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Frank Vincent, ‘Sopranos’ and ‘Goodfellas’ Actor, Dies at 78

Frank Vincent, ‘Sopranos’ and ‘Goodfellas’ Actor, Dies at 78
Frank Vincent, known for portraying Phil Leotardo on “The Sopranos,” has died, his “Sopranos” co-star Vincent Pastore announced on Facebook. He was 78.

TMZ reports that he died due to complications of heart surgery after a heart attack. John Gallagher, who directed Vincent in “Street Hunter” and “The Deli,” also posted the news on Facebook.

Vincent began acting in 1976 when he co-starred in the low-budget crime film “The Death Collector” alongside Joe Pesci. Vincent then acted in Martin Scorsese’s “Raging Bull,” which sparked the first of many collaborations between Vincent, Pesci, and Robert De Niro, including “Goodfellas” and “Casino.”‘

His “Sopranos” character was killed on orders from his on-screen nemesis Tony Soprano is the final episode of the HBO series.

Born in North Adams, Mass., and raised in Jersey City, N.J., Vincent often portrayed gangsters. He delivered the iconic line, “Go home and get your shine box!” as mobster Billy Batts in “Goodfellas,” and
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Remembering Sidney Lumet

April 9th will mark the four year anniversary of director Sidney Lumet's passing, at age 86. Lumet was the first director I interviewed whose one-sheet posters hung on my wall as a kid. He was an idol, an icon, and an inspiration. I wasn't yet 30 in April 1997, when I met him at The Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills for our interview at the press junket for "Night Falls On Manhattan," one of his solid, authentic urban dramas that blended crime, politics and personal revelations that became his signature.

Lumet immediately put any butterflies I had at ease. Diminutive, but with the infectious energy of a teenager, his was a disarming presence. He paid me a compliment on my sportcoat, saying that I looked a bit like the young Mickey Rourke (which I still don't see, but what the hell), then went on to regale me for an hour with
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Andy Garcia: The Hollywood Interview

Andy Garcia Finds Love At Middleton

By

Alex Simon

Since making a splash as crack shot George Stone in Brian De Palma’s The Untouchables, Andy Garcia has become one of the cinema’s most prolific and diverse actors. The Cuban-born Garcia boasts over 100 credits on his resume, with roles ranging from actor, director, producer and musical performer. At Middleton, which arrived on DVD and Blu-ray April 1 from Anchor Bay Entertainment, features Garcia as a slightly befuddled doctor who finds an unexpected love connection with another parent (Vera Farmiga) while accompanying their kids on a tour of a tony East Coast college. Andy Garcia spoke with us recently about this and other career highlights. Here’s what transpired:

I don’t think I’ve ever seen you play a guy who’s not cool, so it was a pleasant surprise to see you in At Middleton, which marks a change of pace.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

James Gandolfini: Academy pays tribute at 2014 Oscars

The Sopranos and Man Who Wasn't There star who died in June 2013 remembered at Oscar ceremony

• Xan Brooks liveblogs the ceremony

• Full list of winners as they're announced

The Oscars paid tribute to James Gandolfini, the award-winning actor who died last year – devoting part of its traditional In Memoriam section to the actor best known for the TV show The Sopranos.

Gandolfini began his career as a bit-part film actor, before moving up to bigger roles in the likes of Sidney Lumet's Night Falls on Manhattan, which he played corrupt cop Joey Allegretto. But it was on the small screen that Gandolfini really made his mark, as mobster Tony Soprano in David Chase's multi-award-winning HBO show. Gandolfini then went on to secure major roles in films such as The Man Who Wasn't There, for the Coen brothers, In the Loop for Armando Iannucci, and Jake Scott's Welcome to the Rileys.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

James Gandolfini obituary

Us actor best known for his role as the mafia boss Tony Soprano

James Gandolfini, who has died aged 51 of a heart attack, was one of those rare actors who was able to portray a violent, bullying, murderous, vulgar, serial adulterer, while simultaneously eliciting sympathy and understanding from television audiences. In 86 episodes from 1999 to 2007, in HBO's hit series The Sopranos, the balding, beefy, middle-aged Gandolfini, as Tony Soprano, a New Jersey mafia boss, managed to transcend any stereotyping of Italian-Americans (although the charge was still made) by showing the flawed character's vulnerable side.

While Tony Soprano does embody the close-knit Italian-American community, with its codes of masculinity, Gandolfini, who had studied the Sanford Meisner method of acting for two years, lived up to Meisner's exhortation to "find in yourself those human things which are universal". Gandolfini always claimed to be nothing like Tony Soprano: "I'm really basically just like a 260-pound Woody Allen.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

James Gandolfini obituary

Us actor best known for his role as the mafia boss Tony Soprano

James Gandolfini, who has died aged 51 of a heart attack, was one of those rare actors who was able to portray a violent, bullying, murderous, vulgar, serial adulterer, while simultaneously eliciting sympathy and understanding from television audiences. In 86 episodes from 1999 to 2007, in HBO's hit series The Sopranos, the balding, beefy, middle-aged Gandolfini, as Tony Soprano, a New Jersey mafia boss, managed to transcend any stereotyping of Italian-Americans (although the charge was still made) by showing the flawed character's vulnerable side.

While Tony Soprano does embody the close-knit Italian-American community, with its codes of masculinity, Gandolfini, who had studied the Sanford Meisner method of acting for two years, lived up to Meisner's exhortation to "find in yourself those human things which are universal". Gandolfini always claimed to be nothing like Tony Soprano: "I'm really basically just like a 260-pound Woody Allen.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

James Gandolfini: his film career in clips

James Gandolfini died today; though The Sopranos was his defining part, he had a distinguished career on the big screen. Here we look back at the pick of his roles

Growing up in a devoutly Roman Catholic working class Italian-American family in New Jersey, it would be no surprise that James Gandolfini quickly found film roles as mob enforcers, brutal hit men and other assorted mafiosi when he got interested in acting in the mid-80s. After a string of small roles, Gandolfini made a major impact in True Romance, the Quentin Tarantino-scripted thriller directed by the late Tony Scott.

Gandolfini benefitted from the Tarantino effect again with Get Shorty, the Elmore Leonard adaptation that gained traction after the success of Qt's Pulp Fiction, featuring that film's star John Travolta. Gandolfini again plays a hoodlum, Bear - though one who does a bit of movie stuntwork on the side.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

James Gandolfini's Best Movie Roles

James Gandolfini's Best Movie Roles
James Gandolfini was best known for his work on the HBO series "The Sopranos," but the New Jersey-born star also enjoyed a fruitful film career.

Gandolfini died on Wednesday in Italy at the age of 51. His death, first reported by Deadline.com, was the result of a fatal heart attack.

Gandolfini's first credited role was as an orderly in the 1987 film "Shock! Shock! Shock!" He received major notices, however, for a small but memorable scene in the 1993 Tony Scott movie "True Romance." (Warning: Link Nsfw.)

Gandolfini reunited with Scott for "Crimson Tide" in 1995; that year also found him starring in "Get Shorty" as Bear, a gruff and physical bodyguard with a heart of gold. Other supporting parts in "A Civil Action," "8Mm," "She's So Lovely," "The Juror" and "Night Falls On Manhattan" soon followed.

After winning the role of Tony Soprano on "The Sopranos" in 1999, Gandolfini took a break from films.
See full article at Huffington Post »

More Than Tony Soprano: Gandolfini Featured in Dozens of Big-Screen Productions

James Gandolfini movies James Gandolfini died today of a suspected heart attack while in Rome, Italy. Although the 51-year-old actor’s fame rests on his role as mob boss Tony Soprano in the hit HBO series The Sopranos, which earned him three Emmy Awards, three SAG Awards, and one Golden Globe, Gandolfini was also featured in dozens of big-screen productions. Most notable among James Gandolfini’s movie are the following: Joel Coen and Ethan Coen’s The Man Who Wasn’t There (2001), in which Gandolfini plays Big Dave Brewster, a boisterous department store owner who may be having an affair with Billy Bob Thornton’s wife, Frances McDormand, and who’s being (anonymously) blackmailed by Thornton himself. Steven Zaillian’s remake of All the King’s Men (2006), starring Sean Penn as a populist Southern politician, with Gandolfini as fellow ruthless politician Tiny Duffy, demoted to Lieutenant Governor. Armando Iannucci’s
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

R.I.P. James Gandolfini (1961-2013)

Some shocking and heartbreaking news at the end of the day today, as HBO have confirmed that three-time Emmy winner and three-time SAG winner James Gandolfini, best known for playing mobster Tony Soprano in the acclaimed series "The Sopranos," has passed away from a stroke at the age of 51. He's survived by his wife Deborah Lin and a teenage son from a previous marriage. Born in 1961 in Westwood, New Jersey to Italian parents, Gandolfini was a Rutgers grad who worked as a bartender, bouncer, and club manager before coming to acting through his friend Roger Bart. He made his screen debut in 1987's "Shock! Shock! Shock!" before small roles followed in Tony Scott's "The Last Boy Scout," Sidney Lumet's "A Stranger Among Us" and most memorably, Scott and Quentin Tarantino's "True Romance." Larger and larger parts followed, usually as tough guys in heavies, in major movies including "Terminal Velocity,
See full article at The Playlist »

James Gandolfini Dead at 51

James Gandolfini Dead at 51
James Gandolfini, who brought a balance of intensity and vulnerability to his portrayal of conflicted mob boss Tony Soprano that made him among the most respected actors of his generation, died Wednesday in Rome. He was 51 and was believed to have suffered a heart attack.

See Also: James Gandolfini’s Unlikely Stardom

According to the Taormina Film Festival, he was on his way to the film festival where he was expected Thursday. He had been expected to participate in an onstage conversation with Italian director Gabriele Muccino on Saturday at the Sicilian festival.

Gandolfini’s commanding screen presence was the driving force in establishing “The Sopranos” as the most influential TV show of the past generation. The actor was praised for his deft juggling of the character’s violence and sensitivity, making the murderous crime lord a sympathetic figure that set the mold for the flawed anti-heroes that populate cable dramas today.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

James Gandolfini Dead at 51

James Gandolfini Dead at 51
James Gandolfini, who brought a balance of intensity and vulnerability to his portrayal of conflicted mob boss Tony Soprano that made him among the most respected actors of his generation, died Wednesday in Rome. He was 51 and was believed to have suffered a heart attack.

See Also: James Gandolfini’s Unlikely Stardom

According to the Taormina Film Festival, he was on his way to the film festival where he was expected Thursday. He had been expected to participate in an onstage conversation with Italian director Gabriele Muccino on Saturday at the Sicilian festival.

Gandolfini’s commanding screen presence was the driving force in establishing “The Sopranos” as the most influential TV show of the past generation. The actor was praised for his deft juggling of the character’s violence and sensitivity, making the murderous crime lord a sympathetic figure that set the mold for the flawed anti-heroes that populate cable dramas today.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

James Gandolfini: Friends, Family Mourn Acting 'Genius'

  • Moviefone
by Lynn Elber, AP

Los Angeles (AP) - James Gandolfini, whose portrayal of a brutal, emotionally delicate mob boss in HBO's "The Sopranos" was the brilliant core of one of TV's greatest drama series and turned the mobster stereotype on its head, died Wednesday in Italy. He was 51.

Gandolfini died while on holiday in Rome, the cable channel and Gandolfini's managers Mark Armstrong and Nancy Sanders said in a joint statement. No cause of death was given.

[Related: James Gandolfini Dies of Heart Attack at 51 (Report)]

"He was a genius," said "Sopranos" creator David Chase. "Anyone who saw him even in the smallest of his performances knows that. He is one of the greatest actors of this or any time. A great deal of that genius resided in those sad eyes."

Gandolfini, who won three Emmy Awards for his role as Tony Soprano, worked steadily in film and on stage after the series ended. He earned a 2009 Tony Award
See full article at Moviefone »

Why Sidney Lumet Fought the Law

Why Sidney Lumet Fought the Law
Everett Collection Director Sidney Lumet (center) directing Al Pacino (back right), on set, 1975

Legendary New York film director, Sidney Lumet, who had been nominated for five Academy Awards before winning one for lifetime achievement in 2005, died this past Saturday at the age of 86.

He directed over 50 films and another 200 teleplays during Television’s Golden Age in the 1950s, but for many he will be remembered most for his iconic films about the legal system: “12 Angry Men,” “The Verdict,” “Daniel,” “Find Me Guilty
See full article at Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal »

Remember Me: Sidney Lumet (1924-2011)

One of the true giants passed away this week: filmmaker Sidney Lumet, dead at 86 of lymphoma.

He was one of an incredibly talented class of directors who graduated from the early days of TV; a group which included such august talents as Arthur Penn (Bonnie and Clyde, 1967), George Roy Hill (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1969), John Frankenheimer (The Manchurian Candidate, 1962), Arthur Hiller (The Hospital, 1971), Franklin J. Schaffner (Patton, 1970), Norman Jewison (In the Heat of the Night, 1967), Robert Mulligan (To Kill a Mockingbird, 1962), Martin Ritt (Hud, 1963), and Sam Peckinpah (The Wild Bunch, 1969). Only Jewison is left, now, and as each has passed, mainstream American moviemaking has gotten a little louder, a little emptier, and a little dumber.

TV drama in the early days was almost like good theater: it was usually live, smart, provocative, rich with real-world character and sharp dialogue. Very early on, Lumet was considered one of the
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Sidney Lumet obituary

Prolific film director with a reputation for exploring social and moral issues

Sidney Lumet, who has died aged 86, achieved critical and commercial success with his first film, 12 Angry Men (1957), which established his credentials as a liberal director who was sympathetic to actors, loved words and worked quickly. For the bulk of his career, he averaged a film a year, earning four Oscar nominations along the way for best director, for 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976) and The Verdict (1982).

It is arguable that, had he not been so prolific, Lumet's critical reputation would have been greater. Certainly, for every worthwhile film there was a dud, and occasionally a disaster, to match it. But Lumet loved to direct and he was greatly esteemed by the many actors – notably Al Pacino and Sean Connery – with whom he established a lasting rapport.

The majority of his films were shot not in Hollywood, but in and around New York.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sidney Lumet obituary

Prolific film director with a reputation for exploring social and moral issues

Sidney Lumet, who has died aged 86, achieved critical and commercial success with his first film, 12 Angry Men (1957), which established his credentials as a liberal director who was sympathetic to actors, loved words and worked quickly. For the bulk of his career, he averaged a film a year, earning four Oscar nominations along the way for best director, for 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976) and The Verdict (1982).

It is arguable that, had he not been so prolific, Lumet's critical reputation would have been greater. Certainly, for every worthwhile film there was a dud, and occasionally a disaster, to match it. But Lumet loved to direct and he was greatly esteemed by the many actors – notably Al Pacino and Sean Connery – with whom he established a lasting rapport.

The majority of his films were shot not in Hollywood, but in and around New York.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Legendary director Sidney Lumet dies at 86

  • Cineplex
Sidney Lumet, the award-winning director of such acclaimed films as Network, Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon and 12 Angry Men, has died. He was 86.

Lumet's death was confirmed Saturday by Marc Kusnetz, who is the husband of Lumet's stepdaughter, Leslie Gimbel. He said Lumet died during the night and had suffered from lymphoma.

A Philadelphia native, Lumet moved to New York City as a child, and it became the location of choice for more than 30 of his films. Although he freely admitted to a lifelong love affair with the city, he often showed its grittier side.

Such dramas as Prince of the City, Q&A, Night Falls on Manhattan and Serpico looked at the hard lives and corruptibility of New York police officers. Dog Day Afternoon told the true-life story of two social misfits who set in motion a chain of disastrous events when they tried to rob a New York City
See full article at Cineplex »

R.I.P. Sidney Lumet

Filmmaking legend Sidney Lumet has passed away at the age of 86 from lymphoma. With a career spanning over five decades, Lumet has long been held high as one of the great filmmakers of all time by many of the great filmmakers of our time.

Starting out as a director of off-Broadway productions and then a highly respected TV director, he's one of the most prolific directors ever with a knack for not just working well with actors but shooting extremely quickly which allowed for a high turnover of work.

Throughout the 50's he directed hundred of episodes of television series like "Danger" and "You Are There" along with a similar amount of TV play adaptations for anthology series like "Playhouse 90" and "Studio One". Thus by the time of his first feature film, he was already extremely experienced behind the camera.

That first film also became arguably his signature work - "12 Angry Men". The 1957 drama,
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Film News: Legendary Director Sidney Lumet Dies at 86

Chicago – The entire film industry mourns the passing of one of its best directors, Sidney Lumet, who has left us at the age of 86. The Oscar-nominated director succumbed to Lymphoma after a career that spanned decades and generations, inspiring countless filmmakers, critics, and movie fans around the world.

Sidney Lumet

To say that the career of Sidney Lumet was impressive would be a massive understatement. Very few filmmakers in history delivered at such a high caliber for so many years. For six decades, Lumet knocked it out of the park again and again. Even his misfires were usually more interesting than other filmmakers.

Lumet was nominated four times for the Oscar for Best Director (“12 Angry Men,” “Dog Day Afternoon,” “Network,” and “The Verdict”) and once for Best Screenplay (“Prince of the City”) but never took home the prize, winning an honorary statue in 2005.

Born in Philadelphia, Sidney Lumet started as
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »
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