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The Full Monty (1997) Poster

Trivia

The film's working title was "Eggs, Beans and Chippendales".
The six leads did in fact perform a full-frontal strip-tease in front of 400 extras. Director Peter Cattaneo described it as "a one-take deal."
In order to help the actors with the stress of the final scene all were allowed alcohol on set. The kiss Robert Carlyle puts on his son was not scripted resulting in the actors' perplexed reaction.
The title is a British slang phrase meaning "the whole thing." According to screenwriter Simon Beaufoy, US studio executives found it perplexing since nobody in the film is named Monty.
A number of American cinemas had special leaflets printed containing translations to some of the British slang left in the U.S version of the film so that audiences would be able to follow the dialog more easily.
The original cut of the film was too short, so three months after shooting ended, some more footage was shot, including the football/exercise montage. Robert Carlyle is not in that sequence; the actor was working on another project by then.
The Broadway production of the musical version of the movie "The Full Monty" opened at the Eugene O'Neill Theater in New York on October 26, 2000, ran for 770 performances and was nominated for the 2001 Tony Awards for the Best Musical, Book and Score.
In November 1998, Prince Charles re-enacted the unemployment office scene on national television with some young members of the Prince's Trust.
For the final sequence, the films choreographer was lying just in front of the stage, out of sight of the cameras, shouting out instructions to the actors.
Danny Boyle was offered the chance to direct the movie, but turned it down because he wasn't impressed with the story.
They shot the scene with Horse in the telephone box three times: the first with an old woman outside overhearing the conversation, the second with a gang of girls on a night out overhearing, and when neither of them worked, they reshot it with no one listening.
Rik Mayall was considered for the role of Gaz.
Although much is made of Horse (Paul Barber ) being "over the hill", Barber is actually 3 years younger than Tom Wilkinson, who plays Gerald.
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Robert Carlyle has said that filming was chaotic and that 20th Century Fox were so unhappy with the first cut that they considered scrapping its theatrical release and going straight to video. Carlyle has stated that it was the hard work of producer Uberto Pasolini and editor Nick Moore that rescued the film.
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Nicholas Lyndhurst was first choice for the role of Gaz, however Lyndurst turned role down saying "that it would have been too cold at that time of year to take your clothes off."
As of January 2017, this is the 23rd most successful movie ever shown at the UK Boxoffice, taking in £52m. It is believed that its success came in the wake of the death of Princess Diana, and that UK cinemagoers were looking for light relief after such a tragic event.
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In 1999, it was ranked #25 on the British Film Institute's 100 Greatest British Films of the 20th Century.
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First cinema film of Emily Woof.
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Russ Abbot was asked to play Gerald but was not free.
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