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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 38 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


20 Years Back: Celebrating the Cinematic Delights of 1997

12 August 2017 12:34 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tom Jolliffe celebrates the cinematic delights of 1997…

1997. It doesn’t feel that distant but we’re now talking 20 years. This was the year I left school. That officially makes me old as fuck I believe. Lady Di passed, Tony Blair became Pm, Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule, Mike Tyson had a Holyfield Ear pie and more. The Spice Girls reigned supreme. Hanson were Mmmbopping all over the place and confusing horny teenagers who thought the girl singing lead was hot.

In film, the year is significant. This was the year the Titanic did the opposite of sink (erm… float). James Cameron’s historical (which icebergs aside wasn’t that historical) epic was seen by pretty much everyone on Earth. It probably grossed a further Trillion Wibblewangs outside the Milky Way (I just invented an alien currency). It thundered away as the highest grossing film ever (if you don’t »

- Gary Collinson

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Disney Is Desperate And Netflix Is Going To Eat Their Lunch -- The Lrm Weekend

11 August 2017 4:45 PM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

  By David Kozlowski   |   11 August 2017

Welcome to Issue #8 of The Lrm Weekend, a weekly column offering strong opinions about film, TV, comics, Star Wars, Marvel, DC, animation, and anime. We also want to hear from you, our awesome Lrm community! Share your feedback or ideas for future columns: @LRM_Weekend and we'll post your Tweets below!

Previous Issues: 8.4.17 | 7.28.17 | 7.21.17 | 7.14.17 | 7.7.17 | 6.30.17

Hey Lrm Weekenders, we've got a bunch of cool stuff for you this week. In our editorial we'll examine the big Disney streaming service announcement and what it means for Netflix. We'll also dive into the career of master crime writer Elmore Leonard, assess Chuck Norris' fighting skills, and have some fun with 80s Action movies. Looking forward to your comments and feedback!

Netflix Is Poised To Dominate And It's All Disney's Fault

Disney's big announcement, to pull their films from Netflix and launch their own streaming service by 2019, might look like »

- David Kozlowski

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Great Films Unfairly Forgotten in Time

6 August 2017 4:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tom Jolliffe on forgotten films…

Time is a cruel mistress. It’s the one constant and something no one can alter (except Marty McFly and Doc Brown). Looks go, memories fade and in cinematic terms a film can be forgotten over time. Now sometimes it’s probably a good thing. Take for example the turn of the century and the release of Battlefield Earth. One of the undisputed turkeys of modern cinema. An unmitigated disaster on every level. However it’s not one that always springs directly to mind nowadays when people thing of cinematic disasters. In part there’s been even worse since, and on even more bloated budgets. In that respect, time has been a little kind.

However there are a lot of films which were good, great, maybe on occasion cinematically important which have become hazy memories over time. Perhaps they never quite got the recognition or »

- Gary Collinson

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The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in August 2017

3 August 2017 9:39 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Dozens of movies are hitting Netflix during the dog days of summer (click here for a complete list), but the sheer variety of new titles can be daunting. Movies are long, time is short, and indecision is brutal, so — in the hopes of helping you out — here are the seven best films that are coming to Netflix in August.

7. “Practical Magic” (1998)

Okay, so “Practical Magic” isn’t a “good movie” in the traditional sense…or in any other sense, for that matter. But it’s a perfect Netflix movie, which is another beast entirely. An incredible time capsule — and bottomless gif resource — from an ancient epoch that historians refer to as “1998,” this essential relic tells the story of sisters Sally (Sandra Bullock) and Gillian (Nicole Kidman) Owens, twin witches who are effectively cursed to remain single forever.

Did I mention that it was directed by Griffin Dunne? Did I mention that it was nominated for a Blockbuster Entertainment Award for including a Faith Hill song on the soundtrack? Did I mention that it features a scene in which Dianne Wiest and Stockard Channing use their secret powers to blend alcoholic drinks in order to lubricate a singalong set to Harry Nilsson’s “Put the Lime in the Coconut”? “Practical Magic” was kind of a blip when it first opened, but it would shake our culture to its skeleton if it came out today. A remake feels inevitable, but in the meantime, the original makes for perfect streaming on a lazy August afternoon. Better yet, add it to your queue and swing back once Halloween rolls around.

Begins streaming August 1st.

6. “The Bomb” (2016)

“the bomb” was one of the most exciting, unclassifiable experiences on the festival circuit last year, but the sheer magnitude of the project made it unclear where it might live once it had finished traveling the world, or if it would be possible for the public to see it. Fortunately, the answers to those questions turned out to be “everywhere” and “very.” Here’s IndieWire’s Steve Greene on the 59-minute film into which this enormous piece of experimental art has been newly reshaped:

Read More‘the bomb’ Review: New Doc on Netflix Is a Surreal Music Video About the End of the World

Directed by Kevin Ford, Smriti Keshari, and Eric Schlosser, this experimental, sensory history of the nuclear bomb is a staggering look at the world’s most destructive weapon and the lessons of almost eight decades that some still choose to ignore. Threading together modern-day news footage, Cold War era safety videos and grainy archival peeks into the construction process, “the bomb” looks at nuclear weapons in their myriad historic forms. Foregoing the usual talking head interviews or explanatory narration, the one piece of connective tissue throughout the film, besides the subject itself, is the film’s score, from Los Angeles electronic minimalist outfit The Acid. Throughout a harrowing parade of images and fleeting moments of whimsy, the droning, pulsating music underneath brings an alternating sense of dread and power.

Begins streaming August 1st.

5. “Cloud Atlas” (2012)

It’s easy to make fun of “Cloud Atlas,” and not just because one of the six characters that Tom Hanks plays is pretty much a live-action Jar Jar Binks. Tom Tykwer and the Wachowskis’ cosmically ambitious sci-fi epic is — in its own delirious way — one of the most earnest movies ever made. Adapted from David Mitchell’s novel of the same name, and now something of an obvious precursor to the Wachowskis’ Netflix series “Sense 8,” this symphonic story of spiritual connection spans from 1849 to 2321 in a go-for-broke attempt to crystallize the effects that one life can have on countless others.

Controversially casting individual actors in multiple roles (with many of the film’s most famous stars disguising themselves as different races and genders), “Cloud Atlas” fearlessly envisions our world as a place where bodies are temporary, but love is eternal. It’s a lot to swallow, but our collective cynicism only makes the movie more valuable, and more important to have on hand.

Begins streaming August 1st.

4. “Donald Cried” (2016)

Kris Avedisian flew under the radar when “Donald Cried” made the rounds last year — his self-directed turn as the most deeply committed man-child since “Clifford” may have been just a bit too raw and cringe-inducing for any major traction — but it’s only a matter of time before people discover one of the most fearless performances in recent memory. Here’s IndieWire’s Eric Kohn on a future dark comedy classic:

The obnoxious man-child is a common trope in American comedies, but few recent examples can match the hilariously unsettling presence of Donald Treebeck, the obnoxious central figure played by writer-director Kris Avedisian in his effective black comedy “Donald Cried.” While the story technically unfolds from the perspective of his old teen pal Peter (Jesse Wakeman), who returns to their Rhode Island suburbs from his Wall Street career after his grandmother dies, Donald welcomes his reluctant friend back to their world and won’t leave him alone. Avedisian gives Danny McBride a run for his money in this pitch-perfect embodiment of a wannabe charmer all too eager to remain the center of attention. Hardly reinventing the wheel, “Donald Cried” nevertheless spins it faster than usual, taking cues from its memorably irritating protagonist. Beneath its entertainment value, the movie also hints at the tragedy of aimless adulthood.

Begins streaming August 15th.

3. “The Matrix” (1999)

At this point, “The Matrix” has effectively become immune to any sort of qualitative criticism; there’s no use arguing that it’s “good” or “bad” or somewhere in between, it simply is. Less a movie than a cornerstone of contemporary pop culture (for better or worse), the Wachowskis’ absurdly influential orgy of mind-blowing action and high school philosophy arrived at the tail end of the 20th century in order to help define the 21st. Its aesthetic impact on the current breed of blockbusters is self-evident, but its more profound contributions have been largely off-screen, as the film brought futurism to the masses in a way that’s only possible to trace through its most unfortunate side effects (e.g. the diseased misogyny of “red pill” thinking).

Of course, “No can be told what the Matrix is. You have to see it for yourself.” Now that it’s on Netflix, it couldn’t be easier to do just that.

Begins streaming August 1st.

2. “Jackie Brown” (1997)

Every hardcore Tarantino fan’s favorite Tarantino film, “Jackie Brown” is more than just an homage to blaxploitation or the best Elmore Leonard adaptation ever made (sorry, “Out of Sight”), it’s also something of a tribute to all of the crime writer’s work and the scuzzy but soulful ethos that bound it together. To this day, “Jackie Brown” remains a major outlier for Qt. For one thing, it’s based on pre-existing material. For another, it’s got a bonafide sex scene. Last but not least, it’s about recognizably human characters who have genuine depth, who have real lives that feel as though they continue beyond the confines of a movie screen (no disrespect to the cartoonish avatars who populate Tarantino’s later, more solipsistic work — they serve their purpose to perfection).

Pam Grier is spectacular in the title role of a flight attendant with a drug smuggling side hustle. Robert Forster is heartbreaking as lovelorn bondsman Max Cherry. Hell, even Robert De Niro is phenomenal, the iconic actor beautifully playing against his legend by inhabiting the film’s most pathetic and disposable character. For anyone put off by the blockbuster scale of Tarantino’s recent work, “Jackie Brown” is a rock-solid reminder of his genius for elevating fevered pastiche into singular pathos. And the soundtrack owns.

Begins streaming August 1st.

1. “All These Sleepless Nights” (2016)

It would be reductive and unfair to say that Michal Marczak’s “All These Sleepless Nights” is the film that Terrence Malick has been trying to make for the last 10 years, but it certainly feels that way while you’re watching it. A mesmeric, free-floating odyssey that wends its way through a hazy year in the molten lives of two Polish twentysomethings, this unclassifiable wonder obscures the divide between fiction and documentary until the distinction is ultimately irrelevant.

Read MoreReview: ‘All These Sleepless Nights’ Is the Movie That Terrence Malick Has Been Trying to Make

Unfolding like a plotless reality show that was shot by Emmanuel Lubezki, this lucid dream of a movie paints an unmoored portrait of a city in the throes of an orgastic reawakening. From the opening images of fireworks exploding over downtown Warsaw, to the stunning final glimpse of Marczak’s main subject — Krzysztof Baginski (playing himself, as everyone does), who looks and moves like a young Baryshnikov — twirling between an endless row of stopped cars during the middle of a massive traffic jam, the film is high on the spirit of liberation. More than just a hypnotically hyper-real distillation of what it means to be young, “All These Sleepless Nights” is a haunted vision of what it means to have been young.

Begins streaming August 15th.

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- David Ehrlich

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DVD Review – House of 1000 Corpses (2003)

30 July 2017 11:30 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

House of 1000 Corpses, 2003.

Directed by Rob Zombie.

Starring Sid Haig, Bill Moseley, Sheri Moon, Karen Black, Tom Towles, Walton Goggins, Matthew McGrory, Rainn Wilson, Erin Daniels, and Dennis Fimple.

Synopsis:

Four young thrill-seekers exploring the backwoods of Texas become the victims of a family of sadistic killers.

With his latest movie 31 recently dividing audiences with its back-to-basics approach, crowdfunded production and the director’s seeming refusal to put out an uncensored cut, Fabulous Films have gone back to the beginning of controversial director/metal icon Rob Zombie’s filmmaking career and reissued his debut feature House of 1000 Corpses on DVD (why is there still no Blu-ray release for the UK?) and what an interesting exercise it is revisiting this offbeat little gem.

Interesting because there are many parallels between this movie and 31 – troubled production and director’s cuts notwithstanding, there are also plenty of narrative similarities – but whereas 31 felt rushed, »

- Amie Cranswick

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Samuel L Jackson & Salma Hayek interview: The Hitman’s Bodyguard, and breaking into Hollywood

27 July 2017 4:32 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Rob Leane Aug 14, 2017

Samuel L Jackson and Salma Hayek chat to us about their new flick, The Hitman’s Bodyguard, and how they got into Hollywood...

Samuel L. Jackson stars alongside Ryan Reynolds in The Hitman’s Bodyguard. Jackson is the hitman, and a key witness in a case to bring down a despot. Reynolds is the bodyguard, tasked with getting the hitman from A to B in order to testify in court.

Salma Hayek plays the wife of Jackson’s character. She’s locked up in prison for much of the film, with the carrot of her release being dangled to make Jackson’s killing machine comply in the upcoming legal proceedings.

We were invited to chat to the pair at a swanky hotel in London. And let me tell you: walking into a room with that much star-power in it is very nerve-wracking. Jackson was sat at a »

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Quentin Tarantino Does Manson? That’s News That Should Thrill Cinema Lovers

15 July 2017 9:50 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It happens often enough. A great filmmaker announces his next project and you feel a frisson of electricity, a little charge of “Oh, man, that sounds amazing.” I felt it when I heard that Damien Chazelle would follow “La La Land” with an epic drama about Neil Armstrong and the Apollo missions (call it “The Right Stuff Shoots the Moon”). Or when it was revealed, earlier this week, that Barry Jenkins, coming off “Moonlight,” would realize his long-gestating dream of adapting James Baldwin’s 1974 Harlem-set novel “If Beale Street Could Talk.” But it isn’t often — it’s almost never — that the mere announcement of a director’s upcoming film carries a jolt of meaning.

On Wednesday, it was revealed that Quentin Tarantino’s next movie would be a dramatization of the events surrounding the Manson family murders, in the summer of 1969. To me, that sounds like the first Tarantino film in a long while that has »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Why Quentin Tarantino’s Manson Murders Project Would Be a Radical Change of Pace

12 July 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It’s safe to say that Quentin Tarantino is not happy about Tuesday’s breaking news that his next almost-finished untitled script is based on the true history of the Charles Manson murders. That’s because the writer-director, who is one of Hollywood’s great true auteurs with a unique voice that is inimitable, likes to write his screenplays in private.

Tarantino is an artist, backed by patrons Bob and Harvey Weinstein, who has routinely turned down big-studio directing gigs in order to pursue his own muse. And he can be sensitive to the slings and arrows of public opinion. That’s because he wants to leave a meaningful cinematic legacy of just 10 films. So while he could always change his mind (as Steven Soderbergh did) about his career path, Tarantino does not take lightly his choice of what those last two films will be. (The last one might be “Kill Bill: Vol. 3, »

- Anne Thompson

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Why Quentin Tarantino’s Manson Murders Project Would Be a Radical Change of Pace

12 July 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

It’s safe to say that Quentin Tarantino is not happy about Tuesday’s breaking news that his next almost-finished untitled script is based on the true history of the Charles Manson murders. That’s because the writer-director, who is one of Hollywood’s great true auteurs with a unique voice that is inimitable, likes to write his screenplays in private.

Tarantino is an artist, backed by patrons Bob and Harvey Weinstein, who has routinely turned down big-studio directing gigs in order to pursue his own muse. And he can be sensitive to the slings and arrows of public opinion. That’s because he wants to leave a meaningful cinematic legacy of just 10 films. So while he could always change his mind (as Steven Soderbergh did) about his career path, Tarantino does not take lightly his choice of what those last two films will be. (The last one might be “Kill Bill: Vol. 3, »

- Anne Thompson

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Quentin Tarantino’s Manson Family Murders Movie: Here’s Everything You Need to Know About the Rumored Project

12 July 2017 9:52 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Quentin Tarantino rides again. The singular auteur — who continues to hint at his imminent retirement, even as he stumps for the possibility of making two more feature films — is reportedly working on what will be his ninth feature, and it’s both the perfect fit for his wild-eyed sensibilities and a perhaps totally unhinged dip into one of the worst moments in American history.

As the The Hollywood Reporter reported last night, the filmmaker is apparently lining up a new film based on the Manson Family murders, one that might reteam him with is “Inglorious Basterds” star Brad Pitt and Qt newbie Jennifer Lawrence for a deep dive look inside the crime spree that rocked the country back in the summer of ’69.

Read More: Quentin Tarantino in Talks With Brad Pitt for New Movie on the Manson Family Murders — Report

Manson and his followers killed nine people, most notably on »

- Kate Erbland

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Quentin Tarantino’s next film could be about the Manson Murders

12 July 2017 4:24 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Yesterday, some really interesting news began to spread throughout Hollywood. When it comes to some filmmakers, even the mere speculation that a new idea is percolating brings with it a rush of anticipation Apparently, the next movie project from Quentin Tarantino is closer than we think, and may actually be about Sharon Tate and the Charles Manson/Manson Family Murders. This would mark an original work by Tarantino, though one more clearly rooted in historical fact than any before. The true life tragedy, in which cult leader Manson ordered a number of his maniacal followers to attack the guests at a house in a swanky Los Angeles neighborhood, is terrifying. The insane followers brutally murdered everyone who was at the home, including actress Tate, who was eight months pregnant at the time and married to filmmaker Roman Polanski. Rumor has it that Tarantino has this planned for his next turn »

- Joey Magidson

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Quentin Tarantino’s Next Film Will Tackle The Manson Murders

11 July 2017 5:30 PM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

It’s been about a year and a half since we’ve heard anything from Tarantino. Back in December of 2015 was the release of Hateful Eight, his violent western that made the rounds in 70mm. The film itself did okay for itself, taking in $155 million worldwide off its modest $44 million budget, but since that time, there’s been almost no updates as to what Tarantino would be working on next. Would it be another western, as Tarantino has teased before, or could it be the oft-rumored and oft-debunked Kill Bill Vol. 3? 

It sounds like you can check off “none of the above,” as THR is now reporting that Tarantino’s next movie will be a take on the Manson Murders. According to the outlet, Tarantino is putting the final touches on the screenplay for the movie. Specific details are vague, but one of its centers is said to revolve around Sharon Tate. »

- Joseph Medina

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Quentin Tarantino working on Charles Manson film

11 July 2017 1:23 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Feature number nine would bring filmmaker closer to ‘retirement’.

Quentin Tarantino is understood to be working on a screenplay about the Manson Family murders.

While details of the screenplay remain under the proverbial wraps, the project appears to be unusual in that it might be based on actual figures and events from recent history, breaking from Tarantino’s tradition of fictitious characters and storylines.

The sequence of Manson Family murders in the summer of 1969 remains one of the most disturbing episodes in recent Us history.

The killings were carried out at the behest of ex-con and cult leader Charles Manson by members of his ‘family’, a commune-like collective that set up camp in California in the late 1960s.

One night in August 1969 group members slaughtered five people at the Hollywood residence of filmmaker Roman Polanski, including his then pregnant wife Sharon Tate. Manson and ‘family’ members were found guilty in 1971 and the ringleader, now 82, remains »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Quentin Tarantino working on Charles Manson script

11 July 2017 1:23 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Feature number nine would bring filmmaker closer to ‘retirement’.

Quentin Tarantino is understood to be working on a screenplay about the Manson Family murders.

While details of the screenplay remain under the proverbial wraps, the project appears to be unusual in that it might be based on actual figures and events from recent history, breaking from Tarantino’s tradition of fictitious characters and storylines.

The sequence of Manson Family murders in the summer of 1969 remains one of the most disturbing episodes in recent Us history.

The killings were carried out at the behest of ex-con and cult leader Charles Manson by members of his ‘family’, a commune-like collective that set up camp in California in the late 1960s.

One night in August 1969 group members slaughtered five people at the Hollywood residence of filmmaker Roman Polanski, including his then pregnant wife Sharon Tate. Manson and ‘family’ members were found guilty in 1971 and the ringleader, now 82, remains »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Quentin Tarantino working on Manson Family script

11 July 2017 1:23 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Feature number nine would bring filmmaker closer to ‘retirement’.

Quentin Tarantino is understood to be working on a screenplay about the Manson Family murders.

While details of the screenplay remain under the proverbial wraps, the project appears to be unusual in that it might be based on actual figures and events from recent history, breaking from Tarantino’s penchant for fictitious characters and settings.

The sequence of Manson Family murders in the summer of 1969 remains one of the most disturbing episodes in recent Us history.

The killings were carried out at the behest of ex-con and cult leader Charles Manson by members of his ‘family’, a commune-like collective that set up camp in California in the late 1960s.

One night in August 1969 group members slaughtered five people at the Hollywood residence of filmmaker Roman Polanski, including his then pregnant wife Sharon Tate. Manson and ‘family’ members were found guilty in 1971 and the ringleader, now 82, remains »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Unveils Series of Events to Celebrate 20th Anniversary

27 June 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Austin-based Alamo Drafthouse, which has gone from one theater to 28 locations since 1997, is unveiling a series of commemorative events to celebrate its 20th anniversary, Variety has learned exclusively.

“There is no better way for us to celebrate two decades of existence than sharing and celebrating movies we love,” said Tim League, Alamo Drafthouse founder and CEO. “That’s what our company is all about, and that’s what Alamo20 is all about.”

The original Alamo Drafthouse was a single-screen theater showing second-run titles that had been converted from an old warehouse. The promise to patrons was “good  food, good beer and good film, all at the same place.”

Related

Alamo Drafthouse, Kodak Partner on 35Mm Film Celebration (Exclusive)

The location gained notice quickly with Austin players such as “Dazed and Confused” director Richard Linklater and Harry Knowles of Ain’t It Cool News. Within its first year the venue was playing host to film premieres and hosting »

- Dave McNary

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Elizabeth Chomko’s Feature Debut Starring Hilary Swank Acquired by Bleecker Street

11 May 2017 1:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Hilary Swank: Time/ YouTube

Elizabeth Chomko’s feature debut has found a home. The Hollywood Reporter confirms that Bleecker Street snagged the North American rights to “What They Had,” a family drama toplined by Hilary Swank. Blythe Danner, Michael Shannon (“Boardwalk Empire”), Taissa Farmiga (“American Horror Story”), and Robert Forster (“Jackie Brown”) co-star in the film, which recently wrapped in Chicago and La.

Revolving around a family in crisis, “What They Had” sees Bridget (Swank) returning home to Chicago after her brother pressures her to “deal with her mother’s (Danner) Alzheimer’s and her father’s (Forster) reluctance to let go of their life together,” THR summarizes. Chomko penned the script, which won her a 2015 Nicholl Fellowship in Screenwriting.

“I was incredibly moved by Elizabeth’s story of a family working through their collective issues and the heartache of dealing with a loved one affected by Alzheimer’s,” Bleecker Street CEO Andrew Karpen commented. “We know audiences will relate to the characters’ love, compassion, and humor in dealing with each other.”

Chomko added, “Making this film has been a true labor of love for me, my creative team, and the magnificent cast. I could not be more delighted to include Bleecker Street among our family and have this film be part of theirs.”

Bleecker Street is planning a theatrical release for 2018.

Swank is among the project’s executive producers. Her recent credits include “You’re Not You” and “The Homesman.” The two-time Oscar winner — who took home awards for “Million Dollar Baby” and “Boys Don’t Cry” — has previously spoken out about the gender pay gap that persists in the film industry, noting “My male counterpart will get paid 10 times more than me — 10 times. Not double, but 10 times for the same job.” She explained, “Both [women and men] are compelling, interesting, diverse, [and] wonderful in all their own separate ways. And yet there’s an influx of male roles and there’s just not for women.”

Chomko is an actress whose credits include “The Mentalist,” “Common Law,” and “Terriers.”

Elizabeth Chomko’s Feature Debut Starring Hilary Swank Acquired by Bleecker Street was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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The Most Disappointing Year in Movies

25 April 2017 10:02 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

In 1997, a film cynic was born.

Seeing Star Wars ruined should have been a sign that 1997 would be the worst year ever for blockbusters. George Lucas’s Special Editions, intended to “improve” the original trilogy but mostly doing the opposite, started arriving in January. By the time of the release of the new version of Return of the Jedi in March, my anticipation for anything ought to have been demolished. But I couldn’t have imagined that was only the beginning.

Actually, the first steps towards the end of an era were made in the early ’90s. That just wasn’t a great time for big movies compared to the prior decade. Some of my biggest letdowns of all time included Hudson Hawk in 1991 and Death Becomes Her in 1992. Jurassic Park wasn’t good enough for me, having read the book. Independence Day put me to sleep in the theater. Beloved »

- Christopher Campbell

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Why Avengers Worked & Suicide Squad Didn’t, According To Chris Pratt

25 April 2017 7:48 AM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Like it or not, we live in an age of shared universes. Yes, it sounds like yet another Hollywood trend, like 3D or superhero movies, but in my opinion it's anything but. Growing up, I dreamed of a time when a Batman movie could work its way into a Superman movie. However, given the limitations of Hollywood at the time, we simply couldn’t make it work at the time. The closest thing we ever got to something like that was seeing Michael Keaton play Ray Nicolette in Jackie Brown and Out of Sight. Other than that, all we had to rely on was sequels, and even then, the same actors coming back was an unlikely prospect. The fact that we do it now is a huge plus in living in an era like today, even if they aren't all perfect.

Some studios have had some major growing pains in »

- Joseph Medina

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Film Review: ‘Mrs K’

20 April 2017 11:44 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Doing for Hong Kong screen veteran Kara Wai roughly what Tarantino did for Pam Grier in “Jackie Brown” (albeit with a lot less talking), Malaysian writer-director Ho Yuhang’s “Mrs K” is a stylish action movie whose light touch persuades us to accept still-lethal potential of a nearly 60-year-old heroine. Equal parts “Taken”-style thriller and old-school marital-arts/triad-meller homage, it’s expertly crafted good fun that should appeal to genre fans across many borders.

Wai (Aka Kara Hui and Wai Ying Hung) was still a teenager when she found fame via a slew of Shaw Brothers kung-fu epics starting in 1976. Since then she’s gone on to play a wide range of roles on the big and small screens, including an award-winning turn as an alcoholic divorcée in Ho’s own 2009 “At the End of Daybreak.” As the titular figure here, she gets to straddle both a dignified latter-day »

- Dennis Harvey

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