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Monte Merrick Dies; Writer Penned 1990 film ‘Memphis Belle’

Monte Merrick Dies; Writer Penned 1990 film ‘Memphis Belle’
Monte L. Merrick, an accomplished and successful playwright, novelist and screenwriter probably best known for the screenplay for the film “Memphis Belle,” died in Santa Monica on March 24, following a battle with cancer . He was 65.

The 1990 film “Memphis Belle,” directed by Michael Caton-Jones, starred Harry Connick Jr., Eric Stoltz and Matthew Modine in the WWII story of the U.K.-based crew of a B-17 bomber who must go on one last mission, over the heavily defended city of Bremen, Germany.

Most recently, Merrick wrote the screenplay for the indie “Skating to New York,” released in December 2014.

He also penned the 1997 Disney TV version of “Oliver Twist,” starring Richard Dreyfuss and Elijah Wood; films including 1994 rodeo story “8 Seconds,” 1992 Tom Selleck starrer “Mr. Baseball” and the Lee Grant-directed 1989 dramedy “Staying Together”; and the TV movie “Miracle at Midnight.” His plays, produced Off Broadway in New York and throughout the country at regional theaters,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Monte Merrick Dies; Writer Penned 1990 film ‘Memphis Belle’

Monte Merrick Dies; Writer Penned 1990 film ‘Memphis Belle’
Monte L. Merrick, an accomplished and successful playwright, novelist and screenwriter probably best known for the screenplay for the film “Memphis Belle,” died in Santa Monica on March 24, following a battle with cancer . He was 65.

The 1990 film “Memphis Belle,” directed by Michael Caton-Jones, starred Harry Connick Jr., Eric Stoltz and Matthew Modine in the WWII story of the U.K.-based crew of a B-17 bomber who must go on one last mission, over the heavily defended city of Bremen, Germany.

Most recently, Merrick wrote the screenplay for the indie “Skating to New York,” released in December 2014.

He also penned the 1997 Disney TV version of “Oliver Twist,” starring Richard Dreyfuss and Elijah Wood; films including 1994 rodeo story “8 Seconds,” 1992 Tom Selleck starrer “Mr. Baseball” and the Lee Grant-directed 1989 dramedy “Staying Together”; and the TV movie “Miracle at Midnight.” His plays, produced Off Broadway in New York and throughout the country at regional theaters,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

DVD Playhouse--August 2012

By Allen Gardner

A Separation (Sony) This drama from Iran won the 2011 Best Foreign Film Oscar, telling the story of a couple who file for a legal separation, with the wife pushing for a divorce. He won’t leave his Alzheimer’s-afflicted father behind, while she is wanting to take their young daughter with her to the United States. After a series of misunderstandings, threats and legal actions, the couple find that there is more than just their marriage that’s on the line. Hyper-realistic to a fault, reminiscent of the neo-realist films that came out of post-ww II Europe, but also repressive and redundant in the extreme, with the characters seeming to throw the same temper tantrum for two hours straight while the story, meanwhile, seems stalled. Wildly overpraised film is a real litmus test, with viewers seeming to be staunch defenders or equally impassioned detractors. It did win an Oscar,
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Anna Massey Dead at 73: Worked for Alfred Hitchcock, Michael Powell, Otto Preminger

Anna Massey, a Tony nominee who played supporting roles in more than 40 movies, died of cancer on Sunday, July 3, in London. Massey was 73. The daughter of Academy Award nominee Raymond Massey (Abe Lincoln in Illinois) and sister of another Oscar nominee, Daniel Massey (Star!), Anna Massey began her acting career in the late '50s. She was nominated for a Tony for her performance in The Reluctant Debutante (1958), which was made into a movie that same year. Directed by Vincente Minnelli, the movie version starred Sandra Dee as an Americanized version of the role Massey had originated in the West End and on Broadway. Massey's first film appearance also took place in 1958, in John Ford's crime drama Gideon's Day, starring Jack Hawkins. Other notable film roles, invariably supporting bigger names, include those in Michael Powell's controversial Peeping Tom (photo, 1960), with Karl Böhm as a fetishistic serial killer; Otto Preminger
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Casting Calls scheduled for feature film version of Dean Koontz bestseller novel ’Odd Thomas’

The first film in the "Odd Thomas" quadrilogy is now in pre-production and auditions for the film's cast is underway. The four novels are titled "Odd Thomas," "Forever Odd," "Brother Odd," and "Odd Hours". Minnesota native Stephen Sommers will direct "Odd Thomas," and he also wrote the screenplay adapted from author Dean Koontz' New York Times Bestseller novel.

Steven Sommers has been the writer/director on such films as "The Adventures of Huck Finn," "The Jungle Book," "The Mummy," "The Mummy Returns," "Van Helsing," and "G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra". John Baldecchi and Howard Kaplan of John Baldecchi Productions will co-produce "Odd Thomas" with Steven Sommers. Baldecci has worked with Sommers in the past as co-producer on Disney's Oliver Twist and executive producer of Disney's "The Adventures of Huck Finn". Louis Rosner will executive produce.

Starring and co-starring roles are being cast in Los Angeles while supporting and
See full article at LA Acting Auditions »

Where are all the other great shark movies?

One great ferocious fish film just isn't enough, says Joe Queenan. Nor is one exploding bus movie. So why won't Hollywood go back to a good idea unless it's for a remake or a sequel?

Thirty-five years ago this summer, the first and only great movie about great white sharks debuted. It was in fact the first and only great movie about sharks, period. The third full-length Steven Spielberg feature, and the first one with a serious budget, Jaws is one of the most admired and, in a certain way, beloved films ever made. It is also one of the most influential; after the success of Jaws, followed two years later by Star Wars, the age of expensive, hi-tech film-making was upon us, and Hollywood would never be the same.

Jaws made Roy Scheider, previously a little-noticed character actor, a star; it made Richard Dreyfuss, an annoying, neurotic, nerdy sort of fellow,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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