5.5/10
155
3 user 5 critic

Raigyo (1997)

A black clad woman murders a man that she had just met by chance through a phone sex club.

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Writers:

(screenplay),
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Cast

Cast overview:
Moe Sakura ...
Noriko Takahara
Takeshi Itô ...
Kazuaki Takahara
Takuji Suzuki ...
Hiroyuki Yanai
Ryûmei Homura ...
Michiko
Sumiko Nogi ...
Setsuko
Bunmei Tobayama ...
Tanaka
Kazuhiro Sano ...
Detective Ando
Tomohiro Okada ...
Detective Sakata
Mai Kawana ...
Yôko
Kazuya Sasaki ...
Man in pajamas
Yumi Yoshiyuki ...
Nurse
Yukiko Izumi ...
Shop Girl at Children's Wear Store
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Storyline

A black clad woman murders a man that she had just met by chance through a phone sex club.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

31 May 1997 (Japan)  »

Also Known As:

Kuroi shitagi no onna: Raigyo  »

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Technical Specs

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User Reviews

 
Bleak and opaque
18 September 2015 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

Raigyo is sold as 'Pinku Eiga' ('Pink Cinema' - Japan's surprisingly creative take on Erotica) but there's not a lot of sex, and virtually no eroticism to justify the tag. Instead we get a bleak, but engaging journey into mental illness, disconnection and psychopathy. If I'm honest, after watching the yawn-fest that was Kokkuri, I didn't expect much from Zeze, but here he proves himself to be a filmmaker of some skill. Raigyo perfectly captures a sense of desolate liminality - the action taking place in a part-marshland, part-industrial hinterland. The characters too, hover somewhere between intrigue and inscrutability; misfits, like the snake-headed fish of the film's title.

Given its short run time, Raigyo, is, if anything, a little too opaque for its own good. The violence is explicit - and shocking in its banality - but the protagonists' motivations and back stories are barely fleshed out at all. We're plunged right into the here and now, and, like the police in the film, left to fill in the blanks. The final CCTV tracking shot brings this point home, as Yanai and his strange companion disappear into the crowd. In a way though, its refusal to explain is a large part of the film's appeal.


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