Love and Death on Long Island (1997) - News Poster

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A Look Back at John Hurt’s Greatest Film Roles

A Look Back at John Hurt’s Greatest Film Roles
No actor was more perfectly named than John Hurt. It’s not as if the characters he played were always in pain, though more often than not, they were. Yet he was graced with a seductively layered and tricky personality — you sensed that his characters were sly, furtive, and complicated, because he was all those things as well.

Hurt died, at age 77, of pancreatic cancer Jan. 27 at his home in Norfolk, England. These are my favorites of his films.

The Naked Civil Servant

The performance that put Hurt on the map was his channeling of Quentin Crisp in a 1975 British TV movie. Cloaked in white makeup, with a shock of orange hair and a bombs-away bitchery as unapologetic as Johnny Rotten’s sneer, Hurt’s Crisp is effete , delicate, and merciless. The beauty of the performance is that it’s not a plea for “tolerance” so much as for the insane glory of the individual.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A Tribute to John Hurt: A Playful Master Who Made His Inner Hurt Ours

A Tribute to John Hurt: A Playful Master Who Made His Inner Hurt Ours
No actor was more perfectly named than John Hurt. It’s not as if the people he played were always in pain (though more often than not, they were). Yet he was graced with a seductively layered and tricky personality — you sensed that his characters were sly, furtive, and complicated because Hurt, who died Jan. 27 in England, was all those things as well. And the deepest layer was the hint of torment he carried around with him. It was like the speck of sand around which a pearl forms.

Hurt was born in 1940, but he was never some impeccable boring well-mannered “Masterpiece Theatre” thespian. Over and over, he gave performances that were daring and surprising and outrageous. Comb through his credits, and it’s hard to find anything that approaches the safe, bland note of costume-drama respectability. And yet, when you think of John Hurt, the first thing you probably
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Doctor Cast in Guillermo Del Toro Vampire FX Pilot The Strain

The Doctor! Guillermo del Toro! Vampire pilot for FX! Who Wouldn’T be all over this story? We’ve actually already told you a little about the del Toro vampire pilot The Strain, based on the trilogy of books he co-authored with Chuck Hogan (Prince of Thieves). If picked up, the showrunner would be our beloved Carlton Cuse (Lost, Bates Motel).

So, as the headline blares, the newest cast member is (one of) the Doctor(s). This particular Doctor is the newest to us, though I suspect he’s one of the oldest. It’s John Hurt, reuniting with his Hellboy director del Toro. Hurt’s castmates in include Corey Stoll (The Bourne Legacy, Midnight in Paris), Mia Maestro (Nadia in Alias) and Kevin Durand (Keamy in Lost). Here’s the press release, which includes a synopsis of the show:

FX Casts Oscar(R)-Nominated Actor John Hurt In “The Strain
See full article at ScifiMafia »

John Hurt infected with 'The Strain,' joins Guillermo del Toro's FX pilot

FX has nabbed itself an Oscar-nominated acting legend for its high-profile Guillermo del Toro pilot, "The Strain."

Joining a previously announced cast that includes Corey Stoll, Kevin Durand and Mia Maestro, John Hurt will portray Professor Abraham Setrakian in the pilot, based on the best-selling vampire novel trilogy by del Toro and Chuck Hogan. The professor is described as a holocaust survivor who immigrated to the U.S. after World War II and now runs a pawn shop in Spanish Harlem. As a mysterious viral outbreak with hallmarks of an ancient and evil strain of vampirism spreads, he may be the only one with answers -- if anyone will listen.

Stoll stars as Dr. Ephraim Goodweather, the head of the Center for Disease Control Canary Team in NYC. As the plague takes over the city, Eph, Abraham and a motley crew of everyday New Yorkers (including Maestro as Dr. Nora
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Take Three: John Hurt

Craig here with the third season of Take Three. Today: John Hurt

Take One: Brighton Rock (2010)

Hurt has alternated starring roles with supporting performances since he began acting in films with The Wild and the Willing in 1962. The amount of quality supporting turns he’s delivered over the years is vast: 10 Rillington Place, Midnight Express, The Shout, The Hit, Scandal, The Field, Contact, The Proposition, Melancholia, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy are a mere few. His fine turn as accountant Phil Corkery in the Brighton Rock remake (backing up Helen Mirren, Sam Riley, Andrea Riseborough and Andy Serkis) is a recent solid addition to the list and deserves due credit. Phil’s a gaunt shambles, but loyal to Mirren’s Ida, his long-time crush. He’s one of the old guard. A proud man accustomed to propping up bars whilst waxing forth about the state of the world. He’s the
See full article at FilmExperience »

Gilbert Adair, 1944 - 2011

  • MUBI
"Gilbert Adair, the acclaimed critic who had some of his own novels turned into successful films, has died aged 66," reports Catherine Shoard in the Guardian. "Adair won the respect of cineastes with volumes such as A Night at the Pictures (1985), Myths & Memories (1986), Hollywood's Vietnam (1981), Flickers (1995), Surfing the Zeitgeist (1997) and with his translation of the letters of François Truffaut (published in 1990). He was a prolific journalist, writing a regular column for the Sunday Times in the 1990s, as well as for this paper — last year he interviewed the French filmmaker Alain Resnais."

As a screenwriter, Adair will be remembered for his collaborations with Raúl Ruiz (The Territory in 1981, Klimt in 2006, Blind Revenge in 2010) and Bernardo Bertolucci (The Dreamers in 2003, based on his own novel, The Holy Innocents). Richard Kwietniowski's Love and Death on Long Island (1997) is based on Adair's novel.

In January 2010, Adair wrote in the Guardian, "I yield to
See full article at MUBI »

Gilbert Adair obituary

Witty, self-deprecating writer with a passion for cinema whose work shone 'like sparklers in the autumn gloom'

In Gilbert Adair's And Then There Was No One (2009), the third of his pastiches of Agatha Christie's detective stories, a writer called Gilbert Adair is lacerated thus by a reader: "The point, Gilbert, is that you've always been such a narcissistic writer. Which is why you've never had the popular touch … Postmodernism is dead … Nobody gives two hoots about self-referentiality any longer, just as nobody gives two hoots, or even a single hoot, about you. Your books are out of sight, out of sound, out of fashion and out of print."

Such self-referential gambits have exasperated some readers, but in Adair's staunchly postmodern, self-deprecating hands, the manoeuvre was disarming. Adair, who has died aged 66 of a brain haemorrhage, had often enjoyed playfully rehearsing his own literary erasure. In the 1990s he
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gilbert Adair: cinema's man of letters

In another era, Gilbert Adair would have written on Herodotus. As it was he focused his energies on an exciting young medium

Gilbert Adair was a unique and wonderful writer: a critic of elegance, brilliance, and unquenchable intellectual energy and curiosity. He combined the roles of cinephile and man of letters in a unique way, as well being a novelist, screenwriter, translator and pasticheur. His final works were a series of detective story spoofs, satirical and wittily observed variants on Agatha Christie entitled The Act of Roger Murgatroyd, A Mysterious Affair of Style and And Then There Was No One. These contrivances were treasured and eagerly awaited by his fans, and they demonstrated both a storyteller's gusto and a theorist's interest in narrator reliability and point of view. His 1992 novel The Death of the Author, a droll twist on Roland Barthes, is another example.

I personally met Adair just a
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gilbert Adair, acclaimed film critic and novelist, dies aged 66

Prolific journalist and author whose novels were often adapted for the big screen, has died

Gilbert Adair, the acclaimed critic who had some of his own novels turned into successful films, has died aged 66.

Adair won the respect of cineastes with volumes such as A Night at the Pictures (1985), Myths & Memories (1986), Hollywood's Vietnam (1981), Flickers (1995), Surfing the Zeitgeist (1997) and with his translation of the letters of François Truffaut (published in 1990). He was a prolific journalist, writing a regular column for the Sunday Times in the 1990s, as well as for this paper – last year he interviewed the French film-maker Alain Resnais.

It was in cinematic adaptation that he found wider fame: the 1997 film Love and Death on Long Island, starring John Hurt as mordant writer Giles De'Ath, and Jason Priestley as the teen star he strikes up a friendship with, was based on Adair's 1990 novel of the same name.

Bernardo Bertolucci's successful 2003 film The Dreamers,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Maury Chaykin obituary

Actor who was at his best in shadowy roles

The actor Maury Chaykin, who has died aged 61 after a heart-valve infection, was an American and a Canadian citizen, and his career reflected his dual nationality. In the Us, he was a familiar face, if not a recognisable name, playing small but telling roles in major films. His breakthrough came in Dances With Wolves (1990), playing Major Fambrough, who sends Kevin Costner on his frontier assignment and then kills himself. Chaykin's only leading role was in the cable TV series A Nero Wolfe Mystery (2001), as the titular detective who refuses to leave his house, delegating that to his assistant (Timothy Hutton).

In Canada, Chaykin was something of a national treasure. He won a Genie award for best actor for his performance as a Brian Wilson-like burned-out rock star in Whale Music (1994), gave remarkable performances in three films directed by Atom Egoyan
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The second outing of John Hurt

He got his big break playing Quentin Crisp in The Naked Civil Servant and now, 34 years later, John Hurt is at it again

There's something disturbing about John Hurt. That familiar Mount Rushmore face seems to have ironed itself out. It was once compared to a komodo dragon – even his lines seemed to have lines – but today he looks peachy as a schoolboy. You've been on the Botox, haven't you? He roars with how-dare-you laughter. "Nah! Hahahaha! No. Don't say that. That would be awful. Not in a million years would I do that." He's got a point: take away the cracks and creases, and his job prospects would diminish no end. His face is one of the most distinctive in the movies. Almost as distinctive as his voice, dripping with honey and acid, often at the same time. Look, he admits, there might well be a reason for his
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The second outing of John Hurt

He got his big break playing Quentin Crisp in The Naked Civil Servant and now, 34 years later, John Hurt is at it again

There's something disturbing about John Hurt. That familiar Mount Rushmore face seems to have ironed itself out. It was once compared to a komodo dragon – even his lines seemed to have lines – but today he looks peachy as a schoolboy. You've been on the Botox, haven't you? He roars with how-dare-you laughter. "Nah! Hahahaha! No. Don't say that. That would be awful. Not in a million years would I do that." He's got a point: take away the cracks and creases, and his job prospects would diminish no end. His face is one of the most distinctive in the movies. Almost as distinctive as his voice, dripping with honey and acid, often at the same time. Look, he admits, there might well be a reason for his
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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