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1-20 of 131 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Bam, pow, ker-ching! How Scarlett Johansson became box office queen

19 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

She’s made several critically adored films and has an unmistakeable voice – but it’s action movies, and her role as Black Widow, where the actor rules the roost

When it comes to box office figures, Scarlett Johansson currently makes far more money than Will Smith.

It’s an astonishing statistic. Smith was once dubbed the “box office king” thanks to the barnstorming success of Independence Day and the Men in Black films. Collectively, his films have made more than $2.8bn in the Us alone.

Continue reading »

- Nigel M Smith

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Will Smith Admits He Made ‘Wild Wild West’ for All the Wrong Reasons

27 June 2016 2:30 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Will Smith was once the king of the summer. After hits like Independence Day and Men in Black made huge bank during blockbuster season, So Warner Bros. thought they could count on rack up some cash for the studio with a film adaptation of the classic TV show Wild Wild West, and they weren’t entirely […]

The post Will Smith Admits He Made ‘Wild Wild West’ for All the Wrong Reasons appeared first on /Film. »

- Ethan Anderton

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3 Reasons Why ‘Independence Day: Resurgence’ Bombed at the U.S. Box Office

27 June 2016 10:49 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Independence Day: Resurgence” didn’t set off any early fireworks at the U.S. box office over the weekend. The sequel to the 1996 hit (the highest-grossing movie of its year) only opened with $41.6 million. To put things into perspective, the original “Independence Day” kicked off to $50.2 million, back when tickets were less than half of what they are priced at now. But executives at Fox might not be sweating too much, since “Resurgence” (which cost $165 million) did much better internationally with a tally of $102.1 million abroad. In China, it scored an impressive $37.3 million debut.

Still, it’s troubling for Hollywood that the sequel named after a patriotic summer holiday wouldn’t generate more interest among U.S. ticket buyers. Here are three reasons why “Resurgence” suffered at home.

1. The Sequel Needed Will Smith

The original “Independence Day” kicked off Smith’s career as a major box office draw, a status »

- Ramin Setoodeh

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30 years ago today: The Goblin King lured us into ‘Labyrinth’

27 June 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Labyrinth, starring late rock icon Davie Bowie as the Goblin King, opened in theaters 30 years ago today. Though Labyrinth — a dark, wonderfully weird, glam rock semi-musical populated mostly by puppets — was never going to be a movie that won over a wide audience, it’s still wild to think about how poorly it did upon release given the film now has a secure place in pop culture history and in Bowie’s legacy. It opened at no. 8 at the U.S. box office and earned less than $13 million, barely over half of its reported budget. It was the final film directed by Jim Henson, and in the aftermath of Labyrinth’s poor reception, son Brian said of his father, “that was the closest I've seen him to turning in on himself and getting quite depressed.” Though Henson never got to witness the full fandom that would amass around the movie, »

- Emily Rome

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What Does Will Smith Really Think About Wild Wild West?

23 June 2016 6:05 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

This summer marks the 20th Anniversary of the hit blockbuster Independence Day, which turned Will Smith into a massive superstar overnight. It became the first movie ever to gross more than $500 million worldwide, and, naturally, after that movie started raking it in at the box office, everyone wanted Will Smith in their movies. Over the next few years, Will Smith would go on to star in hits such as Men in Black and Enemy of the State, but the actor recently addressed one of his missteps, the 1999 Western action adaptation of the Wild Wild West TV show which brought in some sci-fi elemenst to boot.

Wild Wild West wasn't an absolute bomb in theaters, but it still came in far below the rest of his hits over the late 1990s. Wild Wild West took in $113.4 million domestically and $222.1 million worldwide, from a hefty $170 million budget back in 1999. Will Smith starred »

- MovieWeb

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'Independence Day', 'Shallows' & 'Free State of Jones' Must Contend with 'Finding Dory'

23 June 2016 10:32 AM, PDT | Box Office Mojo | See recent BoxOfficeMojo.com news »

Summer 2016 is heating up after last week's massive opening for Disney and Pixar's Finding Dory and its impressive day-to-day performance ever since. Hoping to add some fuel to the box office fire, this weekend's crop of new releases are led by Independence Day: Resurgence, the sequel to the blockbuster hit of Summer 1996. Also opening this weekend, Stx will target adult audiences with Free State of Jones, Blake Lively must survive a killer shark in The Shallows and Broad Green is delivering Nicolas Winding Refn's The Neon Demon into just over 780 theaters. It's a crowded marketplace with a little something for everybody. Quelling some of the suspense, the battle for box office supremacy this weekend might not be much of a battle at all. Pixar's forgetful fish should handily take down the alien invaders as Finding Dory is looking at a $70+ million second weekend while Fox's Independence Day sequel carries a big budget, »

- Brad Brevet <mail@boxofficemojo.com>

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Gwyneth Paltrow Opens Up About Remaining 'A Family' with Ex Chris Martin - and Supports Him at Cannes Concert

22 June 2016 8:50 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin may have famously agreed to "consciously uncouple" back in 2014, but that hasn't stopped the pair from remaining close - or showing their support for each other. The 43-year-old actress opened up about her divorce on Wednesday while chatting with Stephen Sackur, host of the BBC News program HardTalk, at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity in France, where she even attended a concert by the Coldplay frontman. According to the New York Post's Page Six, Paltrow said her split from Martin, 39 was "difficult" - though she's happy they've found a way to co-parent amicably. »

- Dave Quinn, @NineDaves

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Gwyneth Paltrow Opens Up About Remaining 'A Family' with Ex Chris Martin - and Supports Him at Cannes Concert

22 June 2016 8:50 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin may have famously agreed to "consciously uncouple" back in 2014, but that hasn't stopped the pair from remaining close - or showing their support for each other. The 43-year-old actress opened up about her divorce on Wednesday while chatting with Stephen Sackur, host of the BBC News program HardTalk, at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity in France, where she even attended a concert by the Coldplay frontman. According to the New York Post's Page Six, Paltrow said her split from Martin, 39 was "difficult" - though she's happy they've found a way to co-parent amicably. »

- Dave Quinn, @NineDaves

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‘Nine Lives’ Clip: Christopher Walken is Your Friendly Neighborhood Cat Whisperer

18 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Barry Sonnenfeld has made some fine entertainment over the course of his career. In the 1990s, Sonnenfeld had a terrific run, directing Get ShortyMen in Black, and The Addams Family movies. Before turning towards directing, as a cinematographer, he shot Raising Arizona, Miller’s Crossing, Big, Misery, and Throw Momma from the Train. Since working on all of those memorable films, he’s directed some pictures–Wild […]

The post ‘Nine Lives’ Clip: Christopher Walken is Your Friendly Neighborhood Cat Whisperer appeared first on /Film. »

- Jack Giroux

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Poll: What’s the Best Alien Invasion Movie?

14 June 2016 11:46 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

If there’s one thing that’s always fascinated mankind, it’s space, and just what could be “out there” — and what aliens might want from us.

That fascination has spurred countless alien invasion movies, including “Independence Day,” which sees its sequel, “Independence Day: Resurgence” debuting June 24. It’s only one of the extraterrestrials v. humans movies to hit theaters over the years.

What’s your favorite movie depicting aliens making their way to Earth? Did you appreciate “Men in Black’s” (which, like “Independence Day,” included Will Smith) light-hearted touch, or appreciate M. Night Shyamalan’s spooky spin with “Signs”? Note that every alien movie isn’t necessary an “alien Earth invasion” movie, hence why a classic like Ridley Scott’s “Alien” didn’t make the poll.

Weigh in below. Of course, we couldn’t fit every alien invasion movie below, so if there’s one we missed, let us know in the comments below.

»

- Variety Staff

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Match the poster to the summer blockbuster – quiz

14 June 2016 6:01 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The silly season is underway with aliens invading, superheroes saving and orcs doing whatever they’re doing in Warcraft. But can you match the zoomed in movie poster to the summer blockbuster of years past?

The Matrix Reloaded

Batman Forever

Jaws II

Blade Runner

X-Men: First Class

Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Prometheus

The Avengers

Ghostbusters

Poltergeist

Batman & Robin

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen

Speed

Top Gun

Minority Report

I, Robot

The Rock

Spider-Man 2

Men In Black

Die Hard with a Vengeance

Iron Man

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

X-Men

The Bourne Ultimatum

Armageddon

Fantastic Four

Tomorrowland

Transformers

The Empire Strikes Back

Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Gremlins

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

Superman III

The Goonies

Return of the Jedi

A View to a Kill

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Snow White and the Huntsman

Alice Through the Looking Glass

Lilo & Stitch

7 and above.

You're a cinematic universe!

4 and above.

You're the sequel no one wanted

0 and above.

You're not getting a sequel

Continue reading »

- Benjamin Lee

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Warner Bros, and its disastrous movie summer of 1997

13 June 2016 2:21 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Warner Bros has struggled with its blockbusters of late. But back in summer 1997 - Batman & Robin's year - it faced not dissimilar problems.

Earlier this year it was revealed that Warner Bros, following a string of costly movies that hadn’t hit box office gold (Pan, Jupiter Ascending, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., In The Heart Of The Sea), was restructuring its blockbuster movie business. Fewer films, fewer risks, more franchises, and more centering around movie universes seems to be the new approach, and the appointment of a new corporate team to oversee the Harry Potter franchise last week was one part of that.

In some ways, it marks the end of an era. Whilst it retains its relationships with key directing talent (Ben Affleck, Clint Eastwood, Christopher Nolan for instance), Warner Bros was, for the bulk of the 1990s in particular, the studio that the others were trying to mimic. It worked with the same stars and filmmakers time and time again, and under then-chiefs Terry Semel and Robert Daly, relationships with key talent were paramount.

Furthermore, the studio knew to leave that talent to do its job, and was also ahead of the pack in developing franchises that it could rely on to give it a string of hits.

However, whilst Warner Bros is having troubles now, its way of doing business was first seriously challenged by the failure of its slate in the summer of 1997. Once again, it seemed to have a line up to cherish, that others were envious of. But as film by film failed to click, every facet of Warner Bros’ blockbuster strategy suddenly came under scrutiny, and would ultimately fairly dramatically change. Just two summers later, the studio released The Matrix, and blockbuster cinema changed again.

But come the start of summer 1997? These are the movies that Warner Bros had lined up, and this is what happened…

February - National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation

Things actually had got off to a decent enough start for the studio earlier in the year, so it's worth kicking off there. It brought Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo back together, for the fourth National Lampoon movie, and the first since 1989’s National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. Interestingly, it dropped the National Lampoon moniker in the Us, and instead released the eventual movie as Vegas Vacation. It was a belated sequel, back when belated sequels weren’t that big a thing.

The film was quickly pulled apart by reviewers, but it still just about clawed a profit. The production budget of $25m was eclipsed by the Us gross of $36m, and the movie would do comfortable business on video/DVD. Not a massive hit, then, but hardly a project that had a sense of foreboding about it.

Yet the problems were not far away.

May – Father's Day

Warner Bros had a mix of movies released in the Us in March and April 1997, including modest Wesley Snipes-headlined thriller Murder At 1600, and family flick Shiloh. But it launched its summer season with Father’s Day, an expensive packaged comedy from director Ivan Reitman, starring Robin Williams and Billy Crystal. It had hit written all over it.

Father’s Day was one of the movies packaged by the CAA agency, and its then-head, Mike Ovitz (listed regularly by Premiere magazine in the 1990s as one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, if not the most powerful man). That he brought together the stars, the director and the project, gave a studio a price tag, and the studio duly paid it. Given Warner Bros’ devotion to star talent (Mel Gibson, then one of the biggest movie stars in the world, and a major Warner Bros talent, was persuaded to film a cameo), it was a natural home for the film. It quickly did the deal. few questions asked.

That package, and CAA’s fees for putting it together, brought the budget for a fairly straightforward comedy to a then-staggering $85m. The problem, though, was that the film simply wasn’t very good. It’s one of those projects that looks great on paper, less great when exposed on a great big screen. Warner Bros has snapped it up, without - it seems - even properly reading the script. 

Premiere magazine quoted a Warner Bros insider back in November 1997 as saying “when [CAA] calls and says ‘we have a package, Father’s Day, with Williams and Crystal and Reitman, we say ‘great’”, adding “we don’t scrutinise the production. When we saw the movie, it took the wind out of us. We kept reshooting and enhancing, but you can’t fix something that’s bad”.

And it was bad.

The movie would prove to be the first big misfire of the summer, grossing just $35m in the Us, and not adding a fat lot more elsewhere in the world. Warner Bros’ first film of the summer was a certified flop. More would soon follow.

May - Addicted To Love

A more modestly priced project was Addicted To Love, a romantic comedy starring Meg Ryan and Matthew Broderick. Just over a year later, Warner Bros would hit big when Meg Ryan reunited with Tom Hanks for Nora Ephron’s You’ve Got Mail. But here? The film was a modest success, at best.

Directed by Griffin Dunne (making his directorial debut), and put together in partnership with Miramax, Addicted To Love was based around the Robert Palmer song of the same name. But whilst it was sold as a romcom, the muddled final cut was actually a fair bit darker. There was an underlying nastiness to some moments in the film, and when the final box office was tallied, it came in lower than the usual returns for pictures from Ryan or Broderick. Counter-programming it against the release of The Lost World: Jurassic Park didn’t massively help in this instance either, especially as the Jurassic Park sequel would smash opening weekend records.

Addicted To Love ended up with $34.6m at the Us box office. It would eke out a small profit.

June - Batman & Robin

And this is when the alarm bells started to ring very, very loudly. Summer 1997 was supposed to be about a trio of sure-fire hit sequels: Batman 4, Jurassic Park 2 and Speed 2. Only one of those would ultimately bring home the box office bacon, the others being destroyed by critics, and ultimately leaving far more empty seats than anticipated in multiplexes.

Batman & Robin, it’s easy to forget, came off the back of 1995’s Joel Schumacher-steered Batman reboot, Batman Forever that year's biggest movie). It had one of the fastest-growing stars in the world in the Batsuit (George Clooney), and the McDonald’s deals were signed even before the script was typed up. You don’t need us to tell you that you could tell, something of a theme already in Warner Bros' summer of '97.

That said, Batman & Robin still gave Warner Bros a big opening, but in the infancy of the internet as we know it, poisonous word of mouth was already beginning to spread. The film’s negative cost Warner Bros up to $140m, before marketing and distribution costs, and it opened in the Us to a hardly-sniffy $42m of business (although that was down from previous Batman movies).

But that word of mouth still accelerated its departure from cinemas. It was then very rare for a film to make over 40% of its Us gross in its first weekend. But that’s just what Batman & Robin did, taking $107.3m in America, part of a worldwide total of $238.2m. This was the worst return for a Batman movie to date, and Warner Bros had to swiftly put the brakes on plans to get Batman Triumphant moving.

It would be eight years until Batman returned to the big screen, in Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins. Warner Bros would undergo big changes in the intervening period.

As for the immediate aftermath of Batman & Robin? Warner Bros co-chief Robert Daly would note at the end of '97 that “we’d have been better off with more action in the picture. The movie had to service too many characters”, adding that “the next Batman we do, in three years – and we have a deal with George Clooney to do it – will have one villain”.

Fortunately, Warner Bros’ one solid hit of the summer was just around the corner…

July - Contact

And breathe out.

Warner Bros bet heavily again on expensive talent here, with Robert Zemeckis bringing his adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Contact to the studio for his first film post-Forrest Gump. Warner Bros duly footed the $90m bill (back when that was still seen as a lot of money for a movie), a good chunk of which went to Jodie Foster. It invested heavily in special effects, and gave Zemeckis licence to make the film that he wanted.

The studio was rewarded with the most intelligent and arguably the best blockbuster of the summer. I’ve looked back at Contact in a lot more detail here, and it remains a fascinating film that’s stood the test of time (and arguably influenced Christopher Nolan’s more recent Interstellar).

Reviews were strong, it looked terrific, and the initial box office was good.

But then the problem hit. For whilst Contact was a solid hit for Warner Bros, it wasn’t a massively profitable one. Had Father’s Day and Batman & Robin shouldered the box office load there were supposed to, it perhaps wouldn’t have been a problem. But when they failed to take off, the pressure shifted to Contact.

The movie would gross $100.9m in the Us, and add another $70m overseas (this being an era were international box office rarely had the importance it has today). But once Warner Bros had paid its bills, there wasn’t a fat lot over for itself. Fortunately, the film still sells on disc and on-demand. Yet it wasn’t to be the massive hit the studio needed back in 1997.

July - One Eight Seven

From director Kevin Reynolds, the man who helmed Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves and Waterworld, came modestly-priced drama 187, starring Samuel L Jackson (in a strong performance). Warner Bros wouldn’t have had massive box office expectations for the film (although it can't have been unaware that the inspirational teacher sub-genre was always worth a few quid), and it shared production duties on the $20m movie with Mel Gibson’s Icon Productions. But still, it would have had its eye on a modest success. What it got in return was red ink.

The film’s not a bad one, and certainly worth seeking out. But poor reviews gave the film an uphill struggle from the off – smaller productions arriving mid-summer really needed critics on their side, as they arguably still do – and it opened to just $2.2m of business (the less edgy, Michelle Pfeiffer-headlined school drama Dangerous Minds had been a surprise hit not two years before).

By the time its run was done, 187 hadn’t even come close to covering its production costs, with just under $6m banked.

Warner Bros’ summer slate was running out of films. But at least it had one of its most reliable movie stars around the corner…

August - Conspiracy Theory

What could go wrong? Mel Gibson and Julia Roberts were two of the biggest movie stars in the world in 1997, at a time when movie stars still equated to box office gold. Director Richard Donner, one of Warner Bros’ favourite directors, had delivered the Lethal Weapons, Maverick, Superman, The Goonies and more for the studio. Put them altogether, with Patrick Stewart (coming to wider public consciousness at the time off the back of his Star Trek: The Next Generation work) as a villain, and it should have been a big hit.

Conspiracy Theory proved to be one of the more ambitious summer blockbusters of the era. It lacks a good first act, which would be really useful in actually setting up more of what’s going on. But Gibson played an edgy cab driver who believes in deep government conspiracies, and finds himself getting closer to the truth than those around him sometimes give him credit for.

Warner Bros was probably expecting another Lethal Weapon with the reunion of Gibson (who had to be persuaded to take Conspiracy Theory on) and Donner (it’s pretty much what it got with the hugely enjoyable Maverick a few years’ earlier), but instead it got a darker drama, with an uneasy central character that didn’t exactly play to the summer box office crowd.

The bigger problem, though, was that the film never quite worked as well as you might hope. Yet star power did have advantages. While no juggernaut, the film did decent business, grossing $137m worldwide off the back of an $80m budget ($40m of which was spent on the salaries for the talent before a single roll of film was loaded into a camera). That said, in the Us it knocked a genuine smash hit, Air Force One, off the top spot. Mind you in hindsight, that was probably the film that the studio wished it had made (the cockpit set of Warner Bros' own Executive Decision was repurposed for Air Force One, fact fans).

Still: Warner Bros did get Lethal Weapon 4 off Gibson and Donner a year later…

August - Free Willy 3: The Rescue

Yeah.

Warner Bros opened its third Free Willy film on the same day as Conspiracy Theory (can you imagine a studio opening two big films on the same day now), but it was clear that this was a franchise long past its best days (and its best days hardly bring back the fondest of memories).

Still, Free Willy movies were relatively modest in cost to put together, and Warner Bros presumably felt this was a simple cashpoint project. But in a year when lots of family movies did less business than expected (Disney’s Hercules, Fox’s Home Alone 3, Disney’s Mr Magoo), Free Willy 3 barely troubled the box office. It took in just over $3m in total, and Willy would not be seen on the inside of a cinema again.

August - Steel

Not much was expected from Steel, a superhero movie headlined by Shaquille O’Neal. Which was fortunate, because not much was had.

It had a mid-August release date in the Us, at a point when a mid-August release date was more of a dumping ground than anything else. And even though the budget was set at a relatively low $16m, the film – and it’s an overused time – pretty much bombed. It took $1.7m at the Us box office, and given that its appeal hinged on a major American sports star whose fame hardly transcended the globe, its international takings did not save it (it went straight to video in many territories).

It was a miserable end to what, for warner bros, had been a thoroughly miserable summer.

So what did hit big in summer 1997?

Summer 1997 was infamous for big films failing to take off in the way that had been expected – Hercules, Speed 2, and the aforementioned Warner Bros movies – but there were several bright spots. The big winner would be Barry Sonnenfeld’s light and sprightly sci-fi comedy Men In Black, starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. Star power too helped score big hits for Harrison Ford (Air Force One), Julia Roberts (My Best Friend’s Wedding) and John Travolta (Face/Off).

This was also the summer that Nicolas Cage cemented his action movie credentials with Face/Off and Con Air. Crucially, though, the star movies that hit were the ones that veered on the side of 'good'. For the first of many years, the internet was blamed for this.

Oh, and later in the year, incidentally, Titanic would redefine just what constituted a box office hit...

What came next for Warner Bros?

In the rest of 1997, Warner Bros had a mix of projects that again enjoyed mixed fortunes. The standout was Curtis Hanson’s stunning adaptation of L.A. Confidential, that also proved to be a surprise box office success. The Devil’s Advocate didn’t do too badly either.

However, two of the studio’s key filmmakers failed to really deliver come the end of 1997. Clint Eastwood’s Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil failed to ignite (although many felt he was always on a hiding to nothing in trying to adapt that for the screen), and Kevin Costner’s The Postman would prove arguably the most expensive box office disappointment of the year. No wonder the studio rushed Lethal Weapon 4 into production for summer 1998. Oh, and it had The Avengers underway too (not that one), that would prove to be a 1998 disappointment.

The studio would eventually take action. The Daly-Semel management team, that had reigned for 15 years, would break up at the end of 1999, as its traditional way of doing business became less successful. The pair had already future projects that were director driven to an extent (Eyes Wide Shut), and it would still invest in movies with stars (Wild Wild West). But the immediate plan of action following the disappointment of summer 1997 – to get Batman 5 and Superman Lives made – would falter. It wouldn’t be until 1999’s The Matrix (a film that Daly and Semel struggled to get) and – crucially – 2001’s Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stone that the studio would really get its swagger back...

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Movies Feature Simon Brew Warner Bros 16 Jun 2016 - 05:19 Conspiracy Theory Father's Day Addicted To Love Contact National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation One Eight Seven Steel Batman & Robin Free Willy 3: The Rescue »

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Concept art for the failed Jurassic Park 4 features human-dinosaurs with guns

10 June 2016 5:18 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Back in 2001, it was reported that Steven Spielberg and Joe Johnston (who had directed Jurassic Park III) were working on ideas for a fourth movie in the series. Some rumours had it that Sam Neill and Jeff Goldbum were set to return as Alan Grant and Ian Malcolm, and would see them lead an expedition team on another island. Keira Knightly was also signed on at one point, but she was written out in later drafts.

Eventually in 2007, Aint It Cool news wrote a review of a leaked script they got their hands on, which surrounded the idea that InGen were now mixing the DNA or humans, raptors and dogs to create human-dino hybrids. Yep. And they had guns too.

As we all now know, Jurassic Park IV was scrapped and replaced with last year’s mega blockbuster Jurassic World. However artist Carlos Huante (Men in Black) has shared some »

- Luke Owen

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‘Ali’ Director Michael Mann on the Greatest, the Man Behind the Movie (Guest Column)

8 June 2016 10:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

One of Muhammad Ali’s biggest struggles culminated in 1974’s Rumble in the Jungle, where it seemed that the spirit of the progressive forces in the world was about to battle the spirit of the repressive status quo.

Early on, Cassius Clay related to the wider world. His father was interested in Marcus Garvey and pan-Africanism. Cassius started reading “Muhammad Speaks” in 1959. In the early ‘60s, the front page may have featured the opening of a Nation of Islam haberdashery on 64th Street in Chicago, but buried in the middle pages were national liberation struggles in the third world, Patrice Lumumba in the Congo, gleaming new public housing in Nkrumah’s Ghana.

Then, when he became world champion and changed his religion and declared himself free of every Jim Crow assumption and expectation including his slave name (“I had to prove you could be a new kind of black man. »

- Michael Mann

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Don’t Hold Your Breath For A Transformers/Tmnt Crossover Movie

3 June 2016 9:13 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

At some point before the year’s end, James Bobin will officially jump-start production on Mib 23, the event film that brings together the worlds of Men in Black and Jump Street series for one big crossover bonanza.

That’s in the works over at Sony, but the studio’s decision to fuse one series with the next has proven infectious, with fans dreaming up scenarios in which the worlds of their favorite movie franchises collide.

More News From The Web

Two properties that won’t be undergoing the crossover treatment, however, are Transformers and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, after Paramount’s Brad Fuller confirmed the studio has no plans to introduce Optimus Prime and Co. to the half-shell heroes. For now, at least.

Speaking with Screen Rant in anticipation of Out of the Shadows, Fuller noted that the franchises, which have a common denominator in producer Michael Bay, won »

- Michael Briers

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Thank Goodness, There Are No Plans To Crossover ‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’ And ‘Transformers’

3 June 2016 6:09 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

In an era when we’re going to get a “22 Jump Street“/”Men In Black” crossover movie, it’s good to know that studio executives aren’t just mashing up everything they possibly can (and as we recently detailed, chasing IP entertainment may not be a sustainable model). And thus, while this weekend’s “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out Of […]

The post Thank Goodness, There Are No Plans To Crossover ‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’ And ‘Transformers’ appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of Now You See Me 2 In St. Louis

31 May 2016 9:27 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The master magicians known as the Four Horsemen return for their most daring and astounding caper ever, elevating the limits of stage illusion to new heights in hopes of clearing their names and exposing the ruthlessness of a dangerous tech magnate.

One year after their astonishing Robin Hood-style magic shows win the public’s adulation and confound the FBI, the quartet resurfaces for a dazzling comeback performance that will make their previous escapades seem like child’s play. With the help of FBI Special Agent Dylan Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), the Horsemen — J. Daniel Atlas (Jesse Eisenberg), Merritt McKinney (Woody Harrelson), Jack Wilder (Dave Franco) and new addition Lula (Lizzy Caplan) — mount a meticulously planned surprise appearance, in hopes of exposing corrupt tech tycoon Owen Case (Ben Lamb).

But their scheme backfires, exposing Dylan’s involvement with the Horsemen and sending all five of them back on the run. To regain »

- Movie Geeks

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The British TV Show Invasion: 7 Reasons You Should Watch 'Doctor Who' Now

27 May 2016 12:19 PM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

"Doctor Who" is one of the longest-running franchises in all of space and time -- it's been on TV, radio, and bookshelves for more than 50 years, so there's a lot to dig into. With such a long history, you can join in on the fun anywhere, anytime. Here are the best reasons to join the Doctor in his time machine/spaceship, the Tardis, for adventures throughout the space-time continuum.

1. You Can Start Anywhere

Every fan has an opinion about the best place to start watching "Doctor Who." Some argue for beginning with the 1964 black-and-white series, and others advocate for jumping in with the more modern 2005 version of the franchise -- affectionately known as "Nu Who." Although "Doctor Who" is full of canonical rules, backstories, and in-jokes, most episodes are intended as standalone stories about the Doctor and his companions running into adventures throughout space and time. Really: You can pick »

- Jaime Vazquez

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Director James Bobin Teases ‘Mib 23’

25 May 2016 9:36 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

Hollywood has a lot of dumb ideas out there. Let’s face it. In the eternal search for a recognizable brand to exploit, they’re often willing to take some pretty silly risks. All that being said, there is a particular idea that fans seem particularly harsh on that I actually adore, and that’s the idea to cross over the 21 Jump Street franchise with the Men In Black franchise.

The crossover has been rumored to be named Mib 23, which is a pretty great name when all said and done, but apart from that potential title, the details have been sparse.

Rumored to be attached to the film as director is Alice Through The Looking Glass director Jame Bobin, who is currently going through a round of press tours for the film. In an interview with Collider, the outlet brought up that he was rumored to be taking on Mib »

- Joseph Medina

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James Bobin Teases “Awesome” Script For Mib 23, Shooting To Commence Later This Year

25 May 2016 9:35 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

First outed during Sony’s calamitous hacking scandal of 2014, that Men in Black/Jump Street movie is on the verge of becoming a reality, having appointed director James Bobin at the helm and nabbed an official title in Mib 23.

Currently doing the press rounds for Alice Through the Looking Glass, Bobin was quizzed about the franchise crossover while speaking with Collider. Considering that Mib 23 is without a firm release date, we’ve only caught fleeting teases of what to expect from Sony’s event film up until now, but Bobin did hint that Jenko and Schmidt – the two sons of bitches that they are – could be going to the Men in Black headquarters before the year’s end.

Bobin began by dancing around specifics, noting that Mib 23 stands as the “working title” for the time being, before addressing the critics that have called the core concept into question. »

- Michael Briers

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