Ceux qui m'aiment prendront le train
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Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train (1998) More at IMDbPro »Ceux qui m'aiment prendront le train (original title)


2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009

11 items from 2013


Toh! Remembers Talent the Film Community Lost in 2013 (Part 1)

23 December 2013 8:00 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As Part 1 in our series of "Toh! Remembers" posts, we look back at some of the talent the film community lost in 2013. Who: Ray Harryhausen Born: June 29, 1920Known for: Pioneering work as creator of stop-motion special effectsCareer breakout: “Mighty Joe Young”High Point: The sword-fight of the skeletons in “Jason and the Argonauts”Low Point: CGIYes, it's true: Was referenced in the song “Worried About Ray’ by The Hoosiers. --John AndersonWho: Patrice Chéreau Born: 1944Known for: Prolific opera, theater, and movie director, who also actedCareer breakout: Appointed director of suburban Parisian theater at age of 22High point: In film, "La Reine Margot" ("Queen Margot") awarded the Jury Prize and Best Actress Award (for Virna Lisi) in Cannes in 1994, as well as three Cesar nominations; won Cesar for Best Director, "Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train," 1998.Low point: His now-beloved Marxist production of the Ring cycle at Bayreuth was booed at. »

- TOH!

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The Noteworthy: Patrice Chéreau (1944-2013), Viff, "The Spirit of the Forms"

8 October 2013 4:18 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

News.

Opera and theatre director, filmmaker, and actor Patrice Chéreau has passed away at the age of 68. From David Hudson's Daily:

"In 2001, Chéreau’s Intimacy won the Berlinale’s Golden Bear and the prestigious Prix Louis Delluc, and two years later, he won a Silver Bear for Best Director for Son frère. At Cannes, he won the Jury Prize in 1994 for La reine Margot (Queen Margo, with Isabelle Adjani), then a César for Best Director in 1998 for Ceux qui m’aiment prendront le train (Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train, with Pascal Greggory, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Charles Berling, Jean-Louis Trintignant, and on and on)."

Via Variety, Bong Joon-ho hinted publicly that he's not too happy with The Weinstein Company and the cuts Snowpiercer has had to undergo for its North American release. Jonathan Rosenbaum has found a new (internet) home: follow him to jonathanrosenbaum.net.

Finds.

For the Vancouver International Film Festival, »

- Adam Cook

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Patrice Chéreau obituary

8 October 2013 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Film, opera and stage director known for La Reine Margot and his Ring cycle at Bayreuth in 1976

Unusually for a director, Patrice Chéreau, who has died of lung cancer aged 68, had more or less equally prestigious careers in the theatre, cinema and opera. Although he was internationally known from films such as La Reine Margot (1994) and his groundbreaking production of Richard Wagner's Ring cycle at Bayreuth (1976), he was renowned in his native France mostly for his "must-see" stage productions, especially during his long stints as co-director of the Théâtre National Populaire (1971-77) and the Théâtre des Amandiers (1982-90).

At these two subsidised theatres, in Villeurbanne, near Lyons, and Nanterre, in western Paris, respectively, Chéreau was able to introduce modern plays and bring a freshness to bear on the classics, particularly Marivaux, whose La Dispute he directed to acclaim at the Tnp in three different versions in the 1970s. At the Amandiers, »

- Ronald Bergan

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Patrice Chéreau: a director genuinely devoted to his art | Stephen Moss

8 October 2013 8:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Witty, urbane and indefatigable to the last, Chéreau was one of the great directors of the past 40 years, a man whose creative integrity was his professional hallmark

The last time I met the French director Patrice Chéreau, who died on Monday at the age of 68, he had already been diagnosed with cancer. It was in Berlin last April; he looked tired and his hair was thinning. But he refused to stint, either on rehearsals for a production of Elektra at the Aix-en-Provence festival on which he was engaged, or on his mentoring of the young Polish director Michał Borczuch for a programme run by the Rolex Mentors Initiative.

At the end of the week in Berlin, he attended a dinner for eight people, where he was the centre of attention. He was witty and nostalgic – reminiscing about trips he made to the seaside with his parents as a boy – and full of life and plans. »

- Stephen Moss

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Patrice Chéreau dies aged 68

8 October 2013 3:32 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The visionary French director, whose Bayreuth Ring cycle left an indelible mark on modern opera, has died of lung cancer

Patrice Chéreau, the acclaimed French stage and screen director, has died of lung cancer at the age of 68.

The director is perhaps best known for his films, but was widely credited as a theatrical visionary. He arguably changed the face of modern opera with his legendary production of Richard Wagner's Ring cycle at the Bayreuth festival.

Staged over four years from 1976, Chéreau's epic production – set against the industrial revolution – marked the opera's centenary. On its final performance in 1980, the show received a 45-minute ovation.

Appointed as artistic director of the Théâtre de Sartrouville in north Paris at the age of 22, Chéreau went on to become of France's great cultural figures. Several of his productions played at the Avignon festival, with his 1988 Hamlet headlining the festival from the Cour d'honneur. »

- Matt Trueman

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French Director Patrice Chereau Dies at 68

7 October 2013 11:39 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Cannes – Groundbreaking French director Patrice Chereau, acclaimed for his work on both stage and screen, died Monday night after a battle with lung cancer. He was 68. He is perhaps best known in the U.S. for the Oscar-nominated Queen Margot, starring Isabel Adjani and Daniel Auteuil, which took home the jury prize at Cannes and a handful of Cesar Awards in 1994. He made ten films over his long career, including the English-language Intimacy, which took the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival in 2001; Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train, which earned

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- Rhonda Richford

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French Director Known for His Movies with Adjani and Huppert, and for Several Gay-Related Dramas Has Died

7 October 2013 6:06 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Patrice Chéreau dead at 68: French director best known for ‘Queen Margot,’ gay-related dramas (photo: Patrice Chéreau; Isabelle Adjani in ‘Queen Margot’) Screenwriter, sometime actor, and stage, opera, and film director Patrice Chéreau, whose clinically cool — some might say sterile — films were arthouse favorites in some quarters, has died of lung cancer in Paris. Chéreau was 68. Born on November 2, 1944, in Lézigné, in France’s Maine-et-Loire department, and raised in Paris, Patrice Chéreau began directing plays in his late teens. In the mid-’60s, he became the director of a theater in Sartrouville, northwest of Paris, where he staged plays with a strong left-wing bent. Later on he moved to Milan’s Piccolo Teatro, and in the ’80s became the director of the Théâtre des Amandiers in the Parisian suburb of Nanterre. His 1976 staging of Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen in the Bavarian town of Bayreuth was considered revolutionary. Patrice Chéreau »

- Andre Soares

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French Helmer Patrice Chereau Dies at 68

7 October 2013 2:22 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Patrice Chereau, the French director of opera, theater and films such as “Queen Margot” and “Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train,” died Monday in Paris of lung cancer. He was 68.

A screenwriter and actor as well, Chereau was director of the Theatre des Amandiers in Nanterre, France. His unusual production of “The Ring” in Bayreuth in 1976 was described as changing the face of modern opera.

Equally at home in theater, opera and film, he told the Guardian in 2011, “For me they are exactly the same – telling stories with actors.”

Queen Margot,” starring Isabelle Adjani, received two Cannes Film Festival prizes in 1994 and was Oscar-nommed for costume design. The Cannes Film Festival screened a restored version of the film this year.

In 2001, Chereau helmed his only English-language film, the sexually-explicit “Intimacy,” written by Hanif Kureishi, which won the Berlin Golden Bear award. But though he spend seven years trying »

- Pat Saperstein

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Patrice Chereau dies aged 68

7 October 2013 1:17 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Patrice Chereau, the French director of La Reine Margot whose talents spanned opera, film and theatre, has died in Paris following a battle with lung cancer. He was 68.

Chereau directed 10 films during a distinguished career that included Intimacy, Son Frere and Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train.

Of all his films, the one that will perhaps be remembered most vividly is 1994’s La Reine Margot, the 16th century historical potboiler based on the Alexandre Dumas novel and that starred Isabel Adjani, Vincent Perez and Daniel Auteuil.

His crowning achievement in opera was his 1976 staging of Wagner’s Ring Cycle at the Bayreuth opera festival.

Elisabeth Tanner, co-director of the Artmedia agency that represented Chereau, confirmed his death and told Afp: “He had an extraordinary vitality right until the end.” »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Patrice Chereau, 1944-2013

7 October 2013 1:17 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Patrice Chereau, the French director of La Reine Margot whose talents spanned opera, film and theatre, has died in Paris following a battle with lung cancer. He was 68.Chereau directed 10 films during a distinguished career that included Intimacy, Son Frere and Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train.Of all his films, the one that will perhaps be remembered most vividly is 1994’s La Reine Margot, the 19th century historical potboiler based on the

Patrice Chereau, the French director of La Reine Margot whose talents spanned opera, film and theatre, has died in Paris following a battle with lung cancer. He was 68.

Chereau directed 10 films during a distinguished career that included Intimacy, Son Frere and Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train.

Of all his films, the one that will perhaps be remembered most vividly is 1994’s La Reine Margot, the 19th century historical potboiler based on the Alexandre Dumas novel and that starred Isabel »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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It Happened in Saint Tropez | Colcoa Review

18 April 2013 8:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Those Who Love Me Can Catch the Train Wreck: Thompson’s Latest Flat, Overstuffed

Familial relationships and transportation, two favorite themes of writer/director Daniele Thompson, figure heavily in her latest feature, It Happened in Saint Tropez, a breezy situational comedy that suffers from a hokey forced charm, beginning with its misleading English title translation (the original title, Des gens qui s’embrassent should be something along the lines of People Who Embrace). A cousin in tone to something like Anne Fontaine’s 2009 bauble headed The Girl From Monaco, it unfortunately fails to match the effervescent enchantment of some of Thompson’s past titles, like her lovely 2006 film, Avenue Montaigne.

Noga (Lou de Laage) is a young cellist living in New York with her intense musician parents, Irene (Valerie Bonneton) and Zef (Eric Elmosnino). Familial drama rears its head in their isolated universe by the upcoming wedding of Zef’s »

- Nicholas Bell

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2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009

11 items from 2013


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