Enemy of the State
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1-20 of 100 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


10 Unforgettable Voices In A.I. Movie History

13 December 2012 10:00 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Look – computers will never have souls. It’s disappointing to admit, but we all have to face facts at some point in our lives. Maybe one day they’ll manage to act alive, but they will never feel our love. They have no feelings. They are soulless, uncaring devices that we all too often assign our own humanity to – just like cats. But of course, in film, that would just be no fun. It’s better to have an A.I. that is dynamic and has some kind of personality, even if that personality is a lack of any kind of personality. The key is the voice, and here are some of the most unforgettable ones… 10. Julianne Moore as Ariia – Eagle Eye Anyone see this film? It’s not bad in terms of an on-tv Sunday afternoon hangover film. You know the kind, like Bad Company or Enemy Of The State. Stuff »

- David Christopher Bell

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The 15 Biggest Movie News Stories of 2012

11 December 2012 9:00 AM, PST | NextMovie | See recent NextMovie news »

As another movie year comes to a close, it's time to look back at the biggest film-related stories of 2012 and take stock of all the highs and lows. And while there certainly were some major movie highs this year — from acclaimed period pieces to crowd-pleasing blockbusters to surprise comedy hits — frankly, we're more than happy for 2012 to be over.

That's because, as cool as the action was on screen, the headlines being made off-screen were often sad, disappointing or downright terrifying to think about. So let's look back at the year that was — and hope that 2013 is a whole hell of a lot more fun.

15. Johnny Depp Crashes and Burns

For the last decade or so, Johnny Depp has pretty much been the biggest star in the world. But in 2012, Depp's smooth sailing came to an abrupt end. First came the release of "Dark Shadows," which surprisingly bombed at the box office in May. »

- Scott Harris

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Tony Scott: A Moving Target—Movement B

3 December 2012 2:13 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 

Part of the Tony Scott: A Moving Target critical project. Go here for the project's description, index and links to project's other movement.

To the overabundance of text, sounds, images—and moving images—in Tony Scott, we reply with something like our own. So let me (try to) keep this (almost as) short as a Tony Scott shot. Scott’s death this past summer would elicit film critics’ own counterpart to American politics:  opinions and generalizations bandied between two camps who were, as always, preaching to their respective choirs. And needless to say, such discourses would be about as useful, informative, and interesting as American politics. For Scott’s work was hardly encamped: the outward liberalism of Enemy of the State, perhaps Hollywood’s most overt attack on our surveillance nation and the Nsa, possible only before 9/11, concludes that only Nsa aspirants can take down the Nsa, just as Man on Fire, »

- gina telaroli

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"Enemy of the State"

3 December 2012 6:11 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 

This article is part of the critical project Tony Scott: A Moving Target in which an analysis of a scene from a Tony Scott film is passed anonymously to the next participant in the project to respond to with an analysis of his or her own.

<- the previous analysis | movement index   | the next analysis ->

Righteous-subordination-as-genuine-patriotism is the theme of Scott's Enemy of the State, a theme that's transferred over from his earlier effort Crimson Tide. Between the two projects, there is also a noteworthy role reversal: Hackman exchanges the mantle of Captain Ramsey’s blindly nationalistic aggressor for that of the justifiably paranoid super-hacker, Brill. Brill has been targeted Public Enemy No. 1 due to his cyber-civil-disobedience against the proposed “Telecommunications Security and Privacy Act,” a kind of prescient, long way of saying The P.A.T.R.I.O.T. Act (which it turns out is actually a short way of saying: Uniting and Strengthening America »

- Ben Simington

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"Man on Fire"

3 December 2012 6:11 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 

This article is part of the critical project Tony Scott: A Moving Target in which an analysis of a scene from a Tony Scott film is passed anonymously to the next participant in the project to respond to with an analysis of his or her own.

<- the previous analysis | movement index   | the next analysis ->

When I started to get really interested in Tony Scott in the 90s, a friend of mine and I used to joke fondly about his signature text inserts of time and place (like “Occuquan Park, Maryland 0645 hrs.” over the very first image of Enemy of the State). Only after Scott fully entered his late, astonishing action painter phase starting with Man on Fire in 2004, did I realize we had instinctively hit on a key element of his work: Having studied art with the intention to become a painter before he ended up as a filmmaker, Scott had in some ways never completely abandoned »

- The Ferroni Brigade

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Standard Op

3 December 2012 6:11 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 

This article is part of the critical project Tony Scott: A Moving Target in which an analysis of a scene from a Tony Scott film is passed anonymously to the next participant in the project to respond to with an analysis of his or her own.

<- the previous analysis | movement index   | the next analysis ->

***

"If this government ever became a tyranny, if a dictator ever took charge in this country, the technological capacity that the intelligence community has given the government could enable it to impose total tyranny, and there would be no way to fight back, because the most careful effort to combine together in resistance to the government, no matter how privately it was done, is within the reach of the government to know. Such is the capability of this technology. I don't want to see this country ever go across the bridge. I know the capability that is there to make tyranny total in America, »

- David Phelps

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Tony Scott: A Moving Target—Movement A

27 November 2012 7:51 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 

Part of the Tony Scott: A Moving Target critical project. Go here for the project's description, index and links to project's other movement.

This is one "movement" of our exquisite corpse-style critical project, Tony Scott: A Moving Target, which coincidentally begins with a look at Crimson Tide, the same movie that begins the other movement. As outlined in the introduction to the entire project, this project began in my mind, as something fairly simple: a snaking continuum of scene analysis. This is only in part what resulted.

The varied responses I got back from my group—"mine" in the sense that it is the one I participated in, since Gina's contribution closes Movement B—seem to say as much about the participating critics as they do about Tony Scott's films and the overlap between the two: the perception of Scott's films and career. Thus many entries, including my own, »

- Daniel Kasman

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The Two Tonys

26 November 2012 8:14 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 

This article is part of the critical project Tony Scott: A Moving Target in which an analysis of a scene from a Tony Scott film is passed anonymously to the next participant in the project to respond to with an analysis of his or her own.

<- the previous analysis | movement index | the next analysis ->

In the vast majority of auteurist writing on Tony Scott, his hefty, multi-faceted body of work is split misleadingly into three phases: the early “art films” (One of the Missing, Living Memory, L’auteur de Beltraffio, The Hunger), the proficient, sometimes boneheaded spectacle films (Top Gun through to Enemy of the State), and the later, more abstract films (Spy Game onwards). Around about the time of Enemy of the State Scott’s work underwent a famed aesthetic transformation; taking the core ideas of all of his preceding blockbusters and blowing them up into dense, super-edited mutant hailstorms of sound and colour. Today, a »

- Christopher Small

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Tony Scott: A Moving Target

26 November 2012 2:40 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

For some time after Tony Scott tragically, mysteriously took his life earlier this year we tried to think of some way to honor his work and explore it on the Notebook. A proper response was found by filmmaker, editor and Notebook contributor Gina Telaroli, who suggested a kind of critical exquisite corpse, and in this manner forge a way—or an attempt—to fit the forms of Tony Scott's oeuvre to the content critics would contribute.

The project was simple in practice though a bit complicated in explanation: each participant would be restricted to a one week time limit in which he or she would pick a scene from a single Tony Scott film and write an analysis of it before passing that analysis anonymously to the next person in the project. The recipient would be tasked to "respond" to that analysis with a different scene from a different movie, »

- Daniel Kasman

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Three Dimensional Threat Space

26 November 2012 12:53 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 

This article is part of the critical project Tony Scott: A Moving Target in which an analysis of a scene from a Tony Scott film is passed anonymously to the next participant in the project to respond to with an analysis of his or her own.

movement index | the next analysis ->

In front of me is my laptop screen; beyond, outside the windows of the bus I'm traveling on, is the scrolling landscape. Already I'm approaching Tony Scott territory—I just need a crisis to precipitate outside that only my computer could explain. The wifi on the bus is down, however, so I cross my fingers nothing terrible out there will happen. But such an occurrence would be in a later Scott film, the Scott who preposterously, ingeniously included a wifi-connected laptop on a subway car stuck in the New York underground...and let a passenger secretly video »

- Daniel Kasman

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Men, Fire

26 November 2012 7:42 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 

This article is part of the critical project Tony Scott: A Moving Target in which an analysis of a scene from a Tony Scott film is passed anonymously to the next participant in the project to respond to with an analysis of his or her own.

<- the previous analysis | movement index | the next analysis ->

Enemy of the State: center(master)piece of Scott’s filmography, bridging the gap between two bifurcated halves of an oeuvre.

Scott has yet to depart the more conventional—still expressive—style of his earlier work, but technology begins to guide the narrative + aesthetics into the next stage of his cinema.

He anticipates the paranoia and national security anxiety that would heighten dramatically in post-9/11 America. Scott also anticipates his own post-9/11 cinema…

The opening credits, accompanied by Scott’s token stop/start musical score of orchestral rises and electro-rock crescendo bursts, a perfect distillation of late-Scott rapidity and abstraction.

Later: men, »

- Adam Cook

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Mubi Presents: "The Great Scott" in New York

19 November 2012 7:58 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

This December, Mubi will be presenting a small Tony Scott retrospective in New York at 92YTribeca. See below for the films, dates and notes. All movies will be shown on film.

***

American cinema lost one of its great, unsung, emigre directors when Tony Scott mysteriously took his life earlier this August. A pioneer in the commercial advertisement aesthetic of the 80s, Scott would take that aesthetic and build upon it, transferring it to a post-9/11 world with hyperfast cutting and camerawork that would eventually come to define the decade and the director. Gina Telaroli and I, working with 92YTribeca's Cristina Cacioppo, have assembled a program featuring one key film from each of Scott's three American periods. To draw out some of the best and overlooked qualities of his small but aesthetically and thematically coherent oeuvre, we're also accompanying each film with a short from the avant-garde, and completed the package »

- Daniel Kasman

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A Tribute To Tony Scott: The Fan

30 October 2012 6:32 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Tony Scott admitted in an interview for Film4 once that had Robert De Niro not been attached to The Fan, it would not have interested him. “The Fan was a go project and I wanted to work with Bobby DeNiro” Scott explained. “I didn’t have much interest in the script originally. In fact I’d passed on it twice before. But I very much wanted to work with Robert De Niro.”

The Fan follows down-on-his-luck knife-salesman, Gil Renard (De Niro), whose life is completely overrun by his obsession with baseball. When his favourite baseball team sign a new all-star player named Bobby Rayburn (Wesley Snipes), a new level of obsession is born in Gil. Abandoning his commitments to his job, his ex-wife and his son, Gil becomes fixated on helping an unaware Rayburn get out of his career slump and turn things around for the team – even if it »

- Gazz Howie

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Tony Scott had antidepressant in system but no cancer

23 October 2012 4:11 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Los Angeles coroner confirms that British film director's death was suicide

The British film-maker Tony Scott was on antidepressants and had taken sleeping medication before leaping from a Los Angeles suspension bridge in August but did not have cancer, a preliminary autopsy report suggests.

The La county coroner's office also confirmed yesterday that Scott's death was suicide, though his motive remains a mystery. A number of suicide notes reportedly contained no details of why the Top Gun director chose to kill himself. The report said Scott's immediate cause of death was blunt force trauma and drowning. Non-toxic levels of the antidepressant mirtazapine and the prescription sleeping pill Lunesta were in his system.

The last person to see Scott alive was a passerby parking his car on the Vincent Thomas bridge over Los Angeles harbour. He saw the director leap into the water just after noon on 19 August. Scott's body was »

- Ben Child

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Tony Scott Autopsy Report Released

23 October 2012 2:16 AM, PDT | WorstPreviews.com | See recent Worst Previews news »

On August 19th, director Tony Scott (Man on Fire, Enemy of the State) committed suicide by jumping off a Los Angeles bridge. Even though he left two notes behind, none of them revealed the reason for him taking his own life. Today, the Los Angeles Country coroner has released an autopsy report. But unfortunately, it also doesn't give us a reason for the suicide. It lists Scott's death as a suicide and says the cause was multiple blunt force injuries suffered from jumping off a bridge. It goes on to say that the director also drowned and had therapeutic levels of the anti-depressant Remeron and the sleep aid Lunesta in his system. »

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Tony Scott Death Ruled a Suicide

22 October 2012 4:14 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

The L.A. County Coroner has released the final cause of death for Top Gun director Tony Scott, who jumped from a Los Angeles bridge in late August, officially calling the manner of death a suicide.

Related: Tom Cruise & More React to Tony Scott's Death 

The Department of Coroner conducted an autopsy on the body of Anthony David Scott, age 68, on August 20, and the final cause of death has been determined to be multiple blunt force injuries, with drowning listed as one other significant condition. The toxicology reports a "therapeutic level of Mirtazipine (Remeron) which is an anti-depressant and zopiclone (Lunesta), a sleep-aid."

Related: Tony Scott Cremated

The director of such hits as Beverly Hills Cop II, Crimson Tide and Enemy of the State was the brother of filmmaker Ridley Scott and is survived by his wife Donna and two children. He reportedly left notes on his car and in his office before he jumped to his »

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This Mutant Life #12: Mark Millar Rights The Ship

18 October 2012 10:20 AM, PDT | MTV Splash Page | See recent MTV Splash Page news »

The value of a guru apparently can't be underestimated. Marvel Studios has Joss Whedon, who signed an exclusive deal to help oversee their film and television properties over the next few years. The X-Men, unofficially, have Bryan Singer, who's been involved in every one of their worthwhile properties. And a few weeks ago, 20th Century Fox announced that they'd hired established comics writer Mark Millar to oversee their properties, among which include the X-Men and the Fantastic Four.

A long-time writer on titles like "Ultimate X-Men," "The Authority," and his own creator-owned properties such as "Kick-Ass" and "Wanted," Millar made a name for himself as one of the most entertaining creators in comics. When he was writing company-owned characters, Millar's talents as a writer quickly shown through: an eye for big picture plotting, unrivaled ability for choreographing arresting action scenes, a skill for using continuity and shared universe as »

- Jeremy Gordon

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Mark Millar Talks More About His Role As 20th Century Fox's Marvel Creative Consultant

10 October 2012 5:30 AM, PDT | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

The news that Mark Millar (Kick-Ass, , Supercrooks, Wolverine: Enemy of the State) had been hired by 20th Century Fox as a creative consultant on their upcoming Marvel adaptations came as music to the ears of fans who were left disappointed by the likes of Elektra and X-Men: The Last Stand. In a 45 minute chat with Word Balloon, the writer has talked more about his role with the studio, even sharing his thoughts on their past, present and future projects. To listen to more of Millar's thoughts on the current state of Marvel and DC, Warner Bros.' planned Justice League movie, and why we won't see Miracle Park anytime soon (as well as a whole lot more), be sure to head on over to the site by clicking on the link below to check out the interview in full. "The job at Fox is officially "Creative Consultant" and if there's »

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SFotD: ‘Plurality’ Explores Sci-Fi Safety Vs. Personal Privacy with Sleek CGI

5 October 2012 12:00 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Why Watch? Channeling Enemy of the State, a chase is at the center of this slick short from Dennis Liu. It takes the rapidly approaching possibility of targeted advertising tied into our social network (which was explored in Minority Report) and extrapolates it into the security/privacy debate. It’s slightly enigmatic, using that as a hook that satisfies. The acting and writing are more than strong, but the real star here is the concept brought to life by a fully realized CGI world and pro-level camera work. Replace the faces here with big name stars, and this could be any larger budget science fiction attempt of the past decade. All of that to say that Liu clearly has the chops to play at the highest level. What will it cost you? Only 14 minutes. Skip work. Watch more short films. »

- Cole Abaius

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Mark Millar: The Right Man To Guide Fox's Marvel Movies?

28 September 2012 8:15 AM, PDT | MTV Splash Page | See recent MTV Splash Page news »

This week, Twentieth Century Fox announced that they’ve tapped longtime comic book scribe Mark Millar to serve as creative consultant on their film adaptations of Marvel Comics properties based on the "X-Men" and "Fantastic Four" series.

But what exactly is behind this move, and why did Fox choose Millar in particular to help guide these valuable franchises? To answer that, we need to take a look at Millar’s background both in comics and in Hollywood.

Millar began his writing career in the early ‘90s in his native UK, where he worked on such titles as the venerable 2000Ad, the comics magazine most notable for introducing Judge Dredd. With the help of his close friend and fellow Scotsman Grant Morrison, he was able to break into the American comics scene at DC Comics, where he initially co-wrote several series alongside Morrison. It was during this period that Millar would »

- Matt Adler

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