Deconstructing Harry (1997) - News Poster

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Movie Poster of the Week: The Top 10 Favorite Posters of Nathan Gelgud

  • MUBI
A couple of weeks ago, I interviewed Nathan Gelgud, an artist who has brought a wry comic book charm to the world of cinephilia. It seemed only natural that I should find out more about the art that has influenced him and so I asked him to select his personal top ten favorite movie posters. He was more than up for the challenge and decided to narrow the field to illustrated posters, which makes perfect sense. Here are his ten favorites, in no special order.1. (Above) Us one sheet for Five on the Black Hand Side (Oscar Williams, USA, 1973). Artist: Jack Davis.I love all the accouterments on the main figure—the hat, the cigar, the umbrella, suitcase, those things that go over the shoes. But even better is the way Davis has arranged all the characters around him, the way the jumping guy’s arm joins with the guy
See full article at MUBI »

San Sebastián Review: ‘The Motive’ is a Smart Spanish Comedy

Writer’s block as a theme has given us subversive movies like Barton Fink and Adaptation, films that visualize creative impasse through contorted narratives and stylized cinema. The Motive (El Autor), a smart Spanish comedy from director Manuel Martín Cuenca, doesn’t get close in quality to those stand-out films, but in echoing Deconstructing Harry or Charlie Kaufman’s Synecdoche, New York, it deftly shows that the dividing line between fact and fiction has always been blurred.

Javier Gutiérrez is Álvaro, a notary in the southern Spanish city of Seville and a wannabe novelist who elevates his hum-drum life for years at a creative writing evening class where his amateurish writing is given short shrift by his irascible tutor (a great Antonio de la Torre).

His life is quickly overturned when his wife Amanda’s (Maríá León) debut novel becomes an overnight hit on the best-seller lists, and his ambitions
See full article at The Film Stage »

Kirstie Alley to Play Key Role in Scream Queens Season 2

  • DailyDead
Kirstie Alley has joined the Scream Queens Season 2 cast! While details on her role are currently unknown, there's just one more week to go before all will be revealed.

Press Release (via TheFutonCritic.com): Emmy And Golden Globe Award Winner Kirstie Alley Joins The Cast Of "Scream Queens" On Fox.

Series Hails From Creators, Executive Producers and Directors Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, and Ian Brennan.

Jamie Lee Curtis, Emma Roberts, Lea Michele, Abigail Breslin, Keke Palmer, Billie Lourd, Glen Powell, and Niecy Nash Reprise Season One Roles; John Stamos, Taylor Lautner and James Earl Join Season Two as Series Regulars.

Second Season of Series to Premiere Next Tuesday, September 20th, on Fox.

Emmy and Golden Globe Award winner Kirstie Alley has been cast in a series regular role in the upcoming second season of Scream Queens, the comedy-horror series from award-winning executive producers Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, and Ian Brennan.
See full article at DailyDead »

Avq&A: What’s the best version of Satan in pop culture?

  • The AV Club
Welcome back to Avq&A, where we throw out a question for discussion among the staff and readers. Consider this a prompt to compare notes on your interface with pop culture, to reveal your embarrassing tastes and experiences, and to ponder how our diverse lives all led us to convene here together. Got a question you’d like us and the readers to answer? Email us at avcqa@theonion.com.

This week’s question comes from commenter DrDischord:

Who’s your favorite devil? The gay, emotionally needy Satan of South Park? The Bowie-esque king of hell from the Sandman comics? Billy Crystal in Deconstructing Harry?

Nick Wanserski

What makes Beelzebot, the robot devil from Futurama, so great is how often he fails at embodying the most notable traits of either robot or devil. As the devil, he attempts cunning, but is also easily duped. As a robot, he’s emotional
See full article at The AV Club »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Woody Allen’s ‘Café Society,’ Starring Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg, Will Open Cannes 2016

As the rumors swirl when it comes to the line-up for the 69th Cannes Film Festival, today brings confirmation of one specific title. The festival announced today that Woody Allen‘s latest feature Café Society — which Amazon Studios is expected to release this summer — will open the event as an out-of-competition title, marking the third time one of his films has done so.

Led by Kristen Stewart (who we expect to also show up with Olivier Assayas‘ Personal Shopper) and Jesse Eisenberg, the announcement also comes with an official logline (following last week’s details from cinematographer Vittorio Storaro) and the first still, seen above. Check out the press release below in full and return for our review.

The 69th Festival International du Film de Cannes will launch with a screening of Woody Allen’s new film, Café Society, on Wednesday 11 May in the Palais des Festivals’s Grand Théâtre
See full article at The Film Stage »

10 hilarious movie monologues by female characters

  • Hitfix
10 hilarious movie monologues by female characters
I miss hilarious monologues. Comedy of the 21st century is a science of awkward pauses and ratatat dialogue, and thus the great tradition of cinematic monologuing has been largely resigned to dramas. Worse, it's usually only male characters whose rants are lionized; Al Pacino in "Dog Day Afternoon" or Alec Baldwin in "Glengarry Glen Ross" spring immediately to mind when I think of celebrated speechifying.  So today I'm toasting the opposite of those dead-serious, dude-driven monologues: These are 10 hilarious monologues by actresses. Enjoy. And then enjoy again.  1. Madeline Kahn, "Paper Moon" Trixie Delight just wants to get in the car and have a little fun, but Addie here is holding out. Using some coaxing and a little bit of frustration, Trixie prevails. It is basically ridiculous that we watch movies without Madeline Kahn in them. 2. Alicia Silverstone, "Clueless" Leave it to Cher Horowitz to perfectly understand violence in the media.
See full article at Hitfix »

‘Straight Outta Compton’ Producer Matt Alvarez Joins Broad Green

Broad Green Pictures has signed “Straight Outta Compton” producer Matt Alvarez to join its development and production team in an exclusive pact.

Alvarez will serve as an in-house producer for two-year-old Broad Green, which has been seeking to broaden its slate and move into mainstream wide-release projects.

An informed source said Alvarez has resigned from his post at Relativity Studios, where he was named last year as exec VP of production and president its multicultural division, and that Relativity is seeking a replacement.

Straight Outta Compton” has been an outsized hit for Universal with $161 million in U.S. grosses. Alvarez has also produced the “Friday,” “Barbershop,” “Are We There Yet?” and “Ride Along” series, as well as “All About the Benjamins” and “First Sunday.”

“We have long admired Matt’s movies and incredible eye for material, and we are thrilled to partner with him,” said Gabriel Hammond, CEO of Broad Green Pictures,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Goosebumps review – Jack Black's a hoot as horror writer Rl Stine

The Goosebumps author turns up as a creepy weirdo in this spine-tingling romp full of villains from his bestselling novels

Creators have been mixing it up with their characters for a while. You can see it in Fellini’s 8½, Woody Allen’s Deconstructing Harry, or, heck, the Warner Bros cartoon Duck Amuck. Then there are the times when it’s not an author character showing up, but the actual author, such as Stephen King in The Dark Tower or Kurt Vonnegut in Breakfast of Champions. Somewhere in between is Charlie Kaufman writing the character Charlie Kaufman for Nicolas Cage to play in Adaptation.

Now this mind-scrambling list needs to find a place for Larry Karaszewski and Scott Alexander’s character Rl Stine – based on the actual creator of the popular Goosebumps novels – who encounters many Goosebumps villains in the new movie called Goosebumps.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

WestEnd Adds ‘Match Point,’ ‘Scoop’ to Woody Allen Collection (Exclusive)

WestEnd Adds ‘Match Point,’ ‘Scoop’ to Woody Allen Collection (Exclusive)
Cannes — Global sales and financing house WestEnd Films has acquired international rights to Woody Allen’s “Match Point” and “Scoop,” which further strengthens the company’s collection of Woody Allen films.

WestEnd already holds the rights to 10 Allen movies, including “Everyone Says I Love You,” “Sweet and Lowdown,” “Deconstructing Harry” and “Small Time Crooks.” The films topline such stars as Leonardo DiCaprio, Julia Roberts, Sean Penn, Robin Williams, Billy Crystal and Hugh Grant.

2005 movie “Match Point,” which stars Brian Cox, Matthew Goode, Scarlett Johansson, Emily Mortimer, Jonathan Rhys Meyers and Penelope Wilton, was nominated for an Oscar in 2006 for original screenplay. 2006 film “Scoop” stars Allen, Hugh Jackman, Johansson and Ian McShane.

Woody Allen’s ‘Scoop’ stars Scarlett Johansson, Hugh Jackman

WestEnd was co-founded by Eve Schoukroun, Maya Amsellem and Sharon Harel-Cohen, the founder of Capitol Films. Its line-up includes “Shepherds and Butchers” by Oliver Schmitz, starring Steve Coogan and Andrea Riseborough,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Woody Allen and the women in his work

The director is much criticised for his portrayal of women but there’s no denying that, from Annie to Jasmine, he has written great, Oscar-winning female roles – mainly when they are versions of him

Woody’s women arrive behind the director in a big bustling caravan – a noisy train of flakes and nymphs, art snobs, academics and intellectuals, hookers, healers and harpies. Allen’s own nebbish persona aside, women are easily the most recognisable roles to come out of his films: Annie, Hannah, Jasmine. Female actors in his films have won no fewer than six Oscars. At the same time, few directors have drawn as much fire for the typology of female characters they have established onscreen.

“Increasingly, the women in his movies can be divided up between menopausal nuts and coltish sluts,” noted James Wolcott in Vanity Fair in 1998, after Celebrity completed a trio of films, beginning with Mighty Aphrodite,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Grandma’ Review: Lily Tomlin Steers a Poignant, Hilarious Tour de Force

  • The Wrap
‘Grandma’ Review: Lily Tomlin Steers a Poignant, Hilarious Tour de Force
Teen movies have gotten a lot of mileage out of the “24 hours that changed everything” storyline, but it’s a great device for films about older characters as well, whether it’s Ingmar Bergman’s “Wild Strawberries” or Woody Allen’s homage “Deconstructing Harry.” Writer-director Paul Weitz, after a string of duds that includes “Admission” and “American Dreamz,” officially gets his groove back by teaming up with Lily Tomlin on “Grandma,” which allows the actress a rare opportunity to paint with all the colors in her seasoned palette. As Tomlin’s Elle spends a day driving around Los Angeles and catching up with friends.
See full article at The Wrap »

Tony Sirico Joins Woody Allen’s Latest; Meagen Fay Tunes Up For ‘La La Land’

Tony Sirico Joins Woody Allen’s Latest; Meagen Fay Tunes Up For ‘La La Land’
Tony Sirico has strong-armed his way into the next Woody Allen picture. The actor who menaced as “Paulie Walnuts” Gualtieri on The Sopranos will play Vito in Allen’s untitled feature, which is being kept under wraps but also stars Parker Posey, Blake Lively, Kristen Stewart, Jesse Eisenberg, Bruce Willis and others. Sirico also appeared in Allen’s pre-Sopranos films Deconstructing Harry, Everyone Says I Love You and Bullets Over Broadway. Recent credits include Touched, Fr…
See full article at Deadline »

Only Featured Black Actress in a Woody Allen Film Defends His All-White Casts (Q&A)

Only Featured Black Actress in a Woody Allen Film Defends His All-White Casts (Q&A)
This week, Woody Allen unveiled the cast of his next untitled movie: Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart, Bruce Willis and Blake Lively will head up the ensemble, which is striking, though unsurprising, in its starriness — and also in its lack of diversity. The writer-director last year told The New York Observer: "I cast only what's right for the part. Race, friendship means nothing to me except who is right for the part." To this day, Hazelle Goodman is the sole black actress to land a significant role in an Allen film, playing the quirky prostitute Cookie in 1997's Deconstructing Harry.

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Watch: Clip from Woody Allen's 'Irrational Man' as Cannes Reviews Arrive

I was supposed to have seen Woody Allen's new movie Irrational Man a day before it screened at the Cannes Film Festival, giving me a chance to review it the same time as the Cannes crowd, but that review was swiftly canceled and perhaps the reviews out of the fest suggest why. Over at Variety, Scott Foundas calls it one of Allen's "more offbeat and ambitiously weird projects since the fragmented Deconstructing Harry in 1997, though less conventionally entertaining than recent home runs like Blue Jasmine and Midnight in Paris." At The Playlist, Jessica Kiang savages the film concluding her review writing, "As an unyielding, deeply fond fan of many of Allen's earlier films, some of which have combined homicide and humor to far, far, far greater effect, it gives me no pleasure to ask the question that buzzed through my brain at the end of Irrational Man: how
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Daily | Cannes 2015 | Woody Allen’s Irrational Man

Woody Allen's Irrational Man with Joaquin Phoenix, Emma Stone and Parker Posey, has premiered Out of Competition in Cannes and has been met with mixed reviews. Screen calls it a "modestly appointed but fiercely intellectual thriller," but for the Playlist, it's "an embarrassment." Variety calls it "one of the Woodman’s more offbeat and ambitiously weird projects since the fragmented Deconstructing Harry in 1997, though less conventionally entertaining than recent home runs like Blue Jasmine and Midnight in Paris." We've got more reviews and, of course, the trailer. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Cannes 2015 | Woody Allen’s Irrational Man

Woody Allen's Irrational Man with Joaquin Phoenix, Emma Stone and Parker Posey, has premiered Out of Competition in Cannes and has been met with mixed reviews. Screen calls it a "modestly appointed but fiercely intellectual thriller," but for the Playlist, it's "an embarrassment." Variety calls it "one of the Woodman’s more offbeat and ambitiously weird projects since the fragmented Deconstructing Harry in 1997, though less conventionally entertaining than recent home runs like Blue Jasmine and Midnight in Paris." We've got more reviews and, of course, the trailer. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Irrational Man’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Irrational Man’
After Alfred Hitchcock and his Gallic disciple, Claude Chabrol, has any filmmaker devoted more screen time to contemplating the mechanics of the “perfect” murder than Woody Allen? Allen’s latest, “Irrational Man,” adds to a tally that also includes “Crimes and Misdemeanors,” “Match Point” and the little-seen “Cassandra’s Dream” — only, unlike those films’ homicidal protagonists, the philosophical anti-hero of Allen’s 45th feature kills not for love or money, but rather for a kind of existential clarity. That conceit puts a fresh spin on a familiar premise and marks “Irrational Man” as one of the Woodman’s more offbeat and ambitiously weird projects since the fragmented “Deconstructing Harry” in 1997, though less conventionally entertaining than recent home runs like “Blue Jasmine” and “Midnight in Paris.” Arthouse traffic should be decent but modest for the July 17 Sony Classics release.

In a role that suits his laconic, rum-soaked rhythms nearly as well
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jack Black Plays Too Nice but Offers One Great Surprise in The D Train

One of the most inspired ideas in late-middle Woody Allen pictures comes in Deconstructing Harry, a movie about how Allen loves Bergman, hates Philip Roth, and isn't quite clear on what “deconstruction” means. Allen stages passages from fiction written by the protagonist, a novelist named Harry; one features Robin Williams as a screen actor who, in his real life, has gone out of focus. He's no use on set, as the camera can't film him, and at home his wife, played by Julie Kavner, can only suggest he go lie down.

Sometimes, in other movies, when Williams himself dialed back and attempted to portray some likable everyman, he, too, seemed to blur a bit, radiating vague sincerity and niceness but not always suggesting an actual human being. Now, in The D...
See full article at Village Voice »
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