7.0/10
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155 user 49 critic

Suicide Kings (1997)

A group of youngsters kidnap a respected Mafia figure.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mark Watson ...
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Jay Della ...
Bartender (as Jay Fiondella)
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Marcus (as Nathan Dana)
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Jeckyll
James Peter 'JP' O'Fallon Jr. ...
Kid #1
Nicholas Huttloff ...
Kid #2
Trent Bross ...
Maitre D'
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Storyline

Ex-mob boss Christopher Walken is kidnapped by a group of four kids in a haphazard attempt at paying the ransom for another, separate kidnapping. Complexities arise as the group cannot seem to do anything right. Written by Wells Oliver <s0ewoliv@titan.vcu.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Their plan was perfect... they weren't.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong violence and language, and for some nudity and drug use | See all certifications »

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 April 1998 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Jogo Suicida  »

Box Office

Budget:

$5,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$558,081 (USA) (17 April 1998)

Gross:

$1,692,872 (USA) (10 July 1998)
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

|

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The shot on TV with Heckel and Jeckel in the apartment is actually a snippet from Reservoir Dogs (1992). This is because the director could only use stock from other films owned by Artisan Entertainment. See more »

Goofs

When Heckle and Jekyll get the phone call telling them that the ransom money is ready, Jekyll's apron disappears and reappears between shots. See more »

Quotes

Charlie Barret: That phone call I got, it came from outside high walls and fancy gates; it comes from a place you know about maybe from the movies. But I come from out there, and everybody out there knows, everybody lies: cops lie, newspapers lie, parents lie. The one thing you can count on - word on the street... yeah, that's solid.
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Crazy Credits

The credits run like scratched up film is going through a projector (similar to the beginning of the film). The movie ends/post credits with this scratched film burning up and melting. See more »

Connections

References The Graduate (1967) See more »

Soundtracks

Grandma's Hands
Written by Bill Withers
Performed by Bill Withers
Courtesy of Columbia Records by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
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User Reviews

Creepy cool thriller
27 August 1999 | by (Morro Bay, Hammett Valley, Twin Rocks) – See all my reviews

It's hard to name a genre for Suicide Kings, so I put it in my beloved category of "twisted thriller". I compare it with movies like Reservoir Dogs, The Usual Suspects, U-Turn, Kalifornia, Wild Things, True Romance and A Simple Plan. Like all of the above, SK was violent, bloody and full of surprising twists. To add to its shadowy charm, it had a psychotic sense of humor. But the most amazing thing about this movie is Christopher Walken's subtly venomous performance, which complements the sharp, individualized performances of the younger cast members. Walken plays Charlie Barrett, a man who is unwittingly "recruited" to help five college-aged rich kids rescue one of their sisters, who has been kidnapped for a $2 million ransom. The five kids: nervous Avery (Henry Thomas), the one whose sis Elise (Laura Harris) is endangered; handsome Max (Sean Patrick Flanery), who is Elise's sweetheart; Brett (Jay Mohr), the one with a hell of an anger problem; aspiring doctor TK (Jeremy Sisto); and ultra-neurotic Ira (Johnny Galecki) whose house becomes a hideout for the kids after they kidnap Barrett. Brett concocts the plan. Max drugs him, TK severs one of his digits, and Charlie is duct-taped to a fancy office chair, hooked up to an IV which is pumping more drugs into him. Meantime, Avery broods nervously over his missing sis and Ira squeals endlessly about the blood TK is getting all over the nice varnished floor. While the boys bicker at each other about how to continue their insanely flawed caper, Barrett regards this group of inexperienced whipper-snappers with a myriad mix of sympathy, amusement and anger. But anger from a man like Charlie Barrett is not to be taken lightly, it is to be feared. Charlie is a man who with one spoken word, could have these five kids murdered and their bodies hidden where no one will ever find them. You know that from the minute you meet him, but the scariest thing about Charlie is his quiet mannerism. This serpent is indeed subtil. He does not shout, he gently whispers hints of warning to the kids that they've made a bad mistake messing with him. He taps into these kids early on, uncovering their dirty little family secrets and their own individual not-so-secret addictions, to drink, to drugs, to gambling. And he uses devices, honed from years of experience in a world these kids know nothing about, to his advantage. He may be physically incapacitated, he may be outnumbered, but he knows the kids are still no match for him. There's no arrogance in this knowledge, and it is truly creepy. It's a battle of wits that kept me on the edge of my seat, gave me the most delicious shivers of perverse anticipation, and it was honestly very hard to know which side to route for. I really love this movie. See it if you haven't. : )~


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