6.9/10
6,145
56 user 60 critic

Welcome to Sarajevo (1997)

R | | Drama, War | 26 November 1997 (USA)
Journalist Floyd from US, Michael Henderson from UK and their teams meet the beginning of Bosnian war in Sarajevo. During their reports they find an orphanage run by devoted Mrs. Savic near... See full summary »

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Emira Nusevic ...
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Igor Dzambazov ...
Jacket
Gordana Gadzic ...
Mrs. Savic
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Helen Henderson
Drazen Sivak ...
Zeljko
Vesna Orel ...
Munira
Davor Janjic ...
Dragan
Vladimir Jokanovic ...
Emira's Uncle
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Storyline

Journalist Floyd from US, Michael Henderson from UK and their teams meet the beginning of Bosnian war in Sarajevo. During their reports they find an orphanage run by devoted Mrs. Savic near the front line. Henderson gets so involved in kids' problems that he decides to take on the children, Emira, illegally back to England. He is assisted by American aid worker Nina. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

To get the story, they'll risk everything. See more »

Genres:

Drama | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for brutal images/war atrocities and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

26 November 1997 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dobrodošli u Sarajevo  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$89,274 (USA) (28 November 1997)

Gross:

$339,648 (USA) (23 January 1998)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Stephen Dillane's son Frank plays his son in the film. See more »

Goofs

The song which plays as Michael and Risto enter the apartment to search for the mother, is "M.O.R." by Blur. This song was released in 1997, despite the movie taking place during the siege of Sarajevo, years earlier. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Title Card: In 1991, the country of Yugoslavia began to fracture into separate nations. On the pretext of maintaining Yugoslavia's integrity, the Serbian dominated Yugoslav army attacked first Slovenia, then Croatia.
Title Card: In April 1992, in the hope of securing international protection, Bosnia declared its independence. This was rejected by many Bosnian Serbs. Aided by the remnants of the Yugoslav army, they set out to claim as much territory as they could.
Title Card: They systematically cleansed towns and ...
[...]
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Soundtracks

Way Young Lovers Do
Written by Van Morrison
Performed by Van Morrison
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User Reviews

An important movie; wish more people would see it.
18 January 1999 | by (Roanoke, Virginia) – See all my reviews

It seems bitterly ironic that a movie about the war in Bosnia, ignored for the most part by the West, should have been ignored by moviegoers. I don't know what happened to the distribution of this movie (perhaps there is an explanation), but I suspect that many movie-goers just don't want to be troubled by the reality of what happened in Bosnia in the years that the movie so effectively depicts -- 1992-1995. It's a crying shame, because this is a powerful, beautiful story that focuses on a British journalist who must learn how to act on his moral outrage. As a former reporter, I empathized completely with his sense of disconnectedness from the terrible events he witnesses. But as the camera moves through the burned-out rubble of the city and its surroundings, the tension builds toward his inevitable actions and makes plain the movie's moral: that even when we feel we can do almost nothing, we should do whatever tiny bit we can. The message isn't heavy-handed; it is intelligently conveyed through top-notch performances from a solid cast (Woody Harrelson is perfectly convincing as the "cowboy" American journalist) and a script that does justice to the complexity of the Bosnian situation. Real news footage is mixed quite cleverly with the invented -- so well, in some cases, that it's hard to tell them apart. This isn't an easy movie to watch but it's worthwhile for those many of us who become confused and overwhelmed by the Bosnian situation. It's a powerful reminder, too, that being informed isn't enough; action is imperative. I greatly admired this movie.


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