives because she transcends and creates empathy, and there will only be justice when there is empathy.

Dk: I hope people walk away knowing that it’s never too late to achieve their dreams and that they feel inspired to stand even more firmly in their individual truths, whatever they may be.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

CG: There was so little that got in our way. Chavela blessed this project from day one, 26 years ago. I believe Chavela felt comfortable, different, and engaged by the circle of young lesbians who carried on that conversation with her while I filmed in 1991. She had a reputation for being blunt and cranky, but to us, she expressed her magic, her spirituality, her truth as she spoke about feminism, identity, aging, and love.

Her generosity, brilliance, and candor stuck with me through to the end of the filmmaking process. In fact, I feel like she kept appearing: guiding, sometimes dictating, laughing, promising, consoling, saving me again and again. Full gratitude and recognition to Chavela for making this film with me!

Dk: In terms of the creative process, Chavela lived such a full, fascinating life and accomplished so much that it was challenging to decide which aspects of her story should be left out of the film. For example, we were convinced from the very beginning that her participation in the movie “Frida” with Salma Hayek would be a crucial element in the film, but we wound up discarding it completely.

This process of “killing our babies” was sometimes painful, but since the film is 90 minutes long and Chavela lived to be 93 years old there was no way we could focus on every aspect of her life. Once we decided to make a 12-year jump from her triumph at Bellas Artes in Mexico to her being confined to a wheelchair, it made the entire process easier. In hindsight I think it was a wise choice because by that time we had firmly established how solitary and fiercely independent she was which made the impact of her forced immobility even stronger for our viewers.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

CG: I wish there were a more promising answer, a more sustainable road towards making docs that matter, but as usual, we ground out the foundation with grant applications. We received grants from, among others, the Nea, Women and Film, and Frameline.

We also were blessed with angels early on, executive producers Lynda Weinman and Bruce Heavin. Their seed investment was pivotal. We have co-producers and individual donors.

We opted not to do Kickstarter this time — although I did that for “Born to Fly” — because although it was excellent for community building, the funding-to-time ratio was out of balance.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Dk: The best feedback we received came from our composer, Gil Talmi, who saw an early rough cut and said that he was moved by the way we presented the light and dark aspects of Chavela’s persona and story without judgment. Those words solidified something we’d be striving to do somewhat unconsciously and became a guiding principle.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

CG: Find a nugget that you don’t totally understand. Let the tiny fascination grow with your work and your collaborations. Discover something new so that you can share the power of revelation with your viewers. If it doesn’t interest you, it won’t interest anyone else either. Stick with it.

Find mentors. Work with people who’ve done the work before and never stop yourself from imagining bigger than they do. Without the confines of convention and tradition and reality, your vision will be creative and persistent and beautiful.

If you find any old footage pre-2000, anything shot before we all carried video cameras in our pockets, see what you can do with it — where you can take it, and where it can take you. Cinema is not a very old art form in the scheme of things and there is so much left to be made of it, in form and structure, but also in terms of content and understanding the power of the image and the power of representation.

Dk: Trust your instincts and surround yourself with people with similar aesthetic sensibilities who understand and support your vision. Also, hire as many women as possible! We have to support each other in this male-dominated industry.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

CG: My favorite woman-directed film is still Julie Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust,” because she invented a form. With that film, Julie generously released into the film world her creativity and vision. She moved us further away from enumeration of dominant facts or chronology and towards a magical dimension where we are all freer to participate, understand, communicate, and revel in our humanity.

Dk: I love different films for different reasons and find it almost impossible to narrow it down to just one! However, there are two films that stand out in my memory, Mira Nair’s “Kama Sutra,” which I loved for the depth of sensuality it captures and Kasi Lemmon’s “Eve’s Bayou,” whose mystical portrayal of a section of black life that is rarely seen I found very inspiring.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

CG: “Daughters of the Dust” was the very first film directed by an African American woman to be inducted into the National Film Registry — and that was not until 2003. Fewer than six percent of the films in the Registry are by women.

We need to stop worrying about playing by the rules and nurture women through every step of being able to tell our own stories. When women tell our stories, when we express our truths, the world will break open. We’re not there yet, but that doesn’t mean we should stop trying.

Dk: As Frederick Douglass said, “Power concedes nothing without a demand.” It is up to women to drive the change we need within the industry. As they climb the ladder of success, women in positions of power simply must bring other women along for the journey by mentoring and — even more importantly — employing them.

I am particularly inspired by women like Ava DuVernay, who seems hell-bent on creating as many opportunities for other women directors as possible. In the fight for equal representation and equal pay we must agitate, agitate, agitate!

https://medium.com/media/f09841c4cc83e7a08b71551e23447cf8/href

Catherine Gund and Daresha Kyi on Celebrating a “Badass Butch” in “Chavela” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Julie Taymor to Adapt Gloria Steinem’s Memoir

Steinem: Gage Skidmore

In what sounds like fan fiction dreamed up by feminist film lovers, word has come that Gloria Steinem’s memoir, “My Life on the Road,” is being adapted for the big screen. And Julie Taymor and Tony-nominated playwright Sarah Ruhl are taking it there. Deadline broke the news that the former will direct the feminist activist’s coming-of-age story and the latter will pen the screenplay.

The film, hailing from June Pictures, will chronicle “Steinem’s growth into a galvanizing symbol for equality, with a focus on the surprising encounters along the road that helped shaped her,” the source writes.

Taymor is perhaps best known for directing Broadway sensation “The Lion King.” Her screen credits include “Frida” and “Across the Universe.” “In the Next Room” and “The New World” are among Ruhl’s stage credits. This project marks her debut as a screenwriter.

In addition to directing, Taymor is also producing alongside Lynn Hendee (“Ender’s Game”) and June PicturesAndrew Duncan and Alex Saks. Steinem and Amy Richards (“Woman with Gloria Steinem”) are serving as executive producers.

“I can’t imagine anyone more magical than Julie Taymor — or more understanding than Lynn Hendee and Sarah Ruhl,” said Steinem. “So now that we are on this journey together, I hope and believe the result will encourage many more travelers — especially women in all our diverse realities — to tell our own stories.”

Taymor added, “When I read the book, it demanded that it be a film. It’s so vividly cinematic, with entertaining and complex characters and, like Gloria herself, also witty and provocative. From reluctant spokesperson to a beacon of positive change, hers is a singular journey — an American leader who can speak to us all.”

“My Life on the Road” was released in 2015. Steinem’s other books include “Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions,” “Revolution from Within: A Book of Self-Esteem,” and “Doing Sixty & Seventy.” Along with Jane Fonda and Robin Morgan, Steinem co-founded the Women’s Media Center, an organization that works towards making women more visible in media. She also co-founded Ms. magazine.

Last year Steinem debuted “Woman with Gloria Steinem.” The weekly Viceland docuseries is hosted by Steinem and highlights the work of a team of all-female journalists reporting stories about women and men who fight against gender-based violence. The first season concluded last June. No word yet on whether “Woman” will receive a second season.

Other upcoming female-led projects about pioneering activists to look forward to include Julie’s Dash’s biopic of civil rights leader Rosa Parks and Brie Larson-starrer “Victoria Woodhull,” a portrait of the first woman to run for president of the United States. Woodhull represented the Equal Rights Party.

Julie Taymor to Adapt Gloria Steinem’s Memoir was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

The Hitman’S Bodyguard on Blu-ray November 7th! Check Out the New Nsfw Trailer!

The Hilarious Action-Comedy Starring Ryan Reynolds and Samuel L. Jackson Arrives on Digital HD November 7 and 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray Combo Pack, and DVD November 21 from Lionsgate

Leading an all-star cast, Ryan Reynolds (Deadpool, The Proposal) and Samuel L. Jackson (Pulp Fiction, Marvel’s Cinematic Universe) take viewers on an outrageous action-packed, comedic adventure in The Hitman’s Bodyguard, arriving on Digital HD November 7 and 4K Blu-ray Combo Pack (plus Blu-ray and Digital HD), Blu-ray™ Combo Pack (plus DVD and Digital HD), DVD and On Demand November 21 from Lionsgate. When Michael Bryce, an elite bodyguard, and Darius Kincaid, a renowned hit man, are forced to work together, they don’t just have to avoid getting killed…they also have to avoid killing each other. The film, which was #1 at the summer box office three weeks in a row, also stars Oscar® nominees Gary Oldman (2011, Best Actor,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Julie Taymor To Direct Film On Gloria Steinem For June Pictures

  • Deadline
Julie Taymor To Direct Film On Gloria Steinem For June Pictures
Exclusive: June Pictures has set Julie Taymor to direct the coming-of-age story of iconic feminist, journalist and activist Gloria Steinem. Playwright Sarah Ruhl will write the script, based on Steinem’s bestselling memoir My Life on the Road. Taymor, who directed Frida, Across the Universe and Titus for the screen and The Lion King and Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark on Broadway, will helm a movie about Steinem’s growth into a galvanizing symbol for equality, with a focus…
See full article at Deadline »

Raindance Unveils Full Lineup, Including Closing Film ‘Stuck’ (Exclusive)

Raindance Unveils Full Lineup, Including Closing Film ‘Stuck’ (Exclusive)
The New York-set musical movie “Stuck” will have its international premiere at the Raindance Film Festival, which announced its full 2017 lineup Thursday. As the London-based festival’s closing film, “Stuck” follows a group of strangers who are stranded on a New York subway train together and who reveal their true selves through song and pop music. Directed by Michael Berry, it stars Giancarlo Esposito (“Okja”) and Oscar nominee Amy Madigan.

This year’s edition of Raindance features 200 films, shorts, Vr projects, and music videos, including Zachary Cotler and Magdalena Zyzak’s feature debut, “Maya Dardel,” starring Lena Olin and Rosanna Arquette; Tony Gatlif’s “Djam”; and Japanese film “Mukoku,” all of which are in competition. Other titles competing for awards include Jason Wingard’s directional debut, “In Another Life,” which is set against the backdrop of the “Jungle” refugee camp in Calais, France, and has its international premiere at Raindance.

Atsuko Hirayanagi
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Beatriz At Dinner Starring Salma Hayek and John Lithgow Available on Digital HD August 29th and DVD September 12th

Oscar nominees Salma Hayek (Frida, How to Be a Latin Lover) and John Lithgow (Terms of Endearment, “The Crown”) lead an all-star cast in Beatriz at Dinner, arriving on Digital HD on August 29 and on DVD and On Demand September 12 from Lionsgate. The provocative and sharply hilarious film about characters from vastly different sociopolitical backgrounds colliding over dinner is written by Mike White (School of Rock, TV’s “Enlightened”) and directed by Miguel Arteta (Youth in Revolt, The Good Girl), and also features Chloe Sevigny (TV’s “Big Love,” Boys Don’t Cry), Connie Britton (TV’s “Friday Night Lights,” “Nashville”), Amy Landecker (TV’s “Transparent,” Doctor Strange), and Jay Duplass (TV’s “Transparent,” “Togetherness”).

Salma Hayek shines in this provocatively funny fish-out-of-water comedy. Beatriz (Hayek), an immigrant from a poor Mexican town, draws upon her innate kindness as a spiritual health practitioner in L.A. Doug Strutt (Lithgow) is
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Wamg Giveaway – Win the How To Be A Latin Lover Blu-ray

The Hilarious Comedy How To Be A Latin Lover Starring Eugenio Derbez, Academy Award Nominee Salma Hayek, Raquel Welch, Rob Lowe and Kristen Bell, Arrives on Digital HD August 1 and Blu-ray Combo Pack & DVD August 15 from Lionsgate

Eugenio Derbez (Instructions Not Included) and Academy Award® nominee Salma Hayek (Best Actress, Frida, 2002) lead an all-star cast in How to Be a Latin Lover, arriving on Digital HD August 1 and Blu-ray™ (plus DVD and Digital HD), DVD and On DemandAugust 15 from Lionsgate. Theatrically released by Pantelion, How to Be a Latin Lover is a laugh-out-loud comedy about an aging “ladies’ man” who is thrust back into real life after years of being pampered, and onto the doorstep of his estranged sister and nephew. Directed by comedy veteran Ken Marino (“Childrens Hospital,” “Party Down”) and written by Jon Zack (The Perfect Score) & Chris Spain, the film features a standout ensemble cast,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Salma Hayek Reveals the Moment She Knew Donald Trump Would Be President

  • PEOPLE.com
Salma Hayek Reveals the Moment She Knew Donald Trump Would Be President
Salma Hayek has never been afraid of voicing her opinions or stories about Donald Trump. From calling the then-Republican presidential candidate out on Twitter for confusing 9/11 with 7-Eleven to sharing her story of turning him down for a date.

“When I met that man, I had a boyfriend, and he tried to become his friend to get my home telephone number. He got my number, and he would call me to invite me out,” Hayek told Radio Centro 93.9’s El Show del Mandril in Los Angeles, as reported by Buzzfeed.

Now, the actress is sharing her story on the moment
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

How To Be A Latin Lover Starring Eugenio Derbez and Salma Hayek Available on Digital HD August 1st and on Blu-ray August 15th

The Hilarious Comedy How To Be A Latin Lover Starring Eugenio Derbez, Academy Award Nominee Salma Hayek, Rob Lowe and Kristen Bell, Arrives on Digital HD August 1 and Blu-ray Combo Pack & DVD August 15 from Lionsgate

Eugenio Derbez (Instructions Not Included) and Academy Award® nominee Salma Hayek (Best Actress, Frida, 2002) lead an all-star cast in How to Be a Latin Lover, arriving on Digital HD August 1 and Blu-ray™ (plus DVD and Digital HD), DVD and On DemandAugust 15 from Lionsgate. Theatrically released by Pantelion, How to Be a Latin Lover is a laugh-out-loud comedy about an aging “ladies’ man” who is thrust back into real life after years of being pampered, and onto the doorstep of his estranged sister and nephew. Directed by comedy veteran Ken Marino (“Childrens Hospital,” “Party Down”) and written by Jon Zack (The Perfect Score) & Chris Spain, the film features a standout ensemble cast, including Rob Lowe
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Halle Berry Says Her Historic Oscar Win 'Meant Nothing' for Film Diversity

Halle Berry Says Her Historic Oscar Win 'Meant Nothing' for Film Diversity
While Halle Berry recognizes that she made history at the 2002 Oscars with her lead actress win for Monster's Ball, she said in a recent interview that she still thinks it wasn't enough.

"I was pretty sure Sissy Spacek was going to win [for In the Bedroom]," she told Teen Vogue's editor-in-chief Elaine Welteroth of going up against some of Hollywood biggest names that year. "That [sentiment] is just what was ruminating in my spirit during that whole process."

Still, the actress exuded positivity and hope when she gave her memorable and emotional acceptance speech that year,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

'Beatriz at Dinner' Review: Salma Hayek Serves Truthbombs at Dinner Party From Hell

'Beatriz at Dinner' Review: Salma Hayek Serves Truthbombs at Dinner Party From Hell
Salma Hayek gives the performance of her career in this stealth weapon of a comedy from director Miguel Arteta and screenwriter Mike White, one that takes aim at the divided and divisive world we live in. Don't say you haven't noticed. The star, bringing down the glam but radiating grit and grace, plays Beatriz, a Los Angeles massage therapist and holistic healer. Her life revolves around her patients and the animals, mostly dogs and goats, she lives with in Altadina and treats like her children. Beatriz is an earth mother,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Trailer Watch: Salma Hayek Takes on a Trump-Like Figure in “Beatriz at Dinner”

Beatriz at Dinner

If you find dinner parties awkward, prepare to cringe your way through a new trailer for Salma Hayek-starrer “Beatriz at Dinner.” Beatriz (Hayek) has way more to deal with than dinner companions droning on about their boring jobs or chewing with their mouths open. The party escalates into an all-out war.

“At an elegant dinner party in a swanky hilltop home, conversation between a soft-spoken holistic healer and a hard-nosed businessman explodes into a bitter clash of cultures,” the film’s synopsis details.

The spot shows how Beatriz wasn’t initially invited to the party. She came to practice on the host (Connie Britton, “Nashville”) before the festivities kicked off and car trouble prevented her from leaving.

At the dinner table, Beatriz begins a story: “When I first came to the United States a long time ago — .” She’s interrupted mid-sentence by the wildly obnoxious billionaire, Doug (John Lithgow), who asks, “Did you come legally?”

Doug values profit over people and the future of the environment. “The world is dying,” Beatriz says. Unfazed and unimpressed, a smirking Doug responds, “Elephants are dying, bees are dying.” Doug will undoubtedly earn comparisons to another privileged businessman who denies climate change and is suspicious of — and hostile towards — immigrants.

Hayek received an Oscar nomination in 2003 for her role in “Frida,” Julie Taymor’s Frida Kahlo biopic. “Septembers of Shiraz,” “30 Rock,” and “Once Upon a Time in Mexico” are among her other credits.

Beatriz at Dinner” made its world premiere at Sundance in January. The ensemble cast includes Chloë Sevigny (“Bloodline”) and Amy Landecker (“Transparent”). Directed by Miguel Arteta (“The Good Girl”), “Beatriz at Dinner” hits theaters June 9.

https://medium.com/media/be03c64d8105a187e74b22ebfe1aa1a3/href

Trailer Watch: Salma Hayek Takes on a Trump-Like Figure in “Beatriz at Dinner” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Cannes: HBO Latino Takes U.S. on Gael Garcia Bernal’s ‘You’re Killing Me, Susana’ (Exclusive)

Cannes: HBO Latino Takes U.S. on Gael Garcia Bernal’s  ‘You’re Killing Me, Susana’ (Exclusive)
Cannes — HBO Latino has acquired U.S. pay TV and Svod rights to “You’re Killing Me, Susana,” a romantic comedy-then-drama powered by a charismatic performance by Gael Garcia Bernal.

In further first deals, the latest movie from “Frida” producer and “Arrancame la vida” director Roberto Sneider, has closed Spain (Versus Ent.), Australia/New Zealand (Palace), Greece (Tanweer), and Taiwan (AVjet Intl. Media).

These will not be the last by Guido Rud’s FilmSharks Intl., which announced it has acquired “Susana” at Berlin: France, Germany, the U.K., Scandinavia, China, Korea and Cis are under negotiations; an Eastern Europe deal is imminent, Rud said.

Written by Sneider and Luis Camara, the purposely messy movie, as loud and rambunctious as the Mexican ethos it plumbs, “You’re Killing Me, Susana” tracks Eligio, a philandering two-bit Mexican actor who, when his wife (Veronica) unsurprisingly abandons him, pursues her to a writing workshop
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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