6.8/10
30,540
101 user 33 critic

Private Parts (1997)

The autobiographical story of Howard Stern, the radio rebel who is now also a TV personality, an author and a movie star.

Director:

Writers:

(book), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Popularity
2,699 ( 2,220)

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC

Comic-Con 2017: All Aboard the IMDboat

 | 

July 20 to 23, 2017

Get entertainment news, trailer drops, and photos with IMDb's coverage of 2017 San Diego Comic-Con featuring host and IMDboat captain Kevin Smith, including Saturday's live event.

Browse Our Guide to Comic-Con

2 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Himself
...
Robin Quivers
...
...
...
...
Gary Dell'Abate
...
Jackie Martling
...
...
...
...
...
Griff
Paul Hecht ...
...
...
Roger Erlick
Edit

Storyline

Having always wanted to be a disc-jockey, Howard Stern works his way painfully from radio at his 1970's college to a Detroit station. It is with a move to Washington that he hits on an outrageous off-the-wall style that catches audience attention. Despite his on-air blue talk, at home he is a loving husband. He needs all the support he can get when he joins NBC in New York and comes up against a very different vision of radio. Written by Jeremy Perkins <jwp@aber.ac.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Never before has a man done so much with so little. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, nudity and crude sexual humor | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

7 March 1997 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Howard Stern's Private Parts  »

Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$14,616,333 (USA) (7 March 1997)

Gross:

$41,198,146 (USA) (6 June 1997)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Howard Stern appears on Late Night with David Letterman (1982) wearing a T-shirt reading "On Strike Against NBC" and openly criticizes the network while Paul Giamatti plays an executive who watches this on TV in dismay. Giamatti later starred as Harvey Pekar in American Splendor (2003) which features a scene where Pekar causes a stir when he criticizes NBC on the same show while wearing a T-shirt with the same words written on it (which happened in real life). See more »

Goofs

When Howard's chicken is run over, the bucket cap is placed differently when the camera switches. See more »

Quotes

[on why Howard is playing himself in college instead of someone younger]
Howard Stern: I know I seem a little too old to be in College. But for this movie you've gotta suspend disbelief.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Stern cohort 'Stuttering John' Melendez rants about Howard not putting him in the movie. See more »

Connections

References The Ed Sullivan Show (1948) See more »

Soundtracks

Pretend
Written by Lew Douglas, Cliff Parman, Dan Belloc & Frank LaVera
Performed by Nat 'King' Cole (as Nat King Cole)
Courtesy of Capitol Records
Under License from EMI-Capitol Music Special Markets
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
This could have been so bad: instead, it's a masterpiece
24 January 2007 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

I SO enjoyed this movie.

I watched this movie without realizing until close to the end that Howard Stern was playing himself.

I was a radio announcer myself, during the period when Stern got going. This movie has the 'feel' of reality to it. I recognized so many of the people I worked with in this movie. Every radio station has some of them. The studios of the period were just like this.

Of course, this movie was severely compressed in time and space. Radio is like warfare: lengthy periods of utter boredom punctuated by periods of pure panic. We don't need to see the slow bits. Each hour of on-air radio presentation requires something like three hours of preparation: we don't see the hard work that goes into such a show.

We do see a very funny and entertaining movie. Don't forget, I was in the industry at the time this all happened: and this one feels 'real' to me.

Many autobiographical pieces by "stars" turn into awful sycophantic schmaltz-fests. This one didn't. It could have been awful. Most of this kind are. This one... is excellent.

And if you've never worked in broadcasting -- it's still very funny!


13 of 16 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?