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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

9 items from 2016


Stranger Things Season 1 Review

13 July 2016 4:44 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

All 8 episodes were provided prior to broadcast.

At one point in Netflix’s perfectly titled Stranger Things (no plot spoilers, pinky promise), one of the show’s plucky, impeccably nerdy heroes, Dustin (Gaten Matarazzo), loses his mind over the short run-time of a Dungeons & Dragons campaign. Defacto leader Mike (Finn Wolfhard) rebuffs: “It was 10 hours!” By the time the credits roll, Stranger Things more than earns Dustin’s meta joke: it’s hard to leave the sleepy, Amblin-inspired hamlet of Hawkins, Indiana behind, even when you realize you just spent 8 hours embedded in its strangeness.

Like Dead of Summer (although far more lovingly, obsessively detailed), Stranger Things first-and-foremost perfects its tonal period balance between a charm- and menace-filled Spielbergian kids’ adventure, and the hyper-modern update of that, à la Super 8.

In Hawkins, shadowy figures roam an abandoned lab in the middle of the forest, a group of pre-teens debate the »

- Mitchel Broussard

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Ridley Scott collaborator Julie Payne dies aged 64

12 July 2016 4:13 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Producer and managing director of Scott Free has died.

Film producer Julie Payne, a long-time collaborator of Ridley Scott, has died aged 64 following a short battle with cancer.

Payne managed the London operations of Scott’s Scott Free Films for more than 15 years, producing and executive producing projects for the company including Richard Loncraine’s The Gathering Storm and follow-up Into The Storm - winning two Golden Globes and two Emmys.

Payne also executive produced Scott’s own France-set comedy A Good Year, and produced Jordan Scott’s debut feature film Cracks.

Payne’s collaboration with Scott dates back to the late-80s, when she worked across some of Scott’s most notable movies in various roles starting with Thelma & Louise in 1991 through to G.I. Jane and Gladiator.

Payne originally started her career at the BBC in the early 1970s, working first in their costume department and then in costume allocation.  She subsequently »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Ridley Scott Longtime Collaborator Julie Payne Dies at 64

12 July 2016 1:42 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Ridley Scott’s Scott Free Films has revealed that the managing director of its London office, producer Julie Payne, died of cancer last month at the age of 64.

Payne managed Scott Free’s London operations for more than 15 years, producing and executive producing projects for the company including Emmy- and Golden Globe-winner “The Gathering Storm” and follow-up “Into the Storm.” Payne also executive produced Scott’s own France-set comedy “A Good Year,” and produced Jordan Scott’s debut feature film “Cracks.”

Payne’s collaboration with Scott dated back to the late-80s, when she worked across some of his most notable movies in various roles starting with “Thelma & Louise” in 1991 through to “G.I. Jane” and “Gladiator.”

Payne originally started her career at the BBC in the early ‘70s, working first in their costume department and then in costume allocation. She subsequently joined producer Sandy Lieberson, who ultimately introduced her to Scott.

As »

- Leo Barraclough

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Ridley Scott Longtime Collaborator Julie Payne Dies at 64

12 July 2016 1:42 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ridley Scott’s Scott Free Films has revealed that the managing director of its London office, producer Julie Payne, died of cancer last month at the age of 64.

Payne managed Scott Free’s London operations for more than 15 years, producing and executive producing projects for the company including Emmy- and Golden Globe-winner “The Gathering Storm” and follow-up “Into the Storm.” Payne also executive produced Scott’s own France-set comedy “A Good Year,” and produced Jordan Scott’s debut feature film “Cracks.”

Payne’s collaboration with Scott dated back to the late-80s, when she worked across some of his most notable movies in various roles starting with “Thelma & Louise” in 1991 through to “G.I. Jane” and “Gladiator.”

Payne originally started her career at the BBC in the early ‘70s, working first in their costume department and then in costume allocation. She subsequently joined producer Sandy Lieberson, who ultimately introduced her to Scott. »

- Leo Barraclough

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The Academy has invited 683 new members to join their ranks

30 June 2016 11:18 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Yesterday afternoon, the ranks of Oscar voters grew substantially, with some welcome diversity added in for good measure. Yes, the Academy sent out invitations for new membership about 24 hours ago, with 683 names getting the coveted tap on the proverbial shoulder. Again, what made it so interesting to note is that AMPAS seemed to actively seek out women, minorities, and younger artists, hoping to make the demographics of the Academy slightly less centered on older white males. It won’t suddenly change the makeup of the Oscar nominations or upend how the Academy Awards go down next year, but it’s a slow step in the right direction, and that’s worth applauding for sure. As you can see below, in addition to basically all of last year’s Oscar winners, the new members are a diverse slate. Among the names you’ll see in the acting branch now are John Boyega, »

- Joey Magidson

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Review: ‘Blood Stripe’

14 June 2016 2:10 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

After U.S. participation in the 20th century’s “Great Wars” turned to participation in some not-so-great, still-debated wars, Hollywood tended to take a few years before offering critical fictive input on those conflicts. But American deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan continues to drag on, whatever happy-face scenarios are offered to the media. While we await the big W.-era propaganda critique of Ang Lee’s literary adaptation “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” this fall, “Blood Stripe” delivers a smaller-scale weighing of the “War on Terror’s” toll on average grunts. Veteran actor Remy Auberjonois’ polished feature debut provides an impressive showcase for co-scenarist Kate Nowlin as a career Marine derailed by Ptsd upon return to civilian life. This ambitious drama won the Laff prize for homegrown narrative fiction feature, though its somewhat awkward vacillation between serious character study and under-realized thriller elements will limit commercial exposure.

A thirtysomething Marine Corps sergeant never actually named here, but half-jokingly, half-respectfully referred to as “Our Sergeant” (Nowlin), arrives back from her latest — and perhaps, it seems, last — deployment to a minimal welcome. She’s picked up late at from the airport by an in-law. At home, burly husband Rusty (Chris Sullivan) does not make a display of conspicuous enthusiasm. They seem to have a somewhat prickly, not particularly affectionate relationship, suggestive of pre-existing tensions that go unspecified.

Whatever preceded, however, “Sarge” is clearly barely holding it together in this particular return to civilian life: Pounding beers without effect, compulsively jogging, mowing the lawn at midnight and other borderline-manic actions that seem to be keeping some kind of breakdown thinly at bay. At a welcome-home party, a guest’s playful hug triggers drastic over-reaction from her. After that, there’s no further denying she needs help. But she’s sadly aware that appropriate services at a Va Hospital wouldn’t be available for months, sighing, “There’s a wait.”

One day at the tedious municipal road-work job she’s gotten, something in Our Sergeant snaps. She gets in her car and drives hours to the site of a childhood summer camp. It’s the beginning of the off-season, with seemingly sole remaining employee Dot (Rusty Schwimmer) packing things up for the winter. Having no plan, and not having told anyone where she is, Sarge gets a room-and-board gig that’s just what her anxious mind and coiled Marine body needs: Endless, heavy-lifting grunt work.

The two women’s quiet camaraderie, the tranquil setting, and the hard physical labor do seem to make Sarge better, relaxing such that she answers admiring Dot’s questions about her several Iraq and Afghanistan deployments, in terse but revealing terms. But she’s still in a highly fragile state, agitated further by a mixed bag of interlopers to the camp. They include a visiting group of church elders led by gregarious Art (the writer-helmer’s father René Auberjonois, still a theatrically flamboyant presence in his mid-70s); his adoptive-son-of-sorts (Tom Lipinski as another nameless figure, dubbed only “The Fisherman”), a fellow moody loner; and some local louts whose lewd menace Sarge’s addled mindset may or may not be exaggerating.

It’s when these additional characters arrive at midpoint that real-life spouses Nowlin and Auberjonois’ script begins to stumble, after a strong buildup. While the director has cited such deliberately dislocating films about various forms of mental illness and Ptsd as “Repulsion” and “Martha Marcy May Marlene” as models here, “Blood Stripe” grows more tonally muddled than those singular portraits of escalating trauma. The warm-and-fuzzy church group, Lipinski’s conventional Heathcliff-like romantic figure, the poorly integrated thriller elements (a more congruent film would’ve made those local yokels a constant phantom menace) and a vague, unconvincing climactic catharsis all weaken what had initially seems a tougher-minded film. Then there’s the contrivance necessary to keep Sarge from being “rescued” by Rusty, even after she’s made a couple panicked calls back home.

On the plus side, “Blood Stripe” is cryptic in interesting ways, most notably in that we never actually find out what “happened to” Sarge: The film forgoes convention in omitting a flashback, or even a monologue, wherein a specific traumatic combat incident “explains all.” (At one point, however, we do glimpse dramatic scars on her back, and her automatic-recoil reaction to most physical contact raises the possibility of assault or torture.) That’s a refreshing change from formula, not least because it leaves open the possibility that her Ptsd springs from cumulative experience rather than the typical fictive Big Event — a more realistic approach.

Nowlin fully invests in her role, credibly creating a born career-military type nonetheless pushed over the brink — a fully-combat-participatory female soldier relatively new to both U.S. policy and to movies, if you discount the likes of the ludicrous “G.I. Jane.” Schwimmer, Sullivan and Lipinsky are solid in support, even if the latter’s role feels less organic. While its storytelling wavers, there’s nothing unsteady about the movie’s overall packaging craftsmanship, most notably Radium Cheung’s widescreen photography of the gorgeous northern-Minnesota lake country.

»

- Dennis Harvey

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Ridley Scott to Receive American Cinematheque Honor

7 June 2016 11:08 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Director-producer Ridley Scott will receive the 30th American Cinematheque award.

The presentation will take place on Oct. 14 at the Beverly Hilton.

Scott received Academy Award director nominations for “Black Hawk Down,” “Gladiator” and “Thelma and Louise.” Othe directing credits include “Alien,” “Black Rain,” “Blade Runner,” “The Duelists,” “Exodus: Gods and Kings,” “G.I. Jane,” “Kingdom of Heaven,” “Legend,” “The Martian,” “Matchstick Men,” “Prometheus,” “Robin Hood,” “Someone to Watch Over Me” and “White Squall.”

The American Cinematheque is extremely pleased to honor Ridley Scott as the 30th recipient of the American Cinematheque award at our celebration this year,” said American Cinematheque Chairman Rick Nicita. “To state it simply, Ridley Scott is one of the greatest directors in the history of the motion picture.”

“From his first feature, ‘The Duelists,’ to his most recent, ‘The Martian,’ the films of Ridley Scott have combined keenly observed humanity with dazzling state-of-the-art effects and design in »

- Dave McNary

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Demi Moore to Star in Drama Series From Rookie Blue Co-Creator

23 February 2016 3:57 PM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Demi Moore is getting back to her small-screen roots — and her next role is more G.I. Jane than Ghost.

The actress is set to topline 10 Days In the Valley, a drama series from Rookie Blue co-creator Tassie Cameron, our sister site Deadline reports.

Related2016 Renewal Scorecard: What’s Coming Back? What’s Getting Cancelled? What’s on the Bubble?

The project stars Moore as Jane Sadler, an overworked writer and single mother in the middle of a difficult separation. When her 5-year-old daughter is taken from her bed in the middle of the night, Jane is forced to put everything »

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‘The Martian’ Production Design Took Cues From NASA Concepts

1 January 2016 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Production designer Arthur Max has 13 feature films to his credit, and all but two of them have been Ridley Scott productions. It’s a consistent collaboration that has yielded two Oscar nominations (for 2000’s “Gladiator” and 2007’s “American Gangster”), and one that has run a wide spectrum, from intimate dramas (“G.I. Jane,” “Body of Lies”) to large-scale undertakings (“Kingdom of Heaven,” “Exodus: Gods and Kings”). Like 2012’s “Prometheus,” their latest collaboration, “The Martian,” takes Max and Scott off-planet for a bit of a sci-fi dip, though one much more grounded in the reality of space travel.

***

You’ve been incredibly loyal to Ridley Scott. Outside of two David Fincher projects, “Se7en” and “Panic Room,” all of your feature work has been with him.

I met both of them through commercials, at a stage where commercials were not only selling something but they were also very entertaining and I think set the bar for advertising. »

- Kristopher Tapley

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

9 items from 2016


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