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Aaron Eckhart joins Amazon series 'The Romanoffs'

The Romanoffs, set to debut next year, recently added Isabelle Huppert and Christina Hendricks.

Aaron Eckhart has joined the slate of guest stars on The Romanoffs, Matthew Weiner’s follow-up to Mad Men, co-produced with Weinstein Television.

Eckhart joins recently announced guest stars Isabelle Huppert, Christina Hendricks, John Slattery, Jack Huston, Amanda Peet, and Marthe Keller.

Weiner is set to direct all episodes of the one-hour contemporary anthology series set around the globe featuring separate stories about people who believe themselves to be descendants of the Russian royal family.

Eckhart’s big screen credits include In The Company Of Men, which first drew him critical attention, as well as The Dark Knight as Harvey Dent/Two Face, The Black Dahlia, and London Has Fallen. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for Thank You For Smoking.

Eckhart was most recently seen co-starring opposite Tom Hanks in Clint Eastwood’s Sully, and in Bleed For This opposite Miles Teller.

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See full article at ScreenDaily »

Aaron Eckhart Joins Matthew Weiner's Amazon Series The Romanoffs

Aaron Eckhart Joins Matthew Weiner's Amazon Series The Romanoffs
Aaron Eckhart is the latest noteworthy addition to The Romanoffs, the contemporary anthology series being penned and directed for Amazon by Mad Men auteur Matthew Weiner.

Set around the globe and featuring separate stories about people who believe themselves to be descendants of the titular Russian royal family, the ensemble also includes Mad Men alumni Christina Hendricks and John Slattery, Amanda Peet (Brockmire), Jack Huston (Boardwalk Empire), Isabelle Huppert (Elle) and Marthe Keller (The Avignon Prophecy).

As it appears will always be the case with casting for the Weiner project, no details on Eckhart’s role were disclosed.

RelatedMad Men
See full article at TVLine.com »

‘American Gigolo’ TV Series Coming to Showtime From Neil Labute & Jerry Bruckheimer

  • Slash Film
‘American Gigolo’ TV Series Coming to Showtime From Neil Labute & Jerry Bruckheimer
If you’re going to hire somebody to write an American Gigolo TV series, Neil Labute isn’t a bad writer for the job. Showtime and Paramount TV have hired playwright, screenwriter, and director behind In the Company of Men, The Shape of Things, and The Wicker Man remake to adapt Paul Schrader‘s ’80s classic, American Gigolo, for television. The original film’s producer, Jerry Bruckheimer, is behind the […]

The post ‘American Gigolo’ TV Series Coming to Showtime From Neil Labute & Jerry Bruckheimer appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Neil Labute Gets Between The Sheets To Write ‘American Gigolo’ TV Series

  • The Playlist
A couple years back, Paramount blew the dust off of Paul Schrader‘s 1980 flick “American Gigolo,” enlisted him as an executive consultant, and started developing a TV series based on the movie. That’s about all the news there’s been about the project since, but it’s heating up again, with a terrific choice for a writer enlisted to get things going.

Read More: Max Landis To Write And Direct Remake Of John Landis’ ‘An American Werewolf In London

Neil Labute (“In The Company Of Men,” “Some Velvet Morning“) has been tapped to put his pen to the project that will be set in the present day, and explore Los Angeles’ culture of “wish fulfillment.” This seems to have a wider and different scope than Steven Soderbergh‘s “The Girlfriend Experience” on Starz!

Continue reading Neil Labute Gets Between The Sheets To Write ‘American Gigolo’ TV Series at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Neil Labute’s Making A Syfy Vampire Show, And That Makes Perfect Bloody Sense

  • Indiewire
Neil Labute’s Making A Syfy Vampire Show, And That Makes Perfect Bloody Sense
Some creators just say they’d like to work on something entirely different from what they’ve done before. But Neil Labute really walks that talk.

The playwright and filmmaker first broke out with the 1997 indie hit “In the Company of Men,” followed by more adult drama work like “The Shape of Things” and “Possession.” He’s also dabbled in other genres and mediums, including television — but his first official gig as a showrunner isn’t at all what you might expect.

Van Helsing” drops us into the middle of an apocalyptic Earth overrun by vampires. Our only savior might be the mysterious Vanessa, whose supernatural abilities include being able to change vampires back into humans with her own blood.

It’s a Syfy vampire action show shot in Canada, but don’t let its genre trappings fool you — it’s a surprisingly complex and intimate take. Check out an
See full article at Indiewire »

Neil Labute’s Making A Syfy Vampire Show, And That Makes Perfect Bloody Sense

Neil Labute’s Making A Syfy Vampire Show, And That Makes Perfect Bloody Sense
Some creators just say they’d like to work on something entirely different from what they’ve done before. But Neil Labute really walks that talk.

The playwright and filmmaker first broke out with the 1997 indie hit “In the Company of Men,” followed by more adult drama work like “The Shape of Things” and “Possession.” He’s also dabbled in other genres and mediums, including television — but his first official gig as a showrunner isn’t at all what you might expect.

Van Helsing” drops us into the middle of an apocalyptic Earth overrun by vampires. Our only savior might be the mysterious Vanessa, whose supernatural abilities include being able to change vampires back into humans with her own blood.

It’s a Syfy vampire action show shot in Canada, but don’t let its genre trappings fool you — it’s a surprisingly complex and intimate take. Check out an
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Playback’: Aaron Eckhart on ‘Sully,’ ‘Bleed for This’ and Working With Legends (Listen)

‘Playback’: Aaron Eckhart on ‘Sully,’ ‘Bleed for This’ and Working With Legends (Listen)
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast.

On today’s episode Jenelle Riley and I discuss this year’s crop of 10 Actors to Watch, being honored at the Hamptons International Film Festival. Nate Parker’s “The Birth of a Nation” is also opening this weekend, amid a torrent of controversy and a 60 Minutes special that appeared to just make things worse. And Mel Gibson’s “Hacksaw Ridge” is around the corner, its formerly embattled director looking to find purchase within the industry after his own highly publicized controversies.

Later on I’m talking to Aaron Eckhart, who has a pair of films in theaters this fall: Clint Eastwood’s “Sully” and Ben Younger’s “Bleed For This.” Both movies saw their world premieres at the Telluride Film Festival, which Eckhart attended and adored, and both projects see him taking on real-life characters. In “Sully” he stars as Chesley Sullenberger’s unsung co-pilot Jeff Skiles,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Aaron Eckhart Discusses His Approach to Playing Real-Life People

Aaron Eckhart Discusses His Approach to Playing Real-Life People
Few actors have balanced blockbuster movies with independent film as successful Aaron Eckhart, who first burst into the public consciousness with a blistering, unapologetic turn in Neil Labute’s 1997 feature debut, “In the Company of Men.” That star-making role earned Eckhart an Independent Spirit Award and set him on a path of complicated but often lovable antiheroes. Since then he’s gone on to appear in such beloved franchises as “The Dark Knight” and the “Olympus Has Fallen” series while delivering acclaimed turns in smaller-budget fare like “Thank You for Smoking” and “Rabbit Hole.”

His current slate is a perfect example; he’s co-starring with Tom Hanks in the Clint Eastwood-directed hit “Sully” as stalwart co-pilot Jeff Skiles. And later this month he’ll be seen in “Bleed for This” from writer-director Ben Younger. It tells the true story of world champion boxer Vinny Pazienza’s determination to get
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘All the Ways to Say I Love You’ Theater Review: Sex, Lies and Neil Labute’s Big Paddle

  • The Wrap
‘All the Ways to Say I Love You’ Theater Review: Sex, Lies and Neil Labute’s Big Paddle
Neil Labute is destined to be the first playwright to place an iPhone on stage and have an audience listen to his new play, “All the Ways to Say I Love You.” Since his promising early works “In the Company of Men” and “The Shape of Things,” Labute has gotten increasingly skimpy with his considerable talents. “All the Ways to Say I Love You” stars Judith Light and opened Wednesday at the Lucille Lortel Theatre under the auspices of McC. Ushers (and a press release) tell us it’s 60 minutes without intermission. Actually, “All the Ways” is only 60 minutes if you.
See full article at The Wrap »

'Van Helsing': TV Review

'Van Helsing': TV Review
A Syfy channel vampire serial overseen by provocateur playwright-filmmaker Neil Labute (In the Company of Men). Who says life still can't surprise you? Bigger shock: It's pretty good… or is at least, to quote that old critic's saw, "better than it has any right to be." But what do rights (or wrongs) matter in the evocatively realized post-apocalyptic near-future conjured by Labute and his collaborators? The year is 2019, three years since a volcano exploded at Yellowstone, covering most of the West Coast, if not the entire world, in sun-obstructing ash. No natural light means

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

7 Indie Filmmakers Making Must-See TV This Fall

  • Indiewire Television
7 Indie Filmmakers Making Must-See TV This Fall
Ava DuVernay, “Queen Sugar

The acclaimed “Selma” and “Middle of Nowhere” director is a storyteller first, and what better medium to delve deep into a story than television? In her first foray on the small screen, DuVernay allied herself with Oprah’s Own network for “Queen Sugar,” in which she examines the lives of the Bordelon siblings in Louisiana after the passing of their father who leaves them a sugarcane farm.

DuVernay has always been a champion of being the change she wants to see, and her work on “Queen Sugar” is no different. Beginning with adapting a novel from a woman of color, about black siblings, DuVernay also made a point to hire an all-female roster of directors for every episode. She even directed two herself, and the pilot shows that the same appreciation for a gorgeous, almost dreamy palette that “Selma” had, despite some rough subject matter. While
See full article at Indiewire Television »

7 Indie Filmmakers Making Must-See TV This Fall

  • Indiewire
7 Indie Filmmakers Making Must-See TV This Fall
Ava DuVernay, “Queen Sugar

The acclaimed “Selma” and “Middle of Nowhere” director is a storyteller first, and what better medium to delve deep into a story than television? In her first foray on the small screen, DuVernay allied herself with Oprah’s Own network for “Queen Sugar,” in which she examines the lives of the Bordelon siblings in Louisiana after the passing of their father who leaves them a sugarcane farm.

DuVernay has always been a champion of being the change she wants to see, and her work on “Queen Sugar” is no different. Beginning with adapting a novel from a woman of color, about black siblings, DuVernay also made a point to hire an all-female roster of directors for every episode. She even directed two herself, and the pilot shows that the same appreciation for a gorgeous, almost dreamy palette that “Selma” had, despite some rough subject matter. While
See full article at Indiewire »

Daily | Goings On | Fassbinder, Hu, Ospina

  • Keyframe
The Metrograph is screening all ten of Rainer Werner Fassbinder's favorite films: Nicholas Ray's Johnny Guitar, Howard Hawks's Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Charles Laughton's The Night of the Hunter, Vasily Shukshin's The Red Snowball Tree, Josef von Sternberg's Dishonored, Max Ophuls's Lola Montes, Michael Curtiz's Flamingo Road, Pier Paolo Pasolini's Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom, Raoul Walsh's The Naked and the Dead and Luchino Visconti's The Damned. Also in New York: King Hu’s A Touch of Zen and work by Luis Ospina. Screening tonight in Chicago: Nathan Silver's Riot, Mike Ott's Lancaster, CA and William Greaves's In the Company of Men. And we have a few more goings on. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Van Helsing finds Its vanessa helsing

Van Helsing finds Its vanessa helsing
SyFy’s Van Helsing has found its lead in Kelly Overton. The 13-episode take on the myth of Dracula will star Overton as the granddaughter of legendary vampire hunter Abraham Van Helsing who is resurrected five years in the future to find that vampires have taken over the world.

So she starts off dead? Or has she been cryogenically frozen specifically to be preserved until her talents — whatever those may be — are needed? In what five-years-ahead future does this take place? If her grandfather was, say, 35 at the time of Dracula (published in 1897), his child could conceivably be an infant around then and would have its own child perhaps 30 years later, meaning approximately 1930. So going by Overton’s real-life age of 37, and adding in those five years she’s dead (or whatever), this would be 1972?

Lots of questions, but for me, the biggest mystery is why her name is Vanessa Helsing versus Vanessa Van Helsing.
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

Van Helsing: female-fronted TV series in development

  • Den of Geek
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Syfy has put a Van Helsing TV series into development, focusing on female protagonist Vanessa Helsing…

Presumably hoping to shake off any lingering memories of the Hugh Jackman-starring movie, Syfy is putting its own Van Helsing TV series together.

Following in the footsteps of Ghostbusters and – as of yesterday – Ocean’s Eleven, Syfy’s protagonist here will be Vanessa Helsing, a female version of the iconic Vampire hunter.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Vanessa Helsing will be ‘the next in a lineage of warriors who must lead mankind against a world controlled by vampires.’ She will be ‘resurrected five years in the future’ and find that she is ‘essentially humanity’s last hope to lead an offensive to take back what has been lost.’

The word ‘lineage’ there makes us think that this new take might use Professor Abraham van Hesling – the original version of the character,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Interview: Neil Labute Talks Dirty Weekend

The work of Neil Labute can be a nasty business. Particularly in his early writings for stage or screen, Labute's fiction placed an emphasis on humans with a flare for charismatic inhumanity, highlighting the worst aspects of society and its capacity for cruelty. A younger Labute could, in fact, be so tough on audiences that his first play was received with violent booing. But much has changed since plays/films like In The Company of Men or The Shape of Things scandalized their audiences. For one, Labute has accepted the Hollywood challenge of directing other writers' visions, like in Death at a Funeral or the remake of The Wicker Man (to varying degrees of reception). But as Labute told me over the phone, he's never been one...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Review: Neil Labute Is Kinder And Gentler In 'Dirty Weekend' Starring Matthew Broderick And Alice Eve

  • The Playlist
The Scandinavians have Lars Von Trier, and Americans may boast Harmony Korine as our enfante terrible, but writer/director Neil Labute is still unquestionably America’s premier big screen provocateur. Over the years, he’s poked, prodded and challenged audiences with many confrontational and discomfiting topics both in film and on the stage, tackling misogyny and sexism (“In The Company Of Men”), obesity/female body issues (the stage play “Fat Pig”), the duplicity of the art world and calculating females (“The Shape Of Things”), post 9/11 fallout (“The Mercy Seat”) and the repercussions of an interracial love triangle ("This Is How It Goes," "Lakeview Terrace”). Labute functions like a portrait artist of nasty, vicious human behavior, deceitful psychologies and devious assholes — his worldview is often deeply cynical, presenting the unpleasant aspects of human nature. Nearly once a year, he turns out a new work that’s sharp, funny, observational and indeed.
See full article at The Playlist »

The 10 Indies to Watch on VOD This September: 'Time Out of Mind,' 'Steve Jobs' and More

  • Indiewire
The 10 Indies to Watch on VOD This September: 'Time Out of Mind,' 'Steve Jobs' and More
Read More: The 17 Indie Films You Must See This September: '99 Homes,' 'Goodnight Mommy' and More "Two Step" (September 1)After opening in limited release on July 31, Alex R. Johnson's well-reviewed, SXSW-nominated thriller "Two Step" finally becomes available On Demand this month with its fair share of genre surprises. Skyy Moore stars as college dropout James, who learns that his deceased grandmother was the victim of the "Grandparent Scam," in which someone posing as James has been gradually stealing thousands of dollars from her. When the culprit shows up at James' door, a complex series of characters and events provide twists and turns you won't see coming. Throw in Johnson's assured direction and Andy Lilien's deep-focus cinematography, and "Two Step" is a thriller not to miss. "Dirty Weekend" (September 4)Filmmaker and playwright Neil Labute has always excelled at character duets (see "In The Company of Men"),...
See full article at Indiewire »

The Essential Films of Neil Labute, Canny Inquisitor of White People Problems

The Essential Films of Neil Labute, Canny Inquisitor of White People Problems
Neil Labute aims at the angst and entitlement of yuppies like a kid with a magnifying glass, torturing ants. He writes and directs comedies where you're not really laughing: you're choking on your own discomfort as he pokes and prods the sexual crises of the bored, the rich, the spoiled, the middle-classed. Which is to say many of us. Cuckolds, man-babies and emotional eunuchs are some of the types you'll encounter in Labute's films, which are brazenly, specifically about the facade of the American hegemony, and the fictions it is barely concealing. You'd never known from his savagely charming and scabrous comedies that Labute is a lapsed Mormon who, before getting kicked out of the Church of Lds in the late-1990s for a deemed-to-be offensive off-Broadway play, started at Brigham Young, where he met one of his earliest screen co-conspirators, actor Aaron Eckhart. In Labute's cruelly funny film debut
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Fascinating ‘Queen of Earth’ plunges into mental illness but withholds insight

  • SoundOnSight
Queen of Earth

Written & Directed by Alex Ross Perry

USA, 2015

There are moments in Alex Ross Perry’s Queen of Earth that feel so intimate you almost hold your breath for fear of being overheard. There are also moments of artificiality that feel so contrived you’re left wondering what Perry was thinking. Swirling at the center of this perplexing drama is a revelatory performance from Elisabeth Moss, who perfectly captures the brittle yet impenetrable nature of mental illness. While its unabashed hostility and nasty characterizations prevent this from being an enjoyable film, it is also undeniably fascinating. Required viewing for hardcore cinephiles.

It is perfectly acceptable for a filmmaker to ask dozens of questions he has no intention of answering. The problems start when the filmmaker loses track of what the questions are about. Queen of Earth wallows in its ambiguity so deeply that it eventually suffocates. Much like
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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