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Bulworth (1998) Poster

(1998)

Trivia

Jump to: Cameo (5) | Spoilers (1)
Warren Beatty held a private screening of this film for Professor Cornel West. Beatty was unsure if he wanted to release the film and asked West's opinion. West praised the film and told Beatty that it needed to be seen.
Aaron Sorkin and James Toback did a great deal of uncredited work on the script.
Co-screenwriter Warren Beatty was described by writing partner Jeremy Pikser and biographer Peter Biskind as so insecure about his script that he went to former collaborator Elaine May with the script. She told him it wasn't any good but Beatty suspected that because May was writing the script to a rival political satire, Primary Colors (1998), that she was looking out for her own interests.
Filmed entirely on Steadicam with the exception of the opening sequence.
Co-screenwriter Jeremy Pikser described the experience of working with Warren Beatty as frustrating. He was paid by the studio a lump sum per each draft produced and Beatty spent months working and reworking a single draft. Tired of being away from his family, Beatty's ego and the lack of pay, Pikser left the L.A. office where he and Beatty were writing the script to return to his family in L.A. The two finished the rest of the process via telephone and fax.
President Barack Obama, according to a 15th May 2013 article in The New York Times by Peter Baker entitled "Onset of Woes Casts Pall Over Obama's Policy Aspirations", once referred to this film, reportedly when Obama talked about "Going Bulworth". The piece states: "Yet Mr. Obama also expresses exasperation. In private, he has talked longingly of 'going Bulworth', a reference to a little-remembered 1998 'Warren Beatty' movie about a senator who risked it all to say what he really thought. While Mr. Beatty's character had neither the power nor the platform of a president, the metaphor highlights Mr. Obama's desire to be liberated from what he sees as the hindrances on him."
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The film was Oscar nominated for the Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen Academy Award in 1999 for Jeremy Pikser (screenplay) and Warren Beatty (story/screenplay) but lost out to Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard for Shakespeare in Love (1998).
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Oliver Platt wears a tie with Eagles on it. This is the official school tie from Eaglebrook School, the middle school he attended.
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The name of the political party that Senator Jay Billington Bulworth (Warren Beatty) was a member of was the Democratic Party.
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Final theatrical feature film directed by Warren Beatty for around eighteen years until Rules Don't Apply (2016).
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Warren Beatty performed a number of roles on this picture. Beatty was the movie's director, a producer, co-screenwriter, lead actor, and top-billed star.
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Third and final of three cinema movie collaborations of actor Jack Warden and actor-writer-producer-director Warren Beatty. The first was Shampoo (1975) and then the second was around three years later with Heaven Can Wait (1978). These two 1970s films brought Warden to the peak of his acting career as he displayed a flair for comedy in both Shampoo (1975) and Heaven Can Wait (1978). As the faintly sinister businessman "Lester" in Shampoo (1975) and as the perpetually befuddled football trainer "Max Corkle" in Heaven Can Wait (1978), Warden received Academy Award nominations as Best Supporting Actor for both pictures but did not win the Oscar for either movie. Finally, Warden then later appeared in Beatty's Bulworth (1998) around twenty years after Heaven Can Wait (1978), portraying the character of "Eddie Davers".
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The movie's hip-hop soundtrack went platinum, receiving RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) certification for this, and selling in total over one million copies.
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The film was nominated in the American Film Institute's list of 500 movies nominated for the top 100 Funniest American Movies in their "100 Years . . . 100 Laughs" Top 100 List.
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Actor Oliver Platt would go on to appear in such other politically themed films as Frost/Nixon (2008) and Kill the Messenger (2014).
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Actors Warren Beatty and Paul Sorvino have both also appeared in Reds (1981), Dick Tracy (1990), and Rules Don't Apply (2016), which are all films directed by Beatty. As such, of the five cinema movies that Beatty has directed, Sorvino has appeared in all except Heaven Can Wait (1978).
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The film's closing credits dedication declares that this picture is dedicated: "For A.B., K.E.B.B., B.M.B., and I.I.A.B.".
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The movie was nominated for a Best Screenplay Academy Award in the same year as another political satire, Mike Nichols' Primary Colors (1998) which was nominated in the Best Screenplay Adaptation category whereas Bulworth (1998) was nominated in the Best Original Screenplay category. Both political satire pictures did not win.
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First theatrical feature film directed by Warren Beatty since Dick Tracy (1990) which was a gap of around eight years.
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Fourth theatrical feature film directed by Warren Beatty. The first three were [in order]: Heaven Can Wait (1978), Reds (1981), and Dick Tracy (1990). The fifth would be Rules Don't Apply (2016) [not including the tele-movie Dick Tracy Special (2010)].
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Halle Berry and Isaiah Washington had both previously worked with Spike Lee, on Jungle Fever (1991) and Girl 6 (1996) respectively. Berry had also actually ironically also previously starred in a movie called Losing Isaiah (1995).
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Portraying Constance Bulworth, the wife of Senator Jay Billington Bulworth (Warren Beatty), actress Christine Baranski would later play around six years later a fictional Former First Lady in another political satire, in the political comedy Welcome to Mooseport (2004), playing Charlotte Cole, the ex-wife of former U.S. President Monroe Cole (Gene Hackman).
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The film was made and released during the Democrat Presidency of Democrat President Bill Clinton (1993-2001). Warren Beatty's Senator Jay Billington Bulworth character is a progressive liberal Democrat.
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Notable American politicians, government administrators, and political figures referred and/or featured in the film included Democrat President Bill Clinton, Democrat Vic-President Al Gore, Bob Dole, Ross Perot, Newt Gingrich, Pat Buchanan, Alan Simpson, Democratic New Jersey Senator Bill Bradley (1979-1997), Colin Powell, Clint Eastwood, George Bush, Huey P. Newton, Robert F. Kennedy, Democrat President John F. Kennedy, and Martin Luther King.
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One of two theatrical feature films of the 1990s directed by Warren Beatty, the only decade where Beatty has directed two cinema movies, the most directed by Beatty for any decade. The other picture was at the start, Dick Tracy (1990), whereas Bulworth (1998) was made and released towards the end of this era.
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Warren Beatty, Oliver Platt, Paul Sorvino, Joshua Malina, and Graham Beckel all also appeared in the later Warren Beatty directed film Rules Don't Apply (2016)
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Star Warren Beatty previously starred in director Alan J. Pakula's political conspiracy picture The Parallax View (1974) which had been made and released around twenty-four years earlier.
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The movie won the 1998 (LAFCA) (Los Angeles Film Critics Association) Best Screenplay Award awarded to the movie's screenwriters, Jeremy Pikser and Warren Beatty, the latter of whom is also credited for the film's story.
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Fourth consecutive film directed by Warren Beatty to be Oscar nominated for at least one Academy Award after Heaven Can Wait (1978), Reds (1981), and Dick Tracy (1990).
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First Oscar nominated film directed by Warren Beatty not to win an Academy Award. Heaven Can Wait (1978), Reds (1981), and Dick Tracy (1990) all won Oscars, the tallies of gongs won being won being one, three, and three respectively.
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The value of the life insurance policy that Senator Jay Billington Bulworth (Warren Beatty) took out was US $10 million.
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Star Warren Beatty's first acting role in a theatrical feature film since Love Affair (1994) around four years earlier.
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Star Warren Beatty's last acting role in a theatrical feature film until Town & Country (2001) around three years later.
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The middle-name of Senator Jay Bulworth (Warren Beatty) was "Billington".
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The name of the rap track performed by Mya and Ol' Dirty Bastard which was released as a tie-in with the movie was "Ghetto Superstar".
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There was a sequel in development named, "Bulworth 2000", satirising the 2000 Presidential Election, that was cancelled.
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Around ten years earlier, actress 'Nora Dunn' and actor Oliver Platt had both appeared in Working Girl (1988).
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The name of the American state in the USA that Senator Jay Bulworth (Warren Beatty) represented was "California".
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The phrase that is repeated a number of times early on in the movie was: "We stand at the doorstep of a new millennium".
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The phrase description that Senator Jay Bulworth (Warren Beatty) used to represent the activity of getting himself assassinated was: "The weekend research project".
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Cameo 

George Hamilton: Uncredited, as himself / George Hamilton. Before he is briefly seen in the movie, he is foreshadowed in the film's script by being referenced at one point in the movie's dialogue.
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Larry King: As himself.
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William Baldwin: Uncredited, as the lover of Senator Bulworth (Warren Beatty)'s wife Constance Bulworth Christine Baranski).
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Paul Mazursky: Uncredited, the director as himself / Paul Mazursky.
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Michael Clarke Duncan: As a Bouncer, and billed as Michael 'Big Mike' Duncan.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

The f-word and/or its derivatives are used 111 times.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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