The son of the Greek Gods Zeus and Hera is stripped of his immortality as an infant and must become a true hero in order to reclaim it.

Writers:

(animation screenplay by), (animation screenplay by) | 16 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
843 ( 84)

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON TV
ON DISC
ALL
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 9 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Hercules (voice)
...
Young Hercules (voice)
...
Young Hercules (singing voice)
...
Phil (voice)
...
Hades (voice)
...
Meg (voice)
...
Pain (voice)
...
Panic (voice)
...
Zeus (voice)
...
...
...
Amphitryon (voice)
...
...
Clotho (voice)
...
Lachesis (voice)

What You Missed at San Diego Comic-Con 2017

From the madness of the convention floor to the emotional panel reveals and star-studded interviews, catch up on all the unforgettable sights from Comic-Con.

Browse Our Guide to Comic-Con

Edit

Storyline

Hercules, son of the Greek God, Zeus, is turned into a half-god, half-mortal by evil Hades, God of the Underworld, who plans to overthrow Zeus. Hercules is raised on Earth and retains his god-like strength, but when he discovers his immortal heritage Zeus tells him that to return to Mount Olympus he must become a true hero. Hercules becomes a famous hero with the help of his friend Pegasus and his personal trainer, Phil the satyr. Hercules battles monsters, Hades and the Titans, but it is his self-sacrifice to rescue his love Meg which makes him a true hero. Written by Kristi Connolly <kristic@nlc.net.au>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

hercules | zeus | hero | hades | underworld | See All (98) »

Taglines:

Zero to Hero! See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

| |

Release Date:

27 June 1997 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Herkules  »

Box Office

Budget:

$85,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$249,567 (USA) (13 June 1997)

Gross:

$99,046,791 (USA) (19 December 1997)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1 / (high definition)
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

During production, Meg was originally given a ballad titled "I Can't Believe My Heart", but Ken Duncan, the supervising animator of Meg, pointed out the song was out of character for Meg. Alan Menken and David Zippel would later compose "I Won't Say I'm In Love" instead. See more »

Goofs

When Meg finds Hercules behind the curtain, he is missing a wrist band on his left wrist. It reappears the next time we see him. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: Long ago, in the faraway land of ancient Greece, there was a golden age of powerful gods and extraordinary heroes. And the greatest and strongest of all these heroes was the mighty Hercules. But what is the measure of a true hero? Ah, that is what our story is...
Thalia: Will you listen to him? He's makin' the story sound like some Greek tragedy.
Terpsichore: Lighten up, dude.
Calliope: We'll take it from here, darling.
Narrator: You go, girl.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The film opens with a prologue by a narrator, but the Muses interrupt and take over. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Nostalgia Chick: The Lion King (in 3D!) (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

I Won't Say I'm in Love
Music by Alan Menken
Lyrics by David Zippel
Performed by Susan Egan
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

A great villain
13 June 1999 | by (Chicago, IL) – See all my reviews

I don't usually like villains, even in Disney movies, because they're too scary, but I loved James Woods as Hades. He was so funny. I loved the way he called Megara "my little nutmeg." I also loved the way they depicted Thebes like New York and they called it "the big olive." I loved Meg's cynical and sarcastic attitude. Hercules himself was rather bland. I loved the song "Go the Distance." Paul Wylie skated to it and showed how powerful the song is. I really enjoyed this movie and I don't care if it departs from Greek mythology. It was really about our time anyway. I'd watch it again in a Pelopenisian minute.


25 of 34 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?