In the Company of Men
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005

12 items from 2016


‘American Gigolo’ TV Series Coming to Showtime From Neil Labute & Jerry Bruckheimer

9 November 2016 6:30 AM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

If you’re going to hire somebody to write an American Gigolo TV series, Neil Labute isn’t a bad writer for the job. Showtime and Paramount TV have hired playwright, screenwriter, and director behind In the Company of MenThe Shape of Things, and The Wicker Man remake to adapt Paul Schrader‘s ’80s classic, American Gigolo, for television. The original film’s producer, Jerry Bruckheimer, is behind the […]

The post ‘American Gigolo’ TV Series Coming to Showtime From Neil Labute & Jerry Bruckheimer appeared first on /Film. »

- Jack Giroux

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Neil Labute Gets Between The Sheets To Write ‘American Gigolo’ TV Series

8 November 2016 8:50 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

A couple years back, Paramount blew the dust off of Paul Schrader‘s 1980 flick “American Gigolo,” enlisted him as an executive consultant, and started developing a TV series based on the movie. That’s about all the news there’s been about the project since, but it’s heating up again, with a terrific choice for a writer enlisted to get things going.

Read More: Max Landis To Write And Direct Remake Of John Landis’ ‘An American Werewolf In London

Neil Labute (“In The Company Of Men,” “Some Velvet Morning“) has been tapped to put his pen to the project that will be set in the present day, and explore Los Angeles’ culture of “wish fulfillment.” This seems to have a wider and different scope than Steven Soderbergh‘s “The Girlfriend Experience” on Starz!

Continue reading Neil Labute Gets Between The Sheets To Write ‘American Gigolo’ TV Series at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Neil Labute’s Making A Syfy Vampire Show, And That Makes Perfect Bloody Sense

7 October 2016 1:06 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Some creators just say they’d like to work on something entirely different from what they’ve done before. But Neil Labute really walks that talk.

The playwright and filmmaker first broke out with the 1997 indie hit “In the Company of Men,” followed by more adult drama work like “The Shape of Things” and “Possession.” He’s also dabbled in other genres and mediums, including television — but his first official gig as a showrunner isn’t at all what you might expect.

Van Helsing” drops us into the middle of an apocalyptic Earth overrun by vampires. Our only savior might be the mysterious Vanessa, whose supernatural abilities include being able to change vampires back into humans with her own blood.

It’s a Syfy vampire action show shot in Canada, but don’t let its genre trappings fool you — it’s a surprisingly complex and intimate take. Check out an »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Neil Labute’s Making A Syfy Vampire Show, And That Makes Perfect Bloody Sense

7 October 2016 1:06 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Some creators just say they’d like to work on something entirely different from what they’ve done before. But Neil Labute really walks that talk.

The playwright and filmmaker first broke out with the 1997 indie hit “In the Company of Men,” followed by more adult drama work like “The Shape of Things” and “Possession.” He’s also dabbled in other genres and mediums, including television — but his first official gig as a showrunner isn’t at all what you might expect.

Van Helsing” drops us into the middle of an apocalyptic Earth overrun by vampires. Our only savior might be the mysterious Vanessa, whose supernatural abilities include being able to change vampires back into humans with her own blood.

It’s a Syfy vampire action show shot in Canada, but don’t let its genre trappings fool you — it’s a surprisingly complex and intimate take. Check out an »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Playback’: Aaron Eckhart on ‘Sully,’ ‘Bleed for This’ and Working With Legends (Listen)

6 October 2016 10:39 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast.

On today’s episode Jenelle Riley and I discuss this year’s crop of 10 Actors to Watch, being honored at the Hamptons International Film Festival. Nate Parker’s “The Birth of a Nation” is also opening this weekend, amid a torrent of controversy and a 60 Minutes special that appeared to just make things worse. And Mel Gibson’s “Hacksaw Ridge” is around the corner, its formerly embattled director looking to find purchase within the industry after his own highly publicized controversies.

Later on I’m talking to Aaron Eckhart, who has a pair of films in theaters this fall: Clint Eastwood’s “Sully” and Ben Younger’s “Bleed For This.” Both movies saw their world premieres at the Telluride Film Festival, which Eckhart attended and adored, and both projects see him taking on real-life characters. In “Sully” he stars as Chesley Sullenberger’s unsung co-pilot Jeff Skiles, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Aaron Eckhart Discusses His Approach to Playing Real-Life People

6 October 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Few actors have balanced blockbuster movies with independent film as successful Aaron Eckhart, who first burst into the public consciousness with a blistering, unapologetic turn in Neil Labute’s 1997 feature debut, “In the Company of Men.” That star-making role earned Eckhart an Independent Spirit Award and set him on a path of complicated but often lovable antiheroes. Since then he’s gone on to appear in such beloved franchises as “The Dark Knight” and the “Olympus Has Fallen” series while delivering acclaimed turns in smaller-budget fare like “Thank You for Smoking” and “Rabbit Hole.”

His current slate is a perfect example; he’s co-starring with Tom Hanks in the Clint Eastwood-directed hit “Sully” as stalwart co-pilot Jeff Skiles. And later this month he’ll be seen in “Bleed for This” from writer-director Ben Younger. It tells the true story of world champion boxer Vinny Pazienza’s determination to get »

- Jenelle Riley

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‘All the Ways to Say I Love You’ Theater Review: Sex, Lies and Neil Labute’s Big Paddle

28 September 2016 5:47 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Neil Labute is destined to be the first playwright to place an iPhone on stage and have an audience listen to his new play, “All the Ways to Say I Love You.” Since his promising early works “In the Company of Men” and “The Shape of Things,” Labute has gotten increasingly skimpy with his considerable talents. “All the Ways to Say I Love You” stars Judith Light and opened Wednesday at the Lucille Lortel Theatre under the auspices of McC. Ushers (and a press release) tell us it’s 60 minutes without intermission. Actually, “All the Ways” is only 60 minutes if you. »

- Robert Hofler

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'Van Helsing': TV Review

22 September 2016 7:52 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

A Syfy channel vampire serial overseen by provocateur playwright-filmmaker Neil Labute (In the Company of Men). Who says life still can't surprise you? Bigger shock: It's pretty good… or is at least, to quote that old critic's saw, "better than it has any right to be." But what do rights (or wrongs) matter in the evocatively realized post-apocalyptic near-future conjured by Labute and his collaborators? The year is 2019, three years since a volcano exploded at Yellowstone, covering most of the West Coast, if not the entire world, in sun-obstructing ash. No natural light means

read more

»

- Keith Uhlich

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7 Indie Filmmakers Making Must-See TV This Fall

9 September 2016 11:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Ava DuVernay, “Queen Sugar

The acclaimed “Selma” and “Middle of Nowhere” director is a storyteller first, and what better medium to delve deep into a story than television? In her first foray on the small screen, DuVernay allied herself with Oprah’s Own network for “Queen Sugar,” in which she examines the lives of the Bordelon siblings in Louisiana after the passing of their father who leaves them a sugarcane farm.

DuVernay has always been a champion of being the change she wants to see, and her work on “Queen Sugar” is no different. Beginning with adapting a novel from a woman of color, about black siblings, DuVernay also made a point to hire an all-female roster of directors for every episode. She even directed two herself, and the pilot shows that the same appreciation for a gorgeous, almost dreamy palette that “Selma” had, despite some rough subject matter. While »

- Ben Travers, Hanh Nguyen and Liz Shannon Miller

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7 Indie Filmmakers Making Must-See TV This Fall

9 September 2016 11:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Ava DuVernay, “Queen Sugar

The acclaimed “Selma” and “Middle of Nowhere” director is a storyteller first, and what better medium to delve deep into a story than television? In her first foray on the small screen, DuVernay allied herself with Oprah’s Own network for “Queen Sugar,” in which she examines the lives of the Bordelon siblings in Louisiana after the passing of their father who leaves them a sugarcane farm.

DuVernay has always been a champion of being the change she wants to see, and her work on “Queen Sugar” is no different. Beginning with adapting a novel from a woman of color, about black siblings, DuVernay also made a point to hire an all-female roster of directors for every episode. She even directed two herself, and the pilot shows that the same appreciation for a gorgeous, almost dreamy palette that “Selma” had, despite some rough subject matter. While »

- Ben Travers, Hanh Nguyen and Liz Shannon Miller

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Daily | Goings On | Fassbinder, Hu, Ospina

22 April 2016 11:36 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The Metrograph is screening all ten of Rainer Werner Fassbinder's favorite films: Nicholas Ray's Johnny Guitar, Howard Hawks's Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Charles Laughton's The Night of the Hunter, Vasily Shukshin's The Red Snowball Tree, Josef von Sternberg's Dishonored, Max Ophuls's Lola Montes, Michael Curtiz's Flamingo Road, Pier Paolo Pasolini's Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom, Raoul Walsh's The Naked and the Dead and Luchino Visconti's The Damned. Also in New York: King Hu’s A Touch of Zen and work by Luis Ospina. Screening tonight in Chicago: Nathan Silver's Riot, Mike Ott's Lancaster, CA and William Greaves's In the Company of Men. And we have a few more goings on. » - David Hudson »

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Van Helsing finds Its vanessa helsing

17 February 2016 7:25 PM, PST | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

SyFy’s Van Helsing has found its lead in Kelly Overton. The 13-episode take on the myth of Dracula will star Overton as the granddaughter of legendary vampire hunter Abraham Van Helsing who is resurrected five years in the future to find that vampires have taken over the world.

So she starts off dead? Or has she been cryogenically frozen specifically to be preserved until her talents — whatever those may be — are needed? In what five-years-ahead future does this take place? If her grandfather was, say, 35 at the time of Dracula (published in 1897), his child could conceivably be an infant around then and would have its own child perhaps 30 years later, meaning approximately 1930. So going by Overton’s real-life age of 37, and adding in those five years she’s dead (or whatever), this would be 1972?

Lots of questions, but for me, the biggest mystery is why her name is Vanessa Helsing versus Vanessa Van Helsing. »

- Harker Jones

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005

12 items from 2016


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