Dramatized portrayal of the Apollo manned space program.
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1  
1998  
Top Rated TV #61 | Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 21 wins & 32 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 Himself - Host / ... (12 episodes, 1998)
...
 Deke Slayton (10 episodes, 1998)
...
 Emmett Seaborn (6 episodes, 1998)
...
 Frank Borman (5 episodes, 1998)
...
 Gene Cernan (5 episodes, 1998)
...
 Chris Kraft (5 episodes, 1998)
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Storyline

The twelve episodes follow the Apollo space program from a variety of viewpoints: (1) "Can We Do This?" maps the origins of Apollo and its Mercury and Gemini roots; (2) "Apollo 1" tells of the tragic fire and the subsequent finger-pointing; (3) "We Have Cleared the Tower" portrays the intense preparation for Apollo 7; (4) "1968" puts Apollo 8 into its historical context against events of the era; (5) "Spider" shows the engineering POV through the design, building, and testing of the LEMs with Apollos 9 and 10, (6) "Mare Tranquilitatis" shows the deeper considerations behind the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing; (7) "That's All There Is" portrays the camaraderie of the Apollo 12 crew; (8) "We Interrupt This Program" shows a by-now-indifferent media galvanized by the events of Apollo 13; (9) "For Miles and Miles" tells of Alan Shepherd's return to the manned program with Apollo 14 after being grounded between Mercury and Gemini; (10) "Galileo Was Right" show the non-piloting demands on ... Written by Kathy Li

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

5 April 1998 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

De la Tierra a la Luna  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$68,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(12 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Three actors who played astronauts also played astronauts in Apollo 13 (1995), but they all played different astronauts from the ones they had before. David Andrews played Frank Borman (Apollo 8) in the miniseries, but Pete Conrad (Apollo 12) in the movie. Ben Marley played Roger Chaffee (Apollo 1, died in the fire) in the miniseries, but John Young (Apollo 10, Apollo 16, Shuttle) in the movie, and Brett Cullen played Dave Scott (Apollo 15) in the miniseries, but Jack Lousma (CAPCOM during Apollo 13, slated for Apollo 20 which was cancelled, flew Skylab 3 in 1973) in the movie. See more »

Goofs

In several episodes, Pelco video monitors that were not available in the 1960s are seen. See more »

Quotes

Astronaut Alan Shepard: I'm the best pilot they've got.
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Connections

Referenced in Flat Earth Clues: Empty Theatre (2015) See more »

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User Reviews

An inspirationally movie, a Must-See for Everyone
3 February 2001 | by (Minneapolis) – See all my reviews

From the Earth to the Moon is a stunning masterpiece that captures the triumph of a defining moment in the history of the world: Humankind's arrival to, short exploration of, and return from, it's planetary neighbor the Moon.

Tom Hanks brought together actors, writers, directors, producers, and composers of the highest caliber to deliver an accurate, outstanding, hard hitting film.

From the Earth to the Moon is a 12 hour movie spanning the United States involvement in the space race from the first man in space in 1961 to the last lunar landing in 1972. The movie teaches, gives insights, paints portraits of real people, and is simply fascinating.

The stories told in From the Earth to the Moon are inspiring, captivating, funny, thrilling, and heartbreaking. The true stories are absolutely unforgettable, stories of the men, women, and machines of the Apollo era.

All the stories presented in the film are special, and one that touched me was the story of Apollo 7. With the tragedy of Apollo 1, the movie reveals how Apollo 7 and its crew were America's last chance to make it happen. The movie beautifully presents the pressure Wally Shirra, his crew, and NASA were under before the lift-off of Apollo 7. Had Apollo 7 failed, the space program certainly would have stopped and the world would have never experienced Apollo 11's lunar landing.

The live footage shown from the Apollo 7 lift-off is awesome and spectacular. Generations from now will watch Apollo 7's lift-off to be amazed that humans could achieve such an engineering and technical marvel and scholars will debate in awe how the political, social, and economic environments of the time made such an event possible.

After viewing the entire movie, I was struck with sense of sadness. The Apollo program seemed to allow people's ideas to flourish and pull together around one common goal. That goal, of landing a man on the moon, was noble and exciting. It drew on man's positive strengths to explore, learn, move forward, and better the human condition. Someday, mankind must again reach for the stars.

From the Earth to the Moon will stay with you for a long, long time.


31 of 33 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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