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Replacing Kevin Spacey on ‘All the Money in the World’ Will Cost Millions

Replacing Kevin Spacey on ‘All the Money in the World’ Will Cost Millions
Ridley Scott’s decision to fire embattled actor Kevin Spacey and replace him with Christopher Plummer comes at a financial risk and carries a significant price tag, as the director races to finish the “All the Money in the World” ahead of its planned Dec. 22 release date.

It’s an unprecedented move, one that’s full of logistical challenges, as well as added, unexpected costs for reshoots, post-production, and the creation of new marketing materials. Some marketers estimate that the creation of new trailers, posters, in-theater standees, and additional advertising campaigns could total millions once rush fees and take-down costs are added up.

Despite the headaches and hit to the wallet, it’s a step that Scott and the film’s financiers Imperative Entertainment deemed necessary in the wake of several sexual assault and harassment allegations against Spacey, who plays billionaire J. Paul Getty in the picture. They felt that continuing on the project with Spacey’s name
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Work & Play: A Short Film about The Shining’ Peeks Behind the Curtain of Stanley Kubrick’s Horror Masterpiece

  • Indiewire
‘Work & Play: A Short Film about The Shining’ Peeks Behind the Curtain of Stanley Kubrick’s Horror Masterpiece
The Shining” is hitting the big screen for Halloween, and to celebrate Park Circus is releasing a short film, “Work & Play: A Short Film about The Shining,” which goes behind-the-scenes of Stanley Kubrick’s horror masterpiece.

For one night only, on October 31, over 100 cinemas throughout the United Kingdom, as well as select European and Latin American countries, will screen the 1980 Stephen King adaptation in several theaters. Before the film, the seven-minute short “Work & Play,” directed by Matt Wells, will give audiences fresh insight into the work that went into bringing the King novel to the big screen.

Read More: Stanley Kubrick Behind the Scenes: Here’s the Director on Set, From ‘Dr. Strangelove’ to ‘Eyes Wide Shut

“Work & Play” pairs behind-the-scenes photos of “The Shining” with interviews from the cast and crew, including Lisa and Louise Burns, the twin sisters from the film’s infamous hallway scene, Stanley Kubrick’s daughter,
See full article at Indiewire »

New Documentary about Kubrick’s “Eyes Wide Shut” in the Works

Award winning documentary film maker Tony Zierra recently unveiled his latest documentary “Filmmaker” at the Cannes and Lumíère international film festivals. The documentary about Leon Vitali, assistant to legendary director Stanley Kubrick, to critical acclaim. The film was actually not what Zierra intended to make when he set out to film a documentary about Stanley Kubrick’s last film “Eyes Wide Shut”, but he felt the story of Vitali was fascinating and needed to be told. Zierra is currently working on the documentary that he originally set out to make. The documentary about Stanley Kubrick’s “Eyes Wide Shut” will be called

New Documentary about Kubrick’s “Eyes Wide Shut” in the Works
See full article at TVovermind.com »

‘Eyes Wide Shut’ Documentary Will Examine Stanley Kubrick’s Final Film

  • Slash Film
‘Eyes Wide Shut’ Documentary Will Examine Stanley Kubrick’s Final Film
Stanley Kubrick, one of the most acclaimed filmmakers in the history of the medium, left this world in 1999, but right before his death he completed work on his final film, Eyes Wide Shut. The psychological journey into a night of Christmastime orgies and sexual frustration divided critics and audiences alike upon release, but in subsequent […]

The post ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ Documentary Will Examine Stanley Kubrick’s Final Film appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Nicole Kidman’s Best Performances — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
Nicole Kidman’s Best Performances — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Killing of a Sacred Deer,” what is Nicole Kidman’s greatest performance?

Vadim Rizov (@VRizov), Filmmaker Magazine

I don’t know about “best” — I haven’t seen an embarrassing chunk of what are considered her most significant roles, and I’m weak on understanding acting — but the performance that sticks most in my mind (quite possibly because I saw it at impressionable high school age) is “Dogville.” Kidman is spookily withdrawn, like an observer alien in a human body dropped into a moral wasteland which she attempts to navigate with understanding and decorum until finally it’s just too much. As in “Birth,
See full article at Indiewire »

Documentary About Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ In The Works

  • The Playlist
While I wouldn’t quite call “Eyes Wide Shut” divisive, Stanley Kubrick‘s final film is either seen as his final masterpiece or a picture where he didn’t quite hit it out of the park. A Christmas movie about breaking up, a dream-like erotic fable about the illusion of monogamy, just like with this other films, “Eyes Wide Shut” offers a lot to unpack. Now, a documentary is going to attempt to do just that.

Continue reading Documentary About Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ In The Works at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Eyes Wide Shut’ Documentary ‘SK13’ in the Works From ‘Filmworker’ Director Tony Zierra

  • Indiewire
‘Eyes Wide Shut’ Documentary ‘SK13’ in the Works From ‘Filmworker’ Director Tony Zierra
Tony Zierra isn’t done with Stanley Kubrick yet. After directing “Filmworker,” a documentary about the meticulous auteur’s right-hand man, Zierra is set to make a movie about “Eyes Wide Shut.” In an interview with Variety, he reveals that “SK13” — shorthand for Stanley Kubrick’s 13th film — was originally meant to precede “Filmworker.”

Read More:‘Filmworker’ Review: Stanley Kubrick’s Right-Hand Man Gets His Due in Tony Zierra’s Workmanlike Documentary

“The one movie that I feel is the wrinkle in Kubrick’s filmography is ‘Eyes Wide Shut.’ The people that love him always say, ‘He’s a genius, but I’m not sure what the hell that movie was about,’” says Zierra. It makes no sense to them. The casting doesn’t make any sense to them. The story doesn’t make any sense to them.” Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman star in the film, an erotic drama about a married couple.
See full article at Indiewire »

Tony Zierra to Follow up ‘Filmworker’ with New Stanley Kubrick Doc about ‘Eyes Wide Shut’

Tony Zierra to Follow up ‘Filmworker’ with New Stanley Kubrick Doc about ‘Eyes Wide Shut’
Lyon — Tony Zierra, the director of this year’s critically acclaimed Cannes screener “Filmworker” – about Leon Vitali, who served for decades as Stanley Kubrick’s right-hand man – is working on a followup Kubrick documentary about the making of the 1999 drama “Eyes Wide Shut,” starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman.

Zierra was in Lyon this week for a screening of “Filmworker” at the Lumière Film Festival, where the documentary has generated massive buzz.

Speaking to Variety about his next project, “SK13,” (“Eyes Wide Shut” being Kubrick’s 13th film), Zierra explained that he was originally working on that documentary when he met Vitali and decided to put it aside and do “Filmworker” first.

Zierra is now returning to his initial project, which promises an inside look at what is arguably Kubrick’s most controversial work, due in part to the director’s death during post-production.

“The one movie that I feel is the wrinkle in Kubrick’s filmography
See full article at Variety - Film News »

William Friedkin on the Power of Film, Capital Punishment and his Recklessness on ‘The French Connection’

William Friedkin on the Power of Film, Capital Punishment and his Recklessness on ‘The French Connection’
Lyon — Director William Friedkin, maker of “The French Connection” and “The Exorcist,” in Lyon for a showcase of his work, proved his storytelling prowess at a master class on Thursday as he captivated the audience with anecdotes of his illustrious career.

Particularly moving was the account of his first work, the 1962 documentary “The People vs. Paul Crump.”

After meeting the chaplain of the Cook County jail and learning about a young black man on death row named Paul Crump that both the pastor and the warden believed to be innocent, Friedkin visited the inmate and likewise became convinced of his innocence. He set out to make a documentary about the case in the hope of saving his life.

“A confession was beaten out of him by the Chicago police, which was done routinely in those days. If there was an African American accused of a crime they would go into the African American community and round up the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Pain Pays the Income of Each Precious Thing: Stanley Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon"

  • MUBI
“For an intellectual product of any value to exert an immediate influence which shall also be deep and lasting, it must rest on an inner harmony, yes, an affinity, between the personal destiny of its author and that of his contemporaries in general.”—Thomas Mann, Death in Venice Barry Lyndon. I can’t believe there was a time when I didn’t know that name. Barry Lyndon means an artwork both grand and glum. Sadness inconsolable. A cello bends out a lurid sound, staining the air before a piano droopingly follows in the third movement of Vivaldi's “Cello Concerto in E Minor.” This piece, which dominates the second half of the film, steers the hallowed half of my head to bask in the film’s high melancholic temperature. Why should I so often remember it? What did I have to do with this film? I only received it with
See full article at MUBI »

16 Years Later, We Still Don't Know Why Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise Divorced

  • Popsugar
16 Years Later, We Still Don't Know Why Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise Divorced
Before Nicole Kidman found love with husband Keith Urban, the actress spent the entire '90s married to Tom Cruise. The couple first met in 1989 during Nicole's audition for Days of Thunder, and they married shortly after on Dec. 24, 1990. During their relationship, Nicole and Tom starred together in films like Far and Away and Eyes Wide Shut, made several glamorous appearances together, and adopted two children, Connor and Isabella. In February 2001, however, Tom abruptly filed for divorce, citing "irreconcilable differences" and requesting joint custody of their kids. The reason for their split is still a little hazy, although there have long been rumors that Tom's faith as a Scientologist played a part. The two also rarely spoke about what went wrong in the years following their split, but they (mostly Nicole) have revealed small details about their marriage in recent years. Here's everything Tom and Nicole have said about their marriage since their split.
See full article at Popsugar »

Nyff Review: ‘Filmworker’ Fails to Probe the Man Behind Stanley Kubrick

Even well before his death in 1999, the life and work of Stanley Kubrick has been meticulously documented and expounded upon to such an extent that a cult of personality has inevitably developed around his universally acclaimed films and his notoriously fastidious, perfectionist tendencies as a filmmaker. But a bonafide auteur is not without his key collaborators. Although he did periodically work with the same crew members — e.g. cinematographer John Alcott and editor Ray Lovejoy — there is only one associate who remained a constant fixture of his late-career output.

Englishman Leon Vitali initially started as a minor, albeit prolific player in theater and television, particularly prestige costume dramas for the BBC during the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. Though Vitali occasionally starred in ultimately negligible films, it wasn’t until 1975 that he got his big break, securing an audition for Kubrick’s newest production, Barry Lyndon. He was handed a script with a single,
See full article at The Film Stage »

The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in October 2017

  • Indiewire
The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in October 2017
For movie lovers, October is the gloriously ghoulish time of year when we celebrate one kind of film above all others. That’s right: Biting comedies about dysfunctional New York Jews who finally decide to air their grievances after decades of resentment! Um… well, maybe Netflix didn’t get the memo. It’s not as though the streaming service isn’t scaring up some choice horror titles in time for Halloween (don’t miss “Raw” or “The Cult of Chucky”), but most of the month’s big new additions aren’t exactly in season.

Case in point: The splashiest arrival is a Noah Baumbach film, and it’s safe to say that “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” is considerably less frightening than any of the Adam Sandler comedies that Netflix has brought to you before. On the other hand, it’s true that movies can terrify you in a
See full article at Indiewire »

The myth of A Clockwork Orange’s ban

Simon Brew Oct 4, 2017

Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange was unavailable in the UK for nearly three decades. And yet it was never banned...

Throughout much of the 1980s and early 1990s, there were two films that many film nerds wanted to get their hands on, but in the UK at least, they couldn’t. For The Exorcist and A Clockwork Orange were arguably the two highest profile films that, for much of VHS’ popularity, you simply weren’t able to rent or buy on tape in the UK. As such, an under the counter industry in illegal, poor quality copies was booming, whilst many cinemas traded off late night shows of The Exorcist, where the film could still be seen freely.

See related Designated Survivor: a show well worth checking out

Yet not on VHS. Warner Bros. opted, in the midst and aftermath of the video nasty scandal in
See full article at Den of Geek »

Tom Cruise’s Best Performances — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
Tom Cruise’s Best Performances — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

Last weekend saw the release of the latest Tom Cruise vehicle, “American Made,” and critics are raving that it’s better than “The Mummy!” In honor of this great achievement, we ask: What is Tom Cruise’s greatest performance?

Read More:‘American Made’ Review: Tom Cruise Finally Lands a Role Worthy of His Talents E. Oliver Whitney (@cinemabite), ScreenCrush.com

The greatest Tom Cruise performance of all time happened on Oprah’s couch in 2005. But in the movies? “Magnolia.” It’s the best, but it’s also the “most” Cruise performance. His batshit insanity just barely holds together the fragile insecurity of the man beneath the horndog motivation speaker.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘American Made’ Review: Tom Cruise Grins His Way Through a Dark Comedy

  • Collider.com
As fun and as sharp as American Made can be, it’s also a bit depressing since you can’t help but feel like this was the opportunity for star Tom Cruise to return to the more nuanced performances he hasn’t shown us in over a decade. Cruise is a good actor, but it seemed like he made a decision in the late 2000s to only play likable characters, thus leaving behind more interesting roles like the ones he played in Magnolia, War of the Worlds, and Eyes Wide Shut. This renders Doug Liman’s movie a bit of …
See full article at Collider.com »

“American Made” puts Tom Cruise back into the world of biopics

Every decade or two, Tom Cruise seems to be compelled to take part in a biopic. Back in the late 80’s, it was his Academy Award nominated turn in Born on the Fourth of July. About 20 years later, it was Valkyrie. Now, this week sees him back playing a real person with American Made, a look at Barry Seal, a pilot who nearly ended up bringing down the Reagan Administration with his drug running. It’s still close to action hero territory at times for Cruise, but compared to many of his recent outings, this is downright a prestige picture. He’s a great movie star, endlessly compelling in action flicks, but serious films always contain his best performances. The movie is a biopic, albeit an unconventional one. Barry Seal (Cruise) is an unhappy Twa pilot who ends up recruited by the CIA during the 1980’s. Monty ‘Schafer’ (Domhnall Gleeson) sees something in Barry,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Pamela Adlon on Directing Every Episode of Season 2 of Her Remarkable FX Series ‘Better Things’

Pamela Adlon on Directing Every Episode of Season 2 of Her Remarkable FX Series ‘Better Things’
On the coffee table in Pamela Adlon’s sunny Sherman Oaks office, within easy reach of her comfortable, blanket-strewn couch, is a book of photographs by Vivian Maier.

Maier, who worked as a nanny in Chicago for years, took the art world by storm when her work came to light a few years ago. Unknown before her death (her negatives were discovered after she died in 2009), she was keenly interested in all kinds of humans, from homeless people and children to shoppers and socialites. Her uncontrived images grab the viewer in part because they don’t traffic in sentimentality or cliché.

The same can be said for Adlon, creator of FX’s “Better Things,” which returns Sept. 14. After a critically acclaimed first season, she has gone full auteur. Not only did she serve as showrunner and star once again (earning an Emmy nomination for best actress in a comedy), but she also directed every episode of the
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Killing Of A Sacred Deer Review [Tiff 2017]

This is a capsule review. A full one will be published closer to release.

If The Lobster didn’t mark the arrival of Yorgos Lanthimos as one of the unique masters of surrealist moviemaking, The Killing of a Sacred Deer surely confirms it. Here we have yet another film from the Greek director that takes an absurd premise, carries it to a certain kind of logical conclusion, and leaves his audience members’ faces sore from wincing at all the strangeness and anxiety they have experienced over the course of its 109 minutes.

Colin Farrell re-teams with his Lobster collaborator, picking up right where he left off in terms of the type of mannered performance this material calls for. It’s clear he’s bought into the tone of these movies, and it’s come to suit him perfectly. As the cardiac surgeon Steven, he possesses the perfect level of self awareness – that is to say,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The Forgotten: Stanley Donen's "Arabesque" (1966)

  • MUBI
In a sense, Arabesque (1966) is a sort of warmed-over rehash of Donen's earlier Charade (1963), which was a really nifty mock-Hitchcockian comedy thriller with Audrey Hepburn and Cary Grant. The later film stars Gregory Peck, who's no Grant, and Sophia Loren, who isn't Hepburn but is Loren—which ain't nothing.Donen was reputedly highly unhappy with the script, despite being the movie's producer, and his cinematographer Christopher Challis records him saying that their only hope was to present the story in as stylish and eccentric a manner as possible: this, for the most part, they do. (A pretty-well identical tale is told of Sidney J. Furie and The Ipcress File, and the result is similar in each case: a pop-art expressionist fairyland London in which everyone is or might be a spy or double or treble agent.)The opening scene, in which George Coulouris is murdered at the optician with poisoned eyedrops,
See full article at MUBI »
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