The Big Lebowski (1998) Poster

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10/10
The film with the highest rewatchability factor of all time
gogoschka-13 November 2015
It's actually kind of hard to describe this movie (and what's so great about it) to people who don't already know it and love it; as with many cult films, The Big Lebowski will either speak to you (in which case you will become a fervent follower of His Dudeness and abide by his code for the rest of your life) or, if it doesn't, the film will either leave you completely indifferent or you'll even downright hate it.

I believe it's a very funny film and I'm sure it can be rightfully called a comedy, but don't expect punchlines, gags, jokes or slapstick - it's not that kind of comedy. If you want to enjoy this film, you have to meet Jeffery "The Dude" Lebowski by his terms, hang out with him and his bowling buddies and follow them at a their (perhaps somewhat leisurely) pace through this weird and unbelievable tale about nihilism, theft (of a car and, more importantly: a Creedence Clearwater Revival tape), kidnapping, abstract art, porn and - of course - bowling.

The story is actually kind of simple. You see, some no-good German nihilists urinated on The Dude's rug - and this kind of aggression just won't stand against The Dude. With the help of his bowling buddies, he will do everything in his power to get someone to pay for his rug - or possibly get a new one (because that rug really tied the room together). So he embarks on this worthy quest during which he will encounter many wondrous things and fascinating people (even Jesus - who is NOT the messiah but a very naughty man).

With Jeff Bridges in the leading role, the Coen brothers have found the perfect actor to incorporate one of the most iconic characters that has ever been created. But it's not just The Dude that makes this a winner; the whole film is such an inspired folly and simply inventive filmmaking at its finest (the hilarious dream sequence alone is worth the price of admission). The supporting cast is outstanding (J.Turturro, J.Goodman and S.Buscemi among many others), the song choices are perfect and the dialog is the funniest, most quotable in any comedy I've ever seen. This - for me - is without a doubt the film with the highest rewatchability factor of all time. 10 stars out of 10.

Favorite Films: http://www.imdb.com/list/ls054200841/

Lesser-known Masterpieces: http://www.imdb.com/list/ls070242495/

Favorite Low-Budget and B-movies: http://www.imdb.com/list/ls054808375/
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10/10
You can watch it a million times, and yet, it will never get old
cleaf28 March 2004
The Big Lebowski is the type of movie that is so funny, and so clever, you want nothing more but to meet the Coen brothers, congratulate them personally for their unique talent, and get inside their heads and find out what makes these two geniuses "tick". The main characters are Jeff Bridges (who plays such broad roles like The Muse, The Contender, and Sea Biscuit), John Goodman (who should have won an oscar for best supporting actor for his character, Walter Sobchak)Juliane Moore (Maude Lebowski)and Steve Buscemi (who is unique in every Coen Brother movie).

The first time I saw this movie, I will admit that I enjoyed it, but did not fully appreciate its level of humor and raw talent. I thought the middle section was a bit too depressing and long. But trust me, this is a movie that gets more funny every time you see it, even if it's your thousandth time seeing it. Its level of comedy, action, brutality, and vulgarity become that much more evident and important.

The characters are brilliantly written by the coen brothers, and, likewise, are brilliantly portrayed by the actors. The Big Lebowski is like no other film. It will make you laugh and it will make you cry. There is no other film such as TBL that is sharp and witty all the way through. One of the Joel and Ethan Coen's best, and one of the movie industry's best comedic film of all time. You want to go see this flick.
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Simply Beautiful
butterfinger16 October 2004
It's a travesty that most critics only read The Big Lebowski at its most superficial level and called it a modern take on a Raymond Chandler potboiler. I simply can't begin to perceive how one could sit down in front of this cinematic pop-poetry, as it plates gold on the silver screen, and not feel so incredibly alive. The dream sequence Busbee Berkley musical numbers are unique and awe-inspiring; the humor is rich, subtle, and clever in the way it satirizes politically correct arrogance; the free-flowing story avoids (even pokes fun at) nonessentials like plot points and pay-offs. But what really makes this film such a masterpiece, such a panacea, is the incredible humanism, the care that the Coen brothers put in developing The Dude (Jeff Bridges), Walter (John Goodman), Donnie (Steve Buscemi-tremendously endearing), and Brandt (magnificently played by Phillip Seymour Hoffman). Looking at the films use of Sam Elliott to play The Stranger, who constantly rambles about the many wonders of The Dude (among other things), it is clear that the film is an ode to a Dudist way of life. And in a time where so many film promise that they have the answer to the worlds problems and end up as slick, stylistic show-off films, what more could one ask for than a good-hearted film like this? Not to mention the performance by Jeff Bridges, which ranks among the best performances of the nineties; he has a relaxed slouch, a goofy smile, an enthusiastic dance, and his buttons can only be pushed by Walter, who John Goodman plays with charm and fury. The Coen brothers have always been considered 'cold' filmmakers, but there is nothing here but warmth and humanity (as is the case with the Coens' Fargo). What we have here is one of the greatest achievements in modern cinema and if you can't see that, grab a White Russian, hit the bowling ally, and find your inner-Dude as soon as possible.
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My favourite Coen brothers movie and one of the most entertaining and original comedies ever made!
Infofreak27 December 2002
My favourite Coen brothers movie changes over the years as I watch and rewatch their amazingly original and consistently surprising oeuvre. When I first saw 'The Big Lebowski' on its original release I enjoyed it but thought it was a bit of a slight "fun" movie with less depth than many of their previous works. Now, a few years and several viewing later, I have come to realise just how accomplished a movie it is, and it has become one of my all time favourite movies. Other film makers have attempted to weave together various genres, styles and images in a similarly eclectic, postmodern fashion, but few do it as seamlessly and with such wit as Ethan and Joel Coen. 'The Big Lewboski' is an extremely smart film, but it doesn't shout "look at me! Aren't I clever?". It sucks you in from the get go, and bottom line it is FUNNY, and as it is a comedy that's what counts the most! Everything about the movie is perfect, the script, the direction, set design, costumes, and the wonderful soundtrack (one of the most brilliant ever assembled, it includes lesser known Dylan and Elvis Costello numbers, Creedence classics, and songs from cult favourites like Yma Sumac, Captain Beefheart, Moondog, Esquivel and garage gods The Monks). Plus of course the actors, who are well cast and virtually flawless. Jeff Bridges ('Fat City', 'Starman') IS The Dude, and it's impossible to think of anyone else acting the role. Coen regulars John Goodman, Steve Buscemi, John Turturro, Peter Stomare, and Jon Polito are all on board, as well as Julianne Moore ('Boogie Nights'), David Huddleston ('Capricorn One'), Philip Seymour Hoffman ('Magnolia') and Sam Elliot ('Mask'), even surprise cameos from Ben Gazzara ('The Killing Of A Chinese Bookie') and singer Jimmie Ray Gilmore. I can't fault 'The Big Lebowski', it is one of the most original and entertaining comedies ever made and a genuine modern classic. It's movies like this that keep me watching despite the endless mountain of mindless garbage that Hollywood continually spews out. If only every movie in the box office Top Ten was as inspired and amusing as this one!
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10/10
Greatest movie ever made.
rlycar12 December 2004
With the combination of the writing of the Coen brothers and the Cinematography of Roger Deakins, they created a film as beautiful as it is funny. The Coen brothers consistently impress me with their ability to write an interesting story with fascinating yet quirky characters. Without resorting to gratuitous sexual scenes like many other writer/directors of R rated films the Coen brothers manage to add the right amount of language and violence that is necessary to the story without it becoming the only reason for watching. 'The Big Lebowski' has so many clever and hilarious lines that you have to watch it over and over again.

Nothing else needs to be said about it other than it is the greatest movie ever made.
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10/10
The Dude Abides!!!
Coxer9924 February 1999
No movie has entertained me more in the last year than this film. It's delightfully written, directed with poise and acted with extravagance and excellence. I do admit that this is a film that I had to see six times to get. Every time I watch it I learn something new. The genius of the film lies within a game I think the Coen brothers play with their audiences. There are the touches of the masters in many of their films. In "The Hudsucker Proxy," it was Preston Sturges and Frank Capra. In "Raising Arizona," I felt a touch of Sam Fuller. In this film, I felt many touches of greatness, but more specifically I felt John Sayles or even John Cassevettes in spots. The camera was manipulated beautifully and I felt a tinge of their talents lurking in at many a turn. The performances are astounding, especially Goodman as the deranged bowler still living deep within the jungles of the Vietcong. Huddleston is also quite wonderful as the title character. Turturro gives a fine cameo as "Jesus," coupled with a rousing and humurous version of the Eagles, "Hotel California," done in Espanol. I hope this is a film that is looked at with more seriousness. It is, once you dig deep, a fine piece of filmmaking.
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8/10
Coen brothers unabashedly out of control! A plethora of fun!
Ash-3717 August 1998
The Coen brothers are up there with my very favorite filmmakers (Scorsese, Kubrick, Carpenter). I am very fond of their work. Throughout their irreverent career, they have explored different subjects and themes. Their best stories evolve from kidnapping schemes in films like "Raising Arizona " and "Fargo", one of my very favorites. I thought that film was fervently free. I was so ever wrong. It's as if the Coen Brothers have celebrated their complete breakthrough success (Academy Award winners), and now are willing to do whatever they please. "The Big Lebowski" is a film so meandering, so wonderfully novel, that I found myself missing the many other sporadic jokes as I was heaving from laughter. The film is basically about mistaken identity, eccentric characters, and a soiled rug. This film extols the bowler, the allies, even the pins. We experience an actual bowling ball POV, as the Dude (Jeff Bridges) hallucinates. This film has nihilists, feminists, millionares, paedophiles, drugged out hippies, underachieving students, incompetent criminals, pornographers and 'Nam veterans. This movie is open to anything , anything... Some people are turned off by absurd looniness, because it's so grandiosely different. Yet who couldn't chuckle, if not explode, when a bowler dressed in a tight purple suit licks a bowling ball's finger hole, and the camera pans down to reveal his name as Jesus! I will disclose no more, but urgently recommend you to traverse to your nearest video abode and rent this true escapists' feature. Abandon all solemn inhibitons, though! One can not keep a straight face whilst watching.
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2/10
I just don't feel it !
Abdo Hamdy5 January 2017
Warning: Spoilers
Well , It's my first review here , I really couldn't resist .. I just watched the movie because it has a high rating and Julianne Moore . I really was shocked of the film , gave it 2/10 only because of the last scene that I felt some comedy about it . Rest of the movie I saw no comedy at all . The story isn't that powerful and didn't sound interesting enough to me or maybe it could have been done better. I don't know why it has that high rating or what the people liked most about it but everyone has its taste for sure ..

The most boring film that I've ever seen till now .. It's my first time to leave a movie and go to sleep then continue it later ..

As for it's genre ,, It's not mysterious as it looks like , not enough crime and Surely not Comedy ..

I was expecting much more and I am really disappointed about it
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2/10
and kept waiting....
vaquerar5 November 2011
Warning: Spoilers
the title sounded funny. Actors: Julianne Moore, Jeff bridges. OK, at first glance it looked promising. I really thought that I was going to have such a great time watching a comedy movie with great actors.

This movie has the great rating, the prominent actors that I much enjoy watch in many of their great performances... It seemed that it automatically was going to be a great comedy. so, I sat there waiting and waiting for the next great scene that never came up:-( I just felt that I wanted to laugh, but could not... needless to say, I did not get this movie...

all the topics were funny but did not click together: the rug? The same name? The unusual nickname? The kidnapping of the girl? I mean... Jeff bridges and Julianne Moore can do way much better. I would not have waisted my time...
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10/10
The Most Quotable Film of All Time
OttoVonB5 December 2002
Those Coen brothers have an ear for language. You feel it in the sing-songy banalities of Fargo, and in the noiresque machine-gun dialogue of Miller's Crossing, but neither of these can prepare you for the feast for the ears that is The Big Lebowski.

Channeling the opaque mysteries of Raymond Chandler, the Coens throw LA resident bum and Bowling aficionado Jeff Lebowski ("The Dude" to his friends) into a strange triple-crossing case of kidnapping, ransoms, nihilists and urinated-upon rugs. It is the equivalent of throwing unrelenting forces at an immovable object, the Dude's bemused stoicism at constant odds with the world around him. He'd much rather be bowling with crazed Vietnam Vet Walter (John Goodman) and pure silent soul Donnie (Steve Buscemi).

As with so much of the Coens' output, style is more than half the point: not just visual, though ace DP Roger Deakins paints an alluring canvas, but tonal and auditory. This is an insanely funny head-trip of a movie, with wonderfully idiosyncratic characters, down to the smallest part. Who better than the Coens to reinvent the comedy of errors?

This is without a doubt one of their very best, a personal favorite, an unmissable film and the kind of experience that will plant an indelible smile on your face. Do yourself and see this now, if you haven't already.
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That Rug Really Tied the Room Together
track164613 December 2004
Acting is one of the most key elements to success or failure of a film. Some film types can survive without superb acting. These motion pictures can entertain the viewer with special effects or intense action scenes. A film based on heavy dialog and back-story can not survive with out excellent actors. One such movie that meets the dialog-based criterion is The Big Lebowski. The film follows Jeff 'The Dude' Lebowski (Jeff Bridges) and his two close friends through a not so normal chain of events. The story is augmented by the supporting characters Walter (John Goodman) and Donny (Steve Buscemi). Written by Joel and Ethan Coen, the creative forces behind Fargo, the intriguing story succeeds because of the actors' impeccable skill.

As with many other films by the Coen brothers The Big Lebowski is an odd array of out of the ordinary characters slapped right in the middle of an improbable situation. The Dude is an unlikely hero living in the city of Los Angeles who becomes embroiled in a botched kidnapping. This is not the average kidnapper comedy that has been seen a thousand times before. The Coen brothers take a fresh look at an old tired subject. The story they have created is intriguing and entertaining, but the true entertainment comes from the unique characters. Walter, played by John Goodman, is a Vietnam veteran who seems to have some parts of post traumatic stress syndrome. Donny, another one of The Dude's close friends, is a quiet unassuming character who often interjects into conversation, but no one pays close attention to what he says.

As well as these characters are written, they would not be as effective had they been played by other actors. This effectiveness of acting can be seen in the opening scene at the bowling alley where the supporting characters are first introduced. This scene is comprised of Donny, Walter, and The Dude sitting at their lane in the bowling alley discussing the attack on The Dude by some hired thugs (7min 25 sec). The Dude is approaching the situation in his usual lackadaisical way. Jeff Bridges conveys The Dude's overall demeanor in his laid back, sauntering, walk. Although being laid back, Bridges is direct in his speaking showing that The Dude is not the average confused old stoner. Bridges facial expressions during this scene show The Dude is distressed about the loss of his rug which 'tied the room together.'

Donny seems to be an outside observer in this scene and throughout much of the film. Buscemi conveys his character's attention during discussion by following the flow of the conversation with his head. He looks from The Dude to Walter and from Walter to The Dude depending on who is talking. He may seem to be paying attention, but his asking of simple questions dispels this assumption. Another technique Buscemi uses is while he is observing the conversation he furrows his brow as if in deep thought and contemplation. This look of concentration is juxtaposed with the look of confused happiness, an empty smile, Buscemi uses when Donny makes a point in the conversation. These techniques which are introduced by Bridges and Buscemi early in the film are used throughout the entire picture.

Although Bridges and Buscemi do an excellent job of introducing their characters traits to the viewer, Goodman superbly shows his character's inner traits. Throughout the conversation it is apparent due to dialog that Walter is becoming upset. Goodman conveys this anger with facial expressions and body movement. In the early part of the conversation Goodman puts on a stone face to show that Walter is firmly set in his position. The Dude begins to agitate Walter as the conversation continues. Goodman shows this agitation by furrowing his brow, leaning forward while talking, and turning progressively redder. As Goodman continues, his speaking becomes more staccato and flustered. When The Dude refers to one of the attackers as 'the china man,' Walter continues on his tirade momentarily then quietly addresses the non politically correct nature of The Dude's comment. Changing from this aggravated manner of speaking to a more politically correct and lower tone shows that Walter has some sudden mood swings and a short fuse, as he returns to his tirade quickly.

This scene exemplifies the acting skills of John Goodman, Jeff Bridges, and Steve Buscemi. The characters in this story have been given interesting and entertaining dialog by the writers, but it is up to the actors to make the characters exude a certain feeling or trait. In each of their roles the three main actors add a level of feeling to the characters that is lacking from many of the offerings of the dark comedy genre. Goodman's portrayal of Walter as the 'know it all' with a short fuse is downright hilarious. Jeff Bridges steps out of his usually serious persona to portray a character as laid back as they come, 'quite possibly the laziest in Los Angeles county.' Steve Buscemi is as entertaining as ever. His depiction of Donny, the character to rarely speak, adds depth to an otherwise bland side character. After viewing this film one can see why actors who can actually practice their craft are worth their weight in gold.
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1/10
Indefensible garbage
mnpollio27 January 2017
Warning: Spoilers
I have been a fan of a number of efforts from the Coen Brothers. Truthfully, even when they miss the mark, I am still able to find something worthwhile in the effort. The Big Lebowski is the exception to that rule. I originally saw it in theaters, where it played for an eyeblink and received mixed reviews. It was one of the few films my family has ever walked out on. I caught it later on cable and watched it to the end to see if I missed anything worthwhile, since it had inexplicably developed a cult following. The answer was a resounding no.

In what can complimentary be deemed a plot, the action centers on a zoned out bowler nicknamed The Dude, who somehow is mistaken for the title billionaire and gets pulled into what must be the most ill-conceived kidnapping plot in the history of cinema.

The ludicrous nature of the action would seem to recommend it to comedy, but the film is devoid of laughs. Unless the idea of a young woman's body parts being sent via mail is especially funny to you. The film introduces one needless and ostentatiously bizarre character after another in order to drum up some semblance of entertainment, but since none of them are important to the "plot" and have nothing of comical worth to contribute, it all seems a huge waste.

The dialogue is basically thinking up new ways to drop the f-bomb every 10 seconds. What passes for comedy is having the avuncular narrator (Sam Elliott) actually stop the proceedings at the midway point to good-naturedly ask The Dude why he has to to use such chronic foul language, to which The Dude responds with another f-bomb. How meta! How coy! And to rouse viewers lulled into a stupor, there are occasionally pointless unrelated fantasy sequences.

Julianne Moore shows up to no avail, speaking in some wacko old-Hollywood actress rhythm (think Jennifer Jason Leigh in The Hudsucker Proxy). But whereas Leigh's impersonation had a legitimate reason to be, Moore's quite simply does not. Jeff Bridges can be an amazing actor and has contributed some wonderful cinematic contributions. This is not one of them. It seems incomprehensible that a following has cropped up around this character, because The Dude is little more than a cipher. The Dude is a completely passive non-entity, who spends the duration in a zoned out state. He seems to have nary an opinion on anything and it is inconceivable that anyone could mistake him for the title character, much less a sentient being at all. The plot careens him from one improbable and unfunny set-up to another eliciting little in the way of energy or emotion from him. He is just not remotely interesting here.

The only appealing or likable characters in the film are Elliott's narrator and Steve Buscemi, as a perpetually sunny and helpful fellow bowler. Alas, Buscemi is basically here to be bullied, brutalized, cursed at, and finally die. If most of the cast is awash in unlikable and appalling characters, the worst by far is John Goodman. The normally reliable Goodman is so over-the-top that his every moment on screen is like fingernails down a chalkboard. He plays The Dude's "best friend", a completely incompetent bully who inserts himself into everything to the detriment of all involved. He drops the f-bomb as much as The Dude and treats everyone around him with loud-mouthed contempt. He is an illiterate, detestable, brutish bore and the performance desecrates the screen, yet the filmmakers actually seem to think his antics are a riot. The film is pretty awful without Goodman's godawful work, but with his participation it descends even further into cinematic hell.

I cannot think of anything to say complimentary about the film and the fact that this abomination was vomited forth by otherwise talented filmmakers seems inexcusable.
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A celebration of the ultimate man, nay, the ultimate dude
Engine-25 February 1999
I'd heard a lot of bad press about this movie. Not as good as Fargo, was a much used phrase. I wasn't overly impressed with Fargo, the atmosphere just didn't click for me, but anyway, that made me a little apprehensive about this.

It's easily better than Fargo, IMHO, and it's right up there with Barton Fink or Miller's Crossing. A true comedy classic with so many memorable lines and characters, but it's the movie's atmosphere which is so truly joyous, a wonderful celebration of basically doing nothing. Achieving one's goals is important, yes, but it's okay to set them low, is what I perceived this movie to be saying. As long as one is basically a good guy, then that's enough. Well, that's what it seemed like to me, and it was expressed so beautifully in the stunning cast of grotesques, lovely music ( although more Burwell would have been nice ), and the trippiest, funniest, most absurd dream sequences you've ever seen. Great stuff.
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Respectable Raunch
Movieguy-4729 July 1999
The Coen brothers (Joel and Ethan) are the most innovative and, perhaps, the best filmmakers working today. Or they at least rank along side the likes of Martin Scorsese and rising director star Quentin Tarantino. Think about it: "Blood Simple" was the best film of 1984; "Raising Arizona" was the best film of 1987; "Miller's Crossing" was the best movie of 1990; "Barton Fink" was the best movie of 1991; and "Fargo" was the best movie of 1996. Now comes their latest effort, "The Big Lebowski," which, while it isn't in quite the same league as the above films, is still one of the most thoroughly entertaining movies of 1998.

It tells the shambling story of a man named Jeff Lebowski, who calls himself The Dude (Jeff Bridges). The Dude's apartment gets broken into and a thief urinates on his rug. He finds out that the criminals were not looking for him, but looking for the OTHER Jeff Lebowski, the disabled millionaire (played by David Huddleston). That's all I can tell you. The rest is really too bizarre and complicated to put into words; but it's bizarre and complicated in the best ways of the words.

Still, what I'll remember most about "The Big Lebowski" is the outstanding number of utterly terrific performances. Bridges delivers the best performance of his career and probably the best of the year as a bum lie-about who just wants to be left alone. John Goodman is the real comic gem here as the forever-loudmouthed Walter, The Dude's bowling partner and best friend. Steve Buscemi co-stars as the dimwitted, bug-eyed Donny, the third bowling partner; there's a small but interestingly offbeat spot for Julianne Moore; and John Torturro stops in, as Jesus the bowler, for what is probably the best walk-on performance in years. If you are a Coen brothers fan or like humor that is distinctly offbeat, you have found your movie. As a rather avid moviegoer, I found the film to be a great excersise in pointless extremeties and respectable raunch. Rated R. 117 minutes. 10 out of 10.
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1/10
Biggest Movie Disappointment of My Life
GideonPope5 March 2011
Warning: Spoilers
I like non-main stream flicks - Blue Velvet, Boxing Helena, and so on. I like comedy that is not dependent on stupid sight gags or scatological humor. This movie had been out for a few years before I watched it. It was, I had heard, a gem that was waiting for me. I had looked forward to it greatly.

I didn't find any aspect of the movie funny, other than the enigma that it's well liked by many.

I suppose this is where I differ from most - I don't find a guy walking around with a mixed drink all the time funny. I don't find Dan Conner overreaching as a guy who is a Vietnam vet freaking out about anything funny, particularly because that's been done before. I don't find the Italian guy acting fooling while bowling to be funny. I don't find referencing a guy as "the dude," with article obligatory, to be funny. And on and on. What's funny? Dennis Miller. He's funny. George Carlin. He's funny. The Big Lebowski - not funny.

I really don't have any comment on the ins and outs of the movie. Just not funny, and, given that it's a comedy, that, to me, is a fatal mistake.
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3/10
dear fans of "the big lebowski": what the hell, over?
roneBOFH31 December 2007
This movie is not funny, it is not memorable, and it is not enjoyable. It's a story that reads like it was written by some pinhead with ADD who heavily self-medicates with marijuana; a ridiculous amount of random things happened for no damn discernible reason or even a more than tenuous connection between them. I am a charter member of the Jeff Bridges Fan Club and the way he was wasted was nearly criminal, and the same goes for Steve Buscemi. The movie needed a lot less John Goodman and a lot more John Turturro. It feels like some film student decided to ape the Coen brothers. If i hadn't rented this movie for free with a coupon, i would feel totally ripped off. Something about the movie made me dodge it when it came out, and all the years since, but i finally decided to fill in a gap in my Coen brothers movie track, and now i'm sorry. I blame all of you jerks.
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10/10
A Great film
Oliver19845 November 1998
The Coen Brothers did it again! Just when I had lost my hope of seeing a new, GOOD, American movie, I went to see this. It absolutely blew my mind! Now I've seen all the Coen-films, and I'd have to say that this is one of the very best. It's about this guy, "The Dude", excellently played by Jeff Bridges, who gets an unexpected visit from two thugs who soil his carpet. This event triggers a kidnapping-drama, filled with black humor and crazy characters. I'd recommend this film to everyone with an open mind and a twisted sense of humor. Perhaps thats why I liked it so much.
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1/10
boe_dye sez: it wasn't funny, it wasn't not funny, it wasn't much of anything really
boe_dye29 August 2009
Certain movies you can sort of understand why they are cult classics, other films such as this one, seem to be funny and intelligent because someone said it was funny and intelligent and therefore must be funny and intelligent.

I suppose you could find deeper meaning in this, or perhaps the meaning was right there on the surface. But like many of the Coen Brothers films that I have watched I either like them or I don't.

The ones that I liked usually have a strong story behind them, the ones that I don't like seem to be more of a "day in the life of" story about people who really don't seem to matter and about events that no one really cares about.

Maybe there is some type of amusement in trivial matters, making bored college frat boys feel more intelligent then they really are, but I need something deeper for intellectual stimulation.

For my comedy, I don't need slapstick or pie in the face humor to make me laugh. Cynicism, witty dialogue, sarcasm, commentary and so on, not one line random events that happen out of no where with no real context and then expected to be funny.

(which is not to say that slapstick pie in the face humor doesn't make me laugh at times...) A very random film with very to little no substance to it. A few quirky one liners here and there, but in all honesty I was more looking at the clock waiting for this film to end then I was looking at the film waiting for it to be entertaining.

Yet for some reason it has a cult following and there it is... However one should keep in mind that cults generally comprise of brainwashed individuals who really can't think for themselves anyways and generally follow wherever they are pointed to like mindless sheople...
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10/10
It's good knowin' he's out there. The Dude. Takin' 'er easy for all us sinners."
Galina4 January 2015
Warning: Spoilers
Looks like while making "The Big Lebowski" (1998)– weird, nutty, outrageously funny and deliciously twisted movie, the brothers Ethan and Joel Coens, known for their unique and dry humor, sat back, laughed out loud, and had fun. "Big Lebowski" turned as one of the funniest comedies ever made. It is funny because of the incredibly off-beat characters, their weirdness, flaws, their interactions, the surreal situations they found themselves in, and perfectly written and delivered hilarious dialogs. There is the story, of course, which is based on the case of mistaken identity with the following kidnapping, villainous nihilists, vanguard erotic flying painter, the bowler named Jesus but the story is truly secondary to the delicious craziness of the movie.

Some reviewers call Big Lebowski misfire and deranged mess, saying that the story is convoluted with the characters we would not care about a bit. It was also interesting to read the reviews that were written upon its release and compared it to Coens' "Fargo" that had been made a year earlier than the adventure of Jeffrey "the Dude" Lebowski (Jeff Bridges)."Fargo" could be Coens' masterwork but it does not make Lebowski any worse. It was dismissed as the inferior film and was predicted not to stand the future re-watch. The time has proved the predictions wrong. "The Dude" Lebowski - middle-aged pot smoking, White Russian drinking, bowling enthusiast ex-hippie, and his friends, Polish Catholic converted Jew, "more Jewish than Tevye" Vietnam veteran Walter with anger management problems (John Goodman) and timid, little slow, "sweet prince" Donny (unusually quiet Steve Buscemi) have become the cult figures, the beloved characters, for millions of film lovers of different generations, not only the baby- boomers.

The Coen Brothers have made twenty films, and all of them are treasure, including their contribution in the 2006 anthology, Paris, je t'aime. I've seen all their films and I want to repeat the title of my review on their latest, "Burn after reading" - The Coen Brothers don't make bad movies, because they don't know how. Their films, Including the cult favorite, Big Lebowski, should not be missed. They are clever, darkly funny, and beautiful without being pretty pictures. In short, they are first class entertainment.
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1/10
I do not get it.
Impugn_Original29 January 2007
Absolutely unwatchable. Tried it twice, figuring one attempt wasn't sufficient.

I am not offended by vulgar language, but when it is such a major portion of the dialogue, it had better be with good reason and to great effect. Neither is the case, here.

These characters are the types of people that normal people with lives pass by numerous times a day without taking any notice. There is a reason for that. Folks like that are uninspiring, dull, and generally useless to the world they inhabit. Centering a movie script on them is going to make you a dolt or a genius, depending how sycophantic your fan base is. It seems too many people checked their good judgment at the door - not only giving this movie a free pass, but pumping up the votes to the extent that this turd rates in the Top 250. Whoa geez.

Again, I say, "Absolutely unwatchable."
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2/10
The Big Bust
bandw1 May 2013
I recently saw an interview with Jeff Bridges where he commented that he has become personally identified with "The Dude," the character he plays in this movie. He also noted that "The Big Lebowski" has developed a cult following. The interviewer added some praise. That, together with the high rating on IMDb, convinced me to give this a shot.

Early on I realized that the story was not to be taken seriously. This movie is a series of loosely connected comedy sketches (well, some hardly connected at all). The result is an absurdest comedy that had very few laughs for me.

I did not find The Dude at all appealing as a person. How much is there to admire in someone whose life goals seem to be bowling and drinking white Russians? I do give Bridges credit for inhabiting the role. John Goodman's character really grated on me--his passions seem to be bowling and the f word.

The positives: the scenes with John Turturro gave me some laughs; the scenes filmed from within a bowling ball were an interesting curiosity; some non sequiturs were worth a few chuckles.

I guess one person's humor is another person's tedium. I found this movie to be tedious.
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1/10
What's the Point? It isn't funny
michael_the_nermal10 March 2008
Spoilers ahead.

I frankly do not understand why "The Big Lebowski" has been elevated to the point of being considered one of the best cult classics of all-time. Why this cult around the character of "The Dude", one of the blandest, flavorless, most uninteresting comedy protagonists ever to be put on celluloid? He's simply some dopey hippie who loves to hang around a John Goodman cardboard-cutout Vietnam vet gone loco (real Vets should raise their fists in anger over such an overdone, unfunny, disrespectful and insulting characterization) and a seldomly-seen Steve Buscemi, who doesn't really do much. The plot winds into so many different twists and turns and includes so many supporting characters, all of whom seek The Dude's bag of money, that trying to understand this movie is like trying to untangle the Gordian Knot by hand. What's the point of placing layer upon layer upon layer of weird, uninteresting characters to the point that you forget what the hell this movie is about? Nihilist German rockers? Some sicko Hugh Hefner clone? A gorgeous yet incomprehensible avant-garde artist who wants to have "The Dude's" baby? A strange drugstore cowboy who serves as some sort of Greek chorus? Stop it! "Pee-Wee's Big Adventure" had an array of weird characters, but it succeeded because it had a straightforward plot and brilliant acting and writing. The Coen's monstrosity has little wit or signs of superb comic writing, and all of their characters, though weird, are totally boring and flavorless. For weird characters to work, they must act totally off-the-wall and twisted beyond realism. The weirdos in "Lebowski" are actually regular, and seem like a mish-mash of all-too-real rejects from a yuppie coffee bar.

Who likes this stuff? I have just seen "No Country for Old Men", and, like "Lebowski", that was poorly written in terms of a smooth plot; and, like "Lebowski", lacked any interesting characters. I'll give "Fargo" a chance; otherwise, the Coen Brothers ain't reeling me in with their weird, clunky movies.
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2/10
long, humorless film
comco-131 August 2010
This film was supposed to be a comedy, and I admit that the very last scene was funny, but the rest of the film had no humor. The tremendous dependence on a single expletive and its many forms became dull and boring after the first five minutes during which it was used about 100 times. The two scenes in which a topless woman appeared were obviously inserted just so she could be shown, but there was no point other than that one. The scene in which a Corvette was destroyed was completely predictable, and it unfolded in a strange way, and then faded away.

Julianna Moore was the best part of the film, and Joe Pesci's talents were wasted on a trivial part for which he clearly had no enthusiasm.

Jeff Bridges practiced in his role for his academy award as the character was identical.

Once again, Hollywood insists that all drug usage is good, lack of moral character is good, drinking is good, and being a bum is good if you have a heart of gold.

The film was long, too.
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1/10
Not watchable
film32125 June 2016
Sometimes the film is so good you have to say something. Sometimes the film is so bad you have to say something. Unfortunately it is the latter in this case.

I finally started to watch The Big Lebowski. Great reviews everywhere. Have to watch it. It is one of Coen brothers movies. It is rated almost five stars in Amazon. It is rated 8.2 on IMDb. It has to be good, right?

Not quite. I couldn't finish it - I had to stop watching it.

In the beginning you see a resemblance in the style of this movie and a lot of Quentin Tarantino's movies. I don't know if Coen brothers are borrowing from Quentin Tarantino, or if it's the other way around, but there seems to be plenty of resemblance to this film and Tarantino's films in general.

The best Coen brothers movie that they made was Fargo, and maybe it was so good because it was based on a true story. But for this, The Big Lebowski, it reeked of stupidity...but without comedy. It seemed to border on fantasy and improbability.
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6/10
You see what happens, Larry?
Shawn Watson25 September 1998
Warning: Spoilers
It's hard to pick out one line of dialogue in particular for two reasons. One-almost everything said in this film is downright hilarious. And Two-the F word is spoken 281 times so there's not many sentences that don't contain it. 144 sentences also end in 'man'.

Jeff 'The Dude' Lebowski is a man living a minimalistic existence. He has no job, no ambitions and no worries. His days, be they weekdays or weekends, are spent bowling, driving around or having the occasional acid flashback. His pals are Walter Sobchak, a security expert and half-crazed Vietnam vet and Donny, a humble, mousy little man who is left out of almost every conversation.

The Dude is happy with his easy-going life of nothingness until two thugs ambush him in his house believing him to the OTHER Jeff 'The Big' Lebowski, the millionaire with a trouble-making wife who owes money all over town. These thugs are none too happy with their dumb error and re-assert themselves by peeing on The Dude's rug.

This very much displeases The Dude as this rug really tied the room together and since he cannot track down the 'Chinaman' thug responsible he decides to take it out of the Big Lebowski, as it's now HIM who owes a new rug. The Dude is welcomed into the Big Lebowski's mansion by Brandt the butler, a man so appallingly sycophantic he'd make Weylon Smither's look bad. But his millionaire namesake is not so ready and willing to give hand-outs and basically tells The Dude to get lost.

At this point things become quite complicated as a bunch of ex-pop star Nihilist thugs, a powerful pornographer, a dejected feminist daughter, a Brother Seamus (NOT an Irish Monk), a joyriding teenager, a revolting pederast champion bowler, Saddam Hussein, a mysterious cowboy and a doctor who is insistent on him removing his shorts all make The Dude's life suddenly a helluva lot more interesting. The plot thickens and thickens and the dude is dragged to dozens of different places across LA, going from limo to limo, never too far from a white Russian or a doobie.

There are zillions of idiosyncrasies in this film that keeps it new and interesting every time you watch it. Every scene and every line of dialogue is so memorable that, like me, you'll be acting the film out for years. Even on a 100th viewing you'll notice dramatic ironies, character arcs and ingenious wordplay that went right over your head before.

The acting is superb. I am a fan of Jeff Bridges but he completely disappears in this film. He truly BECOMES The Dude and shows little of his recognisable self. John Goodman, in probably the most under-rated role of his career, is the world's angriest man. Bringing frustration and smart-ass arrogance to every scene (though he's almost always right). Set well over a decade after 'nam (and during the first Gulf conflict) Walter seems to be suffering from perpetual, ever-lasting post-traumatic stress syndrome as he blows up in any situation. Take a look at his 'minor' confrontation with Smokey for example.

It's not about plot, or even characters. It's about a certain moment in time, the early 90s. And the definitive man of that time was the Dude. The rug-peeing just happened to occur simultaneously.
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