6.9/10
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56 user 60 critic

Welcome to Sarajevo (1997)

R | | Drama, War | 26 November 1997 (USA)
Journalist Floyd from US, Michael Henderson from UK and their teams meet the beginning of Bosnian war in Sarajevo. During their reports they find an orphanage run by devoted Mrs. Savic near... See full summary »

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From $1.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Emira Nusevic ...
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Igor Dzambazov ...
Jacket
Gordana Gadzic ...
Mrs. Savic
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Helen Henderson
Drazen Sivak ...
Zeljko
Vesna Orel ...
Munira
Davor Janjic ...
Dragan
Vladimir Jokanovic ...
Emira's Uncle
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Storyline

Journalist Floyd from US, Michael Henderson from UK and their teams meet the beginning of Bosnian war in Sarajevo. During their reports they find an orphanage run by devoted Mrs. Savic near the front line. Henderson gets so involved in kids' problems that he decides to take on the children, Emira, illegally back to England. He is assisted by American aid worker Nina. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

To get the story, they'll risk everything. See more »

Genres:

Drama | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for brutal images/war atrocities and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

26 November 1997 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dobrodošli u Sarajevo  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$89,274 (USA) (30 November 1997)

Gross:

$339,648 (USA) (25 January 1998)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Stephen Dillane's son Frank plays his son in the film. See more »

Goofs

The song which plays as Michael and Risto enter the apartment to search for the mother, is "M.O.R." by Blur. This song was released in 1997, despite the movie taking place during the siege of Sarajevo, years earlier. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Title Card: In 1991, the country of Yugoslavia began to fracture into separate nations. On the pretext of maintaining Yugoslavia's integrity, the Serbian dominated Yugoslav army attacked first Slovenia, then Croatia.
Title Card: In April 1992, in the hope of securing international protection, Bosnia declared its independence. This was rejected by many Bosnian Serbs. Aided by the remnants of the Yugoslav army, they set out to claim as much territory as they could.
Title Card: They systematically cleansed towns and ...
[...]
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Connections

Featured in The Greatest Ever War Films (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Donovan
Written by Shaun Ryder (as S. Ryder), Paul Ryder (as P. Ryder), Mark Day (as M. Day), and Paul Davis (as P.Davis)
Performed by Happy Mondays
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User Reviews

 
A powerful tour through hell on Earth
3 August 1999 | by (Toronto, Canada) – See all my reviews

What "Welcome To Sarajevo" did was open my eyes and help me realize how fortunate I am. Sarajevo was a peaceful, metropolitan city not unlike many cities in North America. But it is no longer. It's almost too easy to clear your mind of the strife going on in other parts of the world. Sometimes we feel guilty for being so fortunate. Sometimes we feel horror at the news reports of inhuman atrocities. And most times we shut out the reality of it as it is rarely affecting us in a personal way.

This gripping tale of war-torn Sarajevo is told through the eyes of British reporters. It will probably shock, jar and depress you, but it will most certainly increase your sense of global awareness, and instill a better appreciation of the liberties that most of us have taken for granted. Images from concentration camps hauntingly mimic those from fifty years ago.

This film is based on an amazing true story of one man's personal involvement and promise to rescue one refugee child and the great lengths to which he must go to deliver her from a war zone.

I caught this film in its limited theatrical run following its inclusion in the 1997 Toronto Film Festival. I exited the theater with my wife in a staggering awe-struck state. No one could fully communicate what it would be like to live in a war zone, but this film gives you a potent taste without pulling any punches.

What this means is that most people will likely find it difficult to recommend this film to friends. It's not an uplifting tale, but it is an extremely important one, and I feel privileged and fortunate for having seen it.


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