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16 items from 2017


Beatriz at Dinner to open Sundance London 2017

18 April 2017 4:37 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Sundance Institute and Picturehouse announced today that the 2017 Sundance Film Festival: London will open with the European premiere of Beatriz at Dinner [watch the trailer here].

Beatriz at Dinner reunites director Miguel Arteta and screenwriter Mike White (School of Rock, Nacho Libre), who worked together on earlier Sundance Film Festival hits The Good Girl and Chuck & Buck. The film stars Salma Hayek (Frida, Tale of Tales) as the eponymous ‘Beatriz’ alongside John Lithgow, Connie Britton, Chloë Sevigny and Jay Duplass. Director Miguel Arteta, screenwriter Mike White and Salma Hayek will be in attendance to introduce the film at Picturehouse Central on Thursday, June 1st.

“I’m thrilled that Beatriz At Dinner will open the Sundance Film Festival: London,” said Arteta. “Amidst the comedy, drama and brilliant performances in the film, Mike White’s script weaves some timely and potent political commentary and we’re especially excited to premiere the film to UK audiences at »

- Gary Collinson

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Trailer Watch: Salma Hayek Goes to the Dinner Party from Hell in “Beatriz at Dinner”

17 April 2017 1:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Beatriz at Dinner

A trailer has landed for Salma Hayek-starrer “Beatriz at Dinner,” and the spot is full of cringe-inducing moments. “This woman is a saint. It’s like birds fly out of the sky and land on her shoulder,” we’re told of Beatriz (Hayek), a spiritual health practitioner attending a dinner party. Seconds later, Beatriz is asked by a fellow guest, “Can I get another bourbon, hon?” Everyone else attending the party is white. “Oh, you were hovering. I just assumed you were part of the staff,” an unapologetic, boorish, Donald Trump-like real estate mogul named Doug Strutt (John Lithgow) says. And things only get worse from there.

At the dinner table, Beatriz begins a story: “When I first came to the United States a long time ago — .” She’s interrupted mid-sentence by the billionaire, who asks, “Did you come legally?” Rather than admonishing Doug for his inexcusable rudeness, the other guests try to change the subject by commenting on the meal.

“I think fate brought us together,” Beatriz tells Doug. But the smug businessman has no interest in what Beatriz has to offer. “The world doesn’t need your feelings,” he says. “It needs jobs. It needs money. It needs what I do.”

Hayek received an Oscar nomination in 2003 for her role in “Frida,” Julie Taymor’s Frida Kahlo biopic. “Septembers of Shiraz,” “30 Rock,” and “Once Upon a Time in Mexico” are among her other credits.

Beatriz at Dinner” made its world premiere at Sundance in January. The ensemble cast includes Connie Britton (“Nashville”), Chloë Sevigny (“Bloodline”), and Amy Landecker (“Transparent”). Directed by Miguel Arteta (“The Good Girl”), “Beatriz at Dinner” hits theaters June 9.

https://medium.com/media/a54651fd8e984db2bd401d9fa73d187f/href

Trailer Watch: Salma Hayek Goes to the Dinner Party from Hell in “Beatriz at Dinner” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 5: 2000–2017

24 March 2017 2:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Mira Nair and Ava DuVernay: Wikimedia Commons/IndiaFM/Bollywoodhungama/usbotschaftberlin

by Carrie Rickey

This five-part Truthdig series by Carrie Rickey is published in partnership with Women and Hollywood. The series considers the historic accomplishments of women behind the camera, how they got marginalized, and how they are fighting for equal employment. Specifically, this series asks, why do females make up between 33 and 50 percent of film-school graduates but account for only seven percent of working directors? What happened to the women directors in Hollywood?

Female filmmakers greeted the 21st century with optimism. By most measures, movies by women were garnering increased respect in the industry and at the multiplex. Their makers cracked glass ceilings, created new genres, and established new box-office records.

With “Nowhere in Africa” (2001), Caroline Link became the second woman to direct the Oscar-winner for the year’s best foreign film. With “Lost in Translation” (2003), Sofia Coppola was the third woman to receive a best director nomination from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. And with “The Hurt Locker” (2009), Kathryn Bigelow was the fourth woman nominated in the directing category — and the first to win. The following year, Danish filmmaker Susanna Bier directed the winner in the best foreign film category, “In a Better World.”

Gina Prince-Bythewood’s “Love & Basketball” (2000), Karyn Kusama’s “Girlfight” (2000) and Gurinder Chadha’s “Bend It Like Beckham” (2003) created what might be called the “Title IX” movie, celebrating female athletes on the court, in the ring, and on the field. These are sports movies that celebrate the female body — not for its sex appeal, but for its power. These films inspired younger women (and their mothers were thrilled to take them to movies that didn’t objectify women).

Comedies by women continued to make serious box office, proving the Hollywood wisdom that “funny is money.” Nancy Meyers’ “What Women Want” (2000), starring Mel Gibson as a player briefly given the power to hear what women think about him, made $374 million. Sharon Maguire’s “Bridget Jones’s Diary” (2001), in which the title character says what she thinks about womanizers and prigs, brought in $282 million. Movies like these permitted men and women to laugh at men’s foibles.

From Patricia Cardoso’s “Real Women Have Curves” (2002), which introduced America Ferrera as a college-bound Latina, to Julie Taymor’s biopic “Frida” (2003), with Salma Hayek as Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, to Patty Jenkins’ “Monster” (2003), with Charlize Theron as serial killer Aileen Wuornos, audiences saw realistic women — as opposed to human swizzle sticks with breasts — in movies by women.

Many critics hailed Niki Caro’s “Whale Rider” (2003), about a Maori preteen who challenges her tribal patriarchy and becomes the new chief, as a harbinger of the triumph of female filmmakers over the status quo. Others pointed to the fact that for the first time since records had been kept, in 2000 women made 11 percent of the top 250 box office films. For women who make movies, the new century felt like a new day.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Sadly, that encouraging percentage turned out to be a fluke. After 2000, the number dwindled. It remains stuck in the 6 to 9 percent range, says Martha Lauzen, professor of communications and head of the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University. Since 1998 Lauzen has tracked women working in the industry in her annual “Celluloid Ceiling” report.

“When I started this, I thought it was merely an issue of people not knowing how low the numbers were,” Lauzen said ruefully. “I didn’t know how slow social change is.”

Lauzen’s reporting represents one of three vital resources for understanding the triumphs female filmmakers have made and how far they need to go to achieve parity with men. The others are Stacy Smith’s Media Diversity and Social Change Institute at USC’s Annenberg School and The Bunche Center at UCLA.

Collectively and individually, these creators of annual good news/bad news reports have kept the issue of representation in the public eye.

The Good: For Kathryn Bigelow (“The Hurt Locker,” “Zero Dark Thirty”), the late Nora Ephron (“Julie & Julia”), and Nancy Meyers (“It’s Complicated,” “The Intern”), the 21st century has been a fruitful time. So, too, for younger female moviemakers. Consider Lisa Cholodenko (“Laurel Canyon,” “The Kids Are All Right”), Ava DuVernay (“Selma,” “13th”), and Mira Nair (“Monsoon Wedding,” “The Namesake”).

Consider also that Catherine Hardwicke established a franchise with “Twilight” (which made $393 million), Sam Taylor-Johnson created another with “50 Shades of Grey” ($571 million), and that Anne Fletcher’s “The Proposal” made $317 million and Phyllida Lloyd’s “Mamma Mia!” earned $609 million.

Additionally, filmmakers like Dee Rees (“Pariah”), Debra Granik (“Winter’s Bone”), and Lone Scherfig (“An Education”) broke into the market with unique visions and eyes for new talent, including Adepero Oduye, Jennifer Lawrence, and Carey Mulligan. Significantly, Vicky Jenson (“Shrek”), Jennifer Lee (“Frozen”), Jennifer Yuh Nelson (“Kung Fu Panda 2”), and Brenda Chapman (“Brave”) staked a place for women in animation.

The Bad: For every woman appearing onscreen in movies in 2015 there were 2.3 men, according to Stacy Smith’s Media Diversity & Social Change Initiative.

The Ugly: When Walt Hickey, culture reporter for the website fivethirtyeight.com, goes to the movies and sees the screen population is 69 percent male, it just looks wrong to him. “It’s like something apocalyptic has happened, like a parallel universe — a man’s world,” he says.

Both Lauzen’s and Smith’s data show that when a woman is behind the camera and/or screenplay, 39 percent of protagonists are female. In movies by male directors, only four percent of the lead characters are female.

A century ago, male dominance behind the camera and on the screen was not the norm. For women behind the camera, it’s been the norm since 1920. And for women onscreen, it’s been the norm since 1950. Because of this, moviegoers have a distorted picture of America as predominantly male and predominantly Caucasian, when it is neither. (For finer-grain data on minority representation, see this annual report from UCLA’s Bunche Center.)

The Force Reawakens

The Hollywood Dream Factory tailors the majority of its product to the measurements of the men in the audience. This troubles those who want their daughters to partake of the same professional opportunities, cultural representation, and dream lives as their sons. While “Nine to Five,” “Norma Rae,” and “Erin Brockovich” show that studios love stories of women who triumph over the odds, there is less obvious love for female filmmakers trying to beat the odds stacked against them in their professional lives.

Since the Original Six filed suit against two studios in 1983 (see Part 3), female filmmakers have met, strategized, and troubleshot. So much so that in one of her final essays before her death in 2012, Nora Ephron made a list of “Things I Won’t Miss.” Near the top: “Panels on Women in Film.” Many women in film felt as though they were running in place.

“Instead of holding a million panels about it,” Christine Vachon, producer of “Boys Don’t Cry” and “Carol,” exclaimed at the 2016 Sundance Festival, “let’s do something about it!”

Someone had. She is Maria Giese, director of the feature films “When Saturday Comes” and “Hunger.” In February 2013 she brought a complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Eeoc) in Los Angeles. Her contention was that the cohort of working filmmakers in the Directors Guild of America (DGA), of which she is a member, was overwhelmingly male.

(While the number of women in the guild directing episodic television amounts to 17 percent, the DGA 2015 census of female filmmakers registered 6.4 percent. That’s lower than the nine percent of female coal miners, and fractional next to the 32 percent of practicing physicians and 36 percent of practicing lawyers who are women).

The Eeoc, which collects data on employer/employee relations for each calendar year, was reluctant to take on a class-action suit.

In April 2013, Giese contacted the Aclu of Southern California and showed the evidence to Melissa Goodman, director of its Lgbtq, Gender & Reproductive Justice Project. For the next two years Goodman and her colleague Ariela Migdal took testimony from more than 50 female directors. In May 2015 they sent the Eeoc an extraordinary letter that counted the ways in which “female filmmakers are effectively excluded from directing big-budget films and seriously underrepresented in television.” A compelling argument in their letter: “The entertainment industry employs many people and makes products that profoundly shape our culture and the perception of women and girls.” Later in 2015, the Eeoc commenced its own investigation.

In January 2017, based on a high-level internal DGA leak received by Giese, Deadline Hollywood reported that after a federal investigation spanning a year that included testimony from over 100 women directors, the Eeoc recently served charges of sex discrimination and unfair hiring practice against all six major studios. While the federal agency does not comment on active cases, Gillian Thomas and Melissa Goodman of the Aclu wrote in an editorial that they had no reason to doubt the veracity of the leak.

A key factor contributing to Giese’s success in getting this issue to the Aclu and Eeoc was her ability to expose the structural obstacles female filmmakers face, from a guild that puts female and minority filmmakers in the same category, to the studios that question the fitness of women to direct.

Myths and Continued Underrepresentation

Over the 25 years I’ve reported on female filmmakers, I’ve interviewed two generations of movie executives. Most, but not all, were male. Most took seriously my questions about the apparent exclusion of women behind the camera, both on the screen and their forthcoming line-up.

Without exception, all of them retold one or more of the “Three Hollywood Myths.”

Myth #1) “Women don’t want to direct action movies and those are the films which are making money.”

Untrue. See: Martha Coolidge’s “Real Genius” (1985), Kathryn Bigelow’s “Point Break” (1991), Mimi Leder’s “The Peacemaker” (1997) and “Deep Impact” (1998), Lexi Alexander’s “Punisher: War Zone” (2008), and Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker” (2009) and “Zero Dark Thirty” (2012).

What is true is that Patty Jenkins was hired to direct “Thor: The Dark World” (2013) and left due to creative differences. She is now working on the forthcoming “Wonder Woman.”

What is true is that Mira Nair was offered a “Harry Potter” film and chose instead to make the family drama “The Namesake” because the material was more important to her, and that Ava DuVernay was offered “Black Panther,” the film version of the Marvel Comics series, and declined for similar reasons.

Myth #2) “Movies by women don’t make money.”

Untrue again. Some movies by women don’t make back their investment, just as some movies by men do not. What is true is that many movies by women make major bank. Catherine Hardwicke’s little $37 million film “Twilight” grossed $393 million and launched a billion-dollar franchise.

Hardwicke told me by phone that she hears all the time from studios that films by women are poor investments. “And every time you say, ‘Well, this one made money, that one made money,’ they say, ‘This one made money because it was based on a best-selling book,’ or ‘That one made money because of its hot actress.’”

Here are six more films by women and their box-office grosses. They made money because they powerfully connected with audiences.

Bend it Like Beckham” (Gurinder Chadha). Cost: $6 million/Gross: $77 million“Frida” (Julie Taymor). Cost: $12 million/Gross: $56 million“Frozen” (Jennifer Lee). Cost: $150 million/Gross: $1.2 billion“The Proposal” (Anne Fletcher). Cost: $40 million/Gross: $317 million“Selma” (Ava DuVernay). Cost: $20 million/Gross $67 million“Lost in Translation” (Sofia Coppola). Cost: $4 million/Gross $120 million

Myth #3) “A woman behind the camera means women on the screen and no men in the audience.”

Untrue, if taken literally. Sometimes movies by women have a lower percentage of men in the audience, just as sometimes movies by men have a lower percentage of women in the audience. Take, for example, the 2015 films, “Bridge of Spies” by Steven Spielberg and “The Intern” by Nancy Meyers.

According to Paul Dergarabedian of comScore, the research company’s “PostTrak” data shows the audience gender breakdown at “Bridge of Spies,” a ’60s-era political thriller starring Tom Hanks, was 54 percent male and 46 percent female. For “The Intern,” a contemporary workplace comedy co-starring Anne Hathaway and Robert De Niro, it was 41 percent male and 59 percent female. Spielberg’s film grossed $165 million; Meyers’ $194 million. His budget was $40 million; hers was $35 million.

Ava DuVernay’s “Selma,” the story of the 1965 march for voting rights led by Martin Luther King and starring David Oyelowo, had an audience gender breakdown of 47 percent male and 53 percent female. The assumption that movies come gendered with a blue or pink ribbon is a canard that still lingers in Hollywood, perhaps a vestige of the target marketing that began in the 1980s.

Speaking from the set of “Queen Sugar” in 2016, DuVernay observed, “We’re in a place right now where every other film is about a comic book superhero. We’re top-heavy with testosterone.”

How did Hollywood, a century ago a place where female directors thrived and prospered, come to this?

Stacy Title, director of “The Last Supper” and “The Bye Bye Man,” points the finger at “unconscious bias.”

Mira Nair, who was born in India, suspects chauvinism. “I’ve always remarked at the irony that the percentage of female directors is higher in India than in the United States,” she explained in a phone conversation. “India is supposed to be the traditional chauvinist culture,” she observes. Nair wonders if the historic examples of female prime ministers in South Asia — Indira Gandhi in India, Benazir Bhutto in Pakistan — may have broken the glass ceiling for all professional women there. “Their examples don’t exist in the U.S.”

DuVernay looks forward to the outcome — and hoped-for positive resolution — of the Eeoc investigation. “It’s a systematic problem and it requires radical change,” she said. “If it’s not happening organically, systems should be put in place.” Like many female filmmakers, DuVernay hopes the Eeoc can reconfigure what Giese calls the “vertical playing field for women” into a level one.

“One thing I’m heartened by,” said Nair, who’s been making features for nearly 30 years, “is that the variety and confidence of female filmmakers today is inspiring.”

Do others think it’s changed for the better for women since the 1980s?

“For me, there’s no comparison between the ’80s and now,” reflected Nancy Meyers, whose six films as a director or writer/director have grossed more than a billion dollars. By email she wrote:

Men were still getting used to us being on set in the ’80s. (Men used to have photos of pinups on the set in the ’80s! I’m not kidding.)The only women around back then worked in costumes and hair and makeup. Today women are in every department and often department heads. There are still very few women in the camera department and that’s a shame. That seems to still be a real boy’s club. Today, most crew members are far more comfortable working for and with women.

Yet one thing has not changed: “Now, getting the job to be the director — that’s still an uphill battle,” Meyers said.

In addition to writing film reviews and essays for Truthdig, Carrie Rickey has been a film critic at The Philadelphia Inquirer and Village Voice, and an art critic at Artforum and Art in America. Rickey has taught at various institutions, including School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, and has appeared frequently on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation,” MSNBC, and CNN.

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 5: 2000–2017 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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‘Silence’ Cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto to Make Directorial Debut

23 March 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto, who was nominated for an Oscar for shooting Martin Scorsese’s “Silence,” will make his directorial debut with the revenge-thriller “Bastard.”

La La Land’s” Jordan Horowitz is producing through his Original Headquarters company. Scorsese and Emma Tillinger Koskoff of Sikelia Prods. are executive producing. Topic, First Look Media’s entertainment studio, is financing.

Prieto will direct from an original script penned by Bill Gullo. Production is planned to start in the first quarter of 2018. Adam Pincus and Annie Marter will oversee for Topic.

“Bastard” is set against a looming flood that will ravage the small town of Bird’s Point, Mo.

“It’s an honor to get to make this picture alongside my terrific partners at Topic and First Look Media,” Horowitz said. “Rodrigo’s work as a cinematographer has consistently floored me, and putting him behind the camera to direct Bill’s absorbing script has »

- Dave McNary

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Salma Hayek to Be Honored with CinemaCon Vanguard Award

20 March 2017 2:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Salma Hayek in “Bystander Revolution

Salma Hayek has been named as the recipient of CinemaCon’s 2017 Vanguard Award. The Oscar-nominated actress will receive the honor March 30 at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace, ScreenDaily reports.

Lionsgate is screening “The Hitman’s Bodyguard,” an action comedy starring Hayek, during the convention.

“A commanding presence onscreen and off, Hayek has proven herself to be one of the most prolific actresses of our time,” CinemaCon managing director Mitch Neuhauser said. “From her stunning turn as Frida in the film of the same name, to her hilarious roles in films such as ‘Grown-Ups,’ Hayek has not only entertained audiences around the world with her vast array of roles but she has devoted herself to causes with a passion unlike no other.”

Back in 2015, Hayek said, “I am Mexican. I am a woman. I am 48. I am at the bottom in Hollywood but I am working more than ever. I have never been embraced by the studio — I was always outside the system.” She emphasized, “Women don’t have enough voice and we can’t express who we are. We need to see ourselves [represented].”

Her recent credits include “Sausage Party,” “Septembers of Shiraz,” and “Tale of Tales.” Hayek received a Best Actress Oscar nomination in 2003 for “Frida.” She also produced the biopic of artist Frida Kahlo.

CinemaCon will take place in Las Vegas from March 27–30. Jessica Chastain is being recognized as Female Star of the Year at the industry convention.

Salma Hayek to Be Honored with CinemaCon Vanguard Award was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Awards Roundup: CinemaCon to Honor Goldie Hawn, John Cena, Ansel Elgort and More

17 March 2017 7:15 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Keep up with the glitzy awards world with our weekly Awards Roundup column.

– Academy Award winner Goldie Hawn will receive the prestigious “Cinema Icon Award” at CinemaCon, the official convention of The National Association of Theatre Owners (Nato) held March 27 – 30 at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

Hawn will be presented with this special honor at the “CinemaCon Big Screen Achievement Awards” ceremony Thursday, March 30 hosted by the Coca-Cola Company, the official presenting sponsor of CinemaCon. Previous winners of this esteemed award include Morgan Freeman, Susan Sarandon, Michelle Pfeiffer and Kevin Costner.  

“With a career that has spanned roles in more than 30 films Goldie Hawn continues to shine on the big screen as one of the most entertaining, relatable and recognizable actresses of our time,” noted Neuhauser. “With an unforgettable presence and charm both onscreen and off Hawn has entertained audiences of all ages and we are pleased to honor an »

- Kate Erbland

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Salma Hayek to receive CinemaCon Vanguard Award

15 March 2017 4:30 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Mexican actress stars in convention screening of The Hitman’s Bodyguard.

Salma Hayek will receive CinemaCon’s 2017 Vanguard Award on March 30 at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace.

Lionsgate will stage a screening during the show of its August 18 release The Hitman’s Bodyguard starring Hayek, whose upcoming roles include Pantelion Films’ April release How To Be A Latin Lover.

“A commanding presence onscreen and off Hayek has proven herself to be one of the most prolific actresses of our time,” CinemaCon managing director Mitch Neuhauser said.

“From her stunning turn as Frida in the film of the same name, to her hilarious roles in films such as Grown-Ups, Hayek has not only entertained audiences around the world with her vast array of roles but she has devoted herself to causes with a passion unlike no other.”

CinemaCon is scheduled to take place in Las Vegas from March 27-30. »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Selma Hayek to receive CinemaCon Vanguard Award

15 March 2017 4:30 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Mexican actress stars in convention screening of The Hitman’s Bodyguard.

Selma Hayek will receive CinemaCon’s 2017 Vanguard Award on March 30 at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace.

Lionsgate will stage a screening during the show of its August 18 release The Hitman’s Bodyguard starring Hayek, whose upcoming roles include Pantelion Films’ April release How To Be A Latin Lover.

“A commanding presence onscreen and off Hayek has proven herself to be one of the most prolific actresses of our time,” CinemaCon managing director Mitch Neuhauser said.

“From her stunning turn as Frida in the film of the same name, to her hilarious roles in films such as Grown-Ups, Hayek has not only entertained audiences around the world with her vast array of roles but she has devoted herself to causes with a passion unlike no other.”

CinemaCon is scheduled to take place in Las Vegas from March 27-30. »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Shirley MacLaine to be Honored by Texas Film Hall of Fame

1 February 2017 7:18 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Shirley MacLaine and Oscar-nominated producer Sarah Green have been added to the Texas Film Hall of Fame's 2017 list of honorees.

MacLaine will receive the lifetime achievement award and the "Star of Texas" award for her Oscar-winning role in Terms of Endearment.

Oscar-nominated producer Sarah Green — whose films include The Tree of Life, Knight of Cups, Frida, Girlfight, Midnight Special, Mud and Take Shelter — will be inducted into the Texas Film Hall of Fame. Green works closely with Austin-based writer-directors Jeff Nichols and Terrence Malick.

Austin Film Society artistic director Richard Linklater said of MacLaine, "Shirley MacLaine is »

- Hilary Lewis

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Shirley MacLaine and Producer Sarah Green to Be Honored at 2017 Texas Film Awards

1 February 2017 11:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Shirley MacLaine and producer Sarah Green will be among the honorees for the 2017 Texas Film Hall of Fame, with the duo set to be celebrated at the Austin Film Society’s Texas Film Awards in March.

MacLaine, winner of a 1983 acting Oscar for “Terms of Endearment,” will accept the Star of Texas Award for the Texas-set film. She will also receive the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Texas Film Hall of Fame. MacLaine’s long career encompasses classics like “The Apartment” and “Steel Magnolias,” and she was awarded the Life Achievement Award from the American Film Institute in 2012.

Related

Austin Film Society Bangs Drum for Lone Star Filmmakers

Academy Award-nominated producer Green has produced Texas-made films including Terrence Malick’s “Song to Song” and “The Tree of Life.” She also produced the films “Mud” and the Academy Award-winning “Frida.”

Founded in 1985 by Richard Linklater, Afs launched the Texas Film Awards »

- Dani Levy

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Berlin 2017: Full international jury announced

31 January 2017 3:52 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The full international jury for this year’s Berlin Film Festival has been announced.

It was previously announced that Paul Verhoeven would head up the jury this year, and now the organizers have released the rest of the jury to judge the films in-competition. They are producer Dora Bouchoucha Fourati (Tunisia), artist Olafur Eliasson (Iceland), actress  Maggie Gyllenhaal (USA), actress Julia Jentsch (Germany), actor and director Diego Luna (Mexico), and director and screenwriter Wang Quan’an (People’s Republic of China).

This year’s Berlinale, the Berlin Film Festical, kicks off in Germany on February 9th through to the 19th. Keep it Thn for full coverage.

Paul Verhoeven, Jury President, Director, Screenwriter (The Netherlands)

The Dutch director and screenwriter Paul Verhoeven began his directing career in 1969 with the successful Dutch television series Floris. After his feature film debut Business is Business in 1971, came the erotic thriller Turkish Delight in 1973, a »

- Paul Heath

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'Silence', 'Moonlight' in contention for Asc prize

11 January 2017 1:42 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The American Society Of Cinematographers (Asc) on Wednesday unveiled its nominees in the theatrical release and Spotlight categories for the 31st Annual Asc Awards For Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography.

Winners will be announced on February 4 at the Society’s awards gala in Hollywood.

Theatrical release nominees

Greig Fraser, Lion

James Laxton Moonlight

Rodrigo Prieto, Silence

Linus Sandgren, La La Land

Bradford Young, Arrival

Prieto has earned two Asc nominations prior to this for Frida and Brokeback Mountain. The remaining contenders are first-time nominees.

The Asc also recognises outstanding cinematography in feature that screened at festivals, internationally or in limited theatrical release.

Spotlight Award nominees

Lol Crawley, Childhood Of A Leader

Gorka Gomez Andreu, House Of Others

Ernesto Pardo, Tempestad

Juliette van Dormael, Mon Ange (My Angel)

“Each of the nominated films offers a unique vision on the part of the director of photography,” said Asc president Kees van Oostrum. “These movies also represent a less formulaic or traditional »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Cinematographers Guild Nominates Oscar Frontrunners ‘La La Land,’ ‘Moonlight’

11 January 2017 1:10 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The American Society of Cinematographers nominees for the 31st annual Asc Awards (February 4) boost Oscar frontrunners “La La Land” and “Moonlight” as well as Rodrigo Prieto’s 35 mm work on “Silence,” Greig Fraser’s “Lion” and “Arrival,” whose cinematographer Bradford Young would be the first African-American Oscar nominee.

Arrival,” “La La Land” and “Lion” also landed BAFTA nods.

Left out by the Asc but still vying for Oscar nominations are Charlotte Bruus Christensen (“Fences”), Roger Deakins (“Hail, Caesar!”), Stephane Fontaine (“Jackie”), Jody Lee Lipes (“Manchester By the Sea”), Seamus McGarvey (“Nocturnal Animals”), Giles Nuttgens (“Hell or High Water”) and Mandy Walker (“Hidden Figures”).

The Asc nominees below are all first-timers except for third-timer Prieto, who was also nominated “Frida” (2002) and “Brokeback Mountain” (2005). All other nominees this year are first-time contenders (see my Oscar predictions in this category):

Greig Fraser, Asc, Acs for “Lion

James Laxton for “Moonlight

Rodrigo Prieto, »

- Anne Thompson

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Cinematographers Guild Nominates Oscar Frontrunners ‘La La Land,’ ‘Moonlight’

11 January 2017 1:10 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The American Society of Cinematographers nominees for the 31st annual Asc Awards (February 4) boost Oscar frontrunners “La La Land” and “Moonlight” as well as Rodrigo Prieto’s 35 mm work on “Silence,” Greig Fraser’s “Lion” and “Arrival,” whose cinematographer Bradford Young would be the first African-American Oscar nominee.

Arrival,” “La La Land” and “Lion” also landed BAFTA nods.

Left out by the Asc but still vying for Oscar nominations are Charlotte Bruus Christensen (“Fences”), Roger Deakins (“Hail, Caesar!”), Stephane Fontaine (“Jackie”), Jody Lee Lipes (“Manchester By the Sea”), Seamus McGarvey (“Nocturnal Animals”), Giles Nuttgens (“Hell or High Water”) and Mandy Walker (“Hidden Figures”).

The Asc nominees below are all first-timers except for third-timer Prieto, who was also nominated “Frida” (2002) and “Brokeback Mountain” (2005). All other nominees this year are first-time contenders (see my Oscar predictions in this category):

Greig Fraser, Asc, Acs for “Lion

James Laxton for “Moonlight

Rodrigo Prieto, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Arrival,’ ‘La La Land,’ ‘Lion,’ ‘Moonlight’ and ‘Silence’ Score ASC Nominations

11 January 2017 12:37 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The American Society of Cinematographers has announced nominees for the 31st annual Asc Awards, adding momentum to Oscar season frontrunners “La La Land” and “Moonlight.”

Also nominated were “Lion” (last year’s Golden Frog winner at the Camerimage cinematography festival), “Arrival” and, in its first guild/industry group citation so far, “Silence.”

The nominees are:

Greig Fraser, Asc, Acs for “Lion

James Laxton for “Moonlight

Rodrigo Prieto, Asc, AMC for “Silence

Linus Sandgren, Fsf for “La La Land

Bradford Young, Asc for “Arrival

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This is Prieto’s third Asc nomination. He was previously recognized for “Frida” in 2002 and “Brokeback Mountain” in 2005. All other nominees this year are first-time contenders.

Arrival,” “La La Land” and “Lion” were also singled out by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts this week, along with “Hell or High Water” and “Nocturnal Animals.”

Other films in the hunt for Oscar recognition include “Hail, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Salma Hayek Does "GQ"

6 January 2017 9:40 AM, PST | SneakPeek | See recent SneakPeek news »

Sneak Peek new images of actress, producer, director Salma Hayek in the latest issue of "GQ" (Mexico) magazine, photographed by Nico Bustos:

Hayek began her career in Mexico starring in the telenovela "Teresa", followed by the film "El Callejón de los Milagros" ("Miracle Alley") for which she was nominated for an 'Ariel Award'.

In 1991 Hayek moved to California and came to prominence with roles in movies including "Desperado" (1995), "Dogma" (1999), and "Wild Wild West" (1999).

Hayek's breakthrough role was in the 2002 feature "Frida" as Mexican painter 'Frida Kahlo' for which she was nominated in the category of 'Best Actress' for an 'Academy Award', 'BAFTA Award', 'Screen Actors Guild Award' and 'Golden Globe Award'.

Hayek also won a 'Daytime Emmy Award' for 'Outstanding Directing' in a Children, Youth, Family Special (2004) for "The Maldonado Miracle" and received an 'Emmy Award' nomination for 'Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series' in 2007 after guest-starring in »

- Michael Stevens

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