5.5/10
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Picasso in München (1997)

| Drama
The painter Picasso awakes from the dead, steals one of his paintings from a psychiatrist's and his wife's kitchen and wanders through Munich, where he meets the psychiatrist's patient, ... See full summary »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Herbert Achternbusch ...
Doris Jung ...
Takla Bash
Naomi Semiramis ...
Takla Bash als Kind
Barbara Gass ...
Fregatte
Josef Bierbichler ...
Dr. Brösel (as Sepp Bierbichler)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Cecil Adrjii
Franz Baumgartner ...
Franz
Christa Berndl
Rudi Eydmann
Herbert Freudenberger
Gabi Geist
Micki Joanni
Silvia-Maria Jung
Nannie-Ana Kuntz
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Storyline

The painter Picasso awakes from the dead, steals one of his paintings from a psychiatrist's and his wife's kitchen and wanders through Munich, where he meets the psychiatrist's patient, Takla Bash, and falls in love with her. Ignoring that she is actually his daughter he plans a phenomenal love affair including a film about a blue cow. This surreal film includes many of director/writer/star Herbert Achternbusch's own paintings. Written by Mort-31

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Drama

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Picasso in Munich  »

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User Reviews

 
Herbert Achternbusch works on Picasso, and we are supposed to say uh-huh
27 December 2003 | by (Vienna, Austria) – See all my reviews

I think it is almost impossible to understand Achternbusch's work entirely because he stuffs it with subjective views noone except him is able to appreciate. His scenes are funny, really bizarre but the Brechtian way of directing (having untalented actresses speak their lines without any palpable emotion) makes the humour move to the background, so the film is exhausting to watch in the first place. Take this as a warning.

Herbert Achternbusch has recorded his own private interest in Picasso on film (including admittedly excellent Picassoesque paintings by the filmmaker himself), and we are supposed to watch and say uh-huh. I found it quite interesting and original, yet it was a clearly brain- and not at all heart-shattering experience.


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