Dramatized portrayal of the Apollo manned space program.
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1  
1998  
Top Rated TV #74 | Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 21 wins & 32 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 Himself - Host / ... (12 episodes, 1998)
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 Deke Slayton (10 episodes, 1998)
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 Emmett Seaborn (6 episodes, 1998)
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 Frank Borman (5 episodes, 1998)
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 Gene Cernan (5 episodes, 1998)
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 Chris Kraft (5 episodes, 1998)
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Storyline

The twelve episodes follow the Apollo space program from a variety of viewpoints: (1) "Can We Do This?" maps the origins of Apollo and its Mercury and Gemini roots; (2) "Apollo 1" tells of the tragic fire and the subsequent finger-pointing; (3) "We Have Cleared the Tower" portrays the intense preparation for Apollo 7; (4) "1968" puts Apollo 8 into its historical context against events of the era; (5) "Spider" shows the engineering POV through the design, building, and testing of the LEMs with Apollos 9 and 10, (6) "Mare Tranquilitatis" shows the deeper considerations behind the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing; (7) "That's All There Is" portrays the camaraderie of the Apollo 12 crew; (8) "We Interrupt This Program" shows a by-now-indifferent media galvanized by the events of Apollo 13; (9) "For Miles and Miles" tells of Alan Shepherd's return to the manned program with Apollo 14 after being grounded between Mercury and Gemini; (10) "Galileo Was Right" show the non-piloting demands on ... Written by Kathy Li

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Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

5 April 1998 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

De la Tierra a la Luna  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$68,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(12 episodes)

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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Actor Bryan Cranston, who portrays Edwin Buzz Aldrin, also portrayed astronaut Virgil Gus Grissom in the movie "That Thing You Do! (1996)". His Gus Grissom is interviewed on the make believe TV show Hollywood Television Showcase in the latter. Tom Hanks produced both as well as directed "That Thing You Do! (1996)" and segments of "From the Earth to the Moon (1998)". See more »

Goofs

In the episode "Spider", a red, white and blue cooler appears during a scene taking place in the late 1960s. However, these patriotic coolers were not released until the bicentennial in 1976. See more »

Quotes

Ed White: [having been ordered to return to the Gemini capsule to conclude the first American spacewalk] I'm coming back in... and it's the saddest moment of my life.
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Connections

Features I Dream of Jeannie (1965) See more »

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User Reviews

The definitive chronicle of the American Space Program.
27 April 1999 | by (Lucas Buck, NC) – See all my reviews

Until the movie Apollo 13 came to the screen, many were unaware, or had forgotten of that event, or of the many facets, the visions, the energies that made up the American Space program in the 1960s. A program with a dictate set forth by President Kennedy: to get men to the moon, and return, safely, before the end of the decade.

This 12-hour (12 x one-hour segments) tribute is the personal mission of two-time Academy Award winner Tom Hanks, a man with a childhood love for the astronauts and the space program, and a man with enough clout to get this big-budget extravaganza made.

Each segment is in and of itself a story, each with a different point-of-view on the major aspects of the program. Certainly the main events-the first manned flight, the Apollo 1 fire, the lunar landing, the Apollo 13 emergency, are all there. But quite differently than what we've seen previously, here we have an opportunity to relive much of the day-to-day, aspects-the politics, the personalities, the emotions, of many, many of the key individuals. The astronauts, the engineers, the administrators, the news people, the wives-they all get wonderfully recognized.

Since I'm about the same age as Mr. Hanks, I admit to being a space freak myself as a youngster-at the time these events actually happened. At that time I waited every week, for Time, Newsweek and Life magazine to give me the pictures, and accounts of the activity at NASA.

It's oh so appropriate to have this wonderful tribute to this important piece of American history.


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