Fa yeung nin wa
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In the Mood for Love (2000) More at IMDbPro »Fa yeung nin wa (original title)


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

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China: Through The Looking Glass breaks record by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2015-08-30 16:37:38

30 August 2015 8:37 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Wong Kar Wai In The Mood For Love in China: Through The Looking Glass Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The New York Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute exhibition China: Through The Looking Glass, with The Grandmaster director Wong Kar Wai as artistic director, has been extended to run through Monday, September 7, 2015. The exhibition includes clips from films by Hou Hsiao-Hsien, Zhang Yimou, Michelangelo Antonioni, Jiang Wen, Yonggang Wu, Bernardo Bertolucci, Sergio Leone, Richard Quine and Vincente Minnelli that are expertly edited and placed throughout three floors of galleries, including the Anna Wintour Costume Center, which magically merge film with fashion and the museum's collection.

Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations in 2012 with Baz Luhrmann as creative consultant was not nearly as popular. Up until this point, Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty was the most attended and the only other Costume Institute exhibition to be extended. China: Through The Looking Glass, also curated by Andrew Bolton, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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TV Is Not the New Film, But It’s Ok That Festivals Are Blurring the Lines

26 August 2015 6:56 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Peter Debruge: Looks like Toronto is the latest film festival to add a television section to its lineup. These days, everywhere from Sundance to SXSW to the Canadian “festival of festivals,” smallscreen content is getting a big push, which is intriguing — and even ironic — for all sorts of reasons (ironic because the state of distribution being what it is, many of the films in Toronto will end up trickling down to VOD, rather than ever getting a commercial theatrical run). On one hand, the trend isn’t exactly new: Classy longform features like “Carlos” (which premiered at Cannes in 2010), “Top of the Lake” (Sundance 2013) and “Olive Kitteridge” (Venice 2014) made their bows at top-tier film fests before going on to air as miniseries on Canal Plus, BBC Two and HBO, respectively.

But Toronto’s Primetime program — like SXSW’s Episodics, which launched last year — represents something different: Rather than expanding the »

- Justin Chang and Peter Debruge

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TV Is Not the New Film, But It’s Ok That Festivals Are Blurring the Lines

26 August 2015 6:56 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Peter Debruge: Looks like Toronto is the latest film festival to add a television section to its lineup. These days, everywhere from Sundance to SXSW to the Canadian “festival of festivals,” smallscreen content is getting a big push, which is intriguing — and even ironic — for all sorts of reasons (ironic because the state of distribution being what it is, many of the films in Toronto will end up trickling down to VOD, rather than ever getting a commercial theatrical run). On one hand, the trend isn’t exactly new: Classy longform features like “Carlos” (which premiered at Cannes in 2010), “Top of the Lake” (Sundance 2013) and “Olive Kitteridge” (Venice 2014) made their bows at top-tier film fests before going on to air as miniseries on Canal Plus, BBC Two and HBO, respectively.

But Toronto’s Primetime program — like SXSW’s Episodics, which launched last year — represents something different: Rather than expanding the »

- Justin Chang and Peter Debruge

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New Europe Film Sales picks up Mark Cousins’ 'I Am Belfast'

24 August 2015 6:34 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Documentary played in competition at Karlovy Vary.

Jan Naszewski’s Warsaw-based sales outlet New Europe Film Sales has picked up world sales rights to Mark Cousins’ documentary, I Am Belfast.

In the film, the Northern Ireland city is personified by a 10,000 year old woman who reveals its story. Themes brought up in the film range from the landscapes surrounding the city, its changing architecture and social structure to the political and personal repercussions of the Northern Irish conflict.

The feature, with a score by composer David Holmes (Ocean’s Eleven), received its world premiere as the opening feature of the Belfast Film Festival in April and played in the documentary competition of the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival in July.

Cousins previous documentaries include A Story of Children and Film (2013), The Story of Film: An Odyssey (2011) and The First Movie (2009).

I Am Belfast is a co-production between Hopscotch Films and Canderblinks Films.  It was funded »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Tiff 2015: ‘Hong Kong Trilogy: Preschooled Preoccupied Preposterous’ trailer examines three generations of residents

20 August 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Cinematographer Christopher Doyle is set to take the director’s chair once again, this time for a documentary.

Titled Hong Kong Trilogy: Preschooled Preoccupied Preposterous, the film is Doyle’s third full-length movie as a director, and first since 2008. Doyle writes and shoots the film as well.

The film’s synopsis is as follows:

Renowned cinematographer and artist Christopher Doyle celebrates Hong Kong and its people with this documentary-fiction hybrid that focuses on Hong Kong residents in their childhood, youth, and old age.

Doyle is most famous for his cinematography work, having notably worked with Wong Kar Wai on numerous projects, including Chungking Express, In The Mood For Love, and 2046. He also shot the 1998 Psycho along with Lady in the Water and The Limits of Control. The trailer itself highlights his skill as a cinematographer, while providing a glimpse at the kinds of stories that will be presented in the »

- Deepayan Sengupta

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Busan unveils New Currents Jury; top 10 Asian films

17 August 2015 8:45 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

South Korea’s 20th Busan International Film Festival (Biff) has announced iconic Taiwanese actress and filmmaker Sylvia Chang will lead this year’s New Currents jury.

The Golden Bear-nominated 20 30 40, which Chang directed and acted in, screened in Busan’s A Window on Asian Cinema section in 2004.

She has also helped discover and produce for new directing talents who previously included Ann Hui and Edward Yang.

Joining her on the jury: Indian director Anurag Kashyap, whose critically-acclaimed innovative works include Black Friday, Dev.D and Gangs of Wasseypur I & II; German actress Nastassja Kinski, whose films include Roman Polanski’s Tess and Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas; Korean director Kim Tae-yong, whose films include Memento Mori, Family Ties and Late Autumn; and Village Voice chief film critic Stephanie Zacharek.

The jury will award $30,000 each to two films in the competition for new Asian directors.

Biff will run Oct 1-10 with the Asian Film Market running Oct 3-6 this year.

Asian »

- hjnoh2007@gmail.com (Jean Noh)

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Busan Festival Proposes Ranking of Best-Ever Asian Films

12 August 2015 5:55 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ozu Yasujiro’s “Tokyo Story” is the best Asian film, according to a new list published by the Busan Intl. Film Festival, as part of its 20th anniversary celebrations.

In second place was “Rashomon,” by another Japanese director Kurosawa Akira, with Wong Kar Wai’s “In the Mood for Love” in third place.

The “Asian Cinema 100” initiative was a joint venture by the festival and the Busan Cinema Center. They called on the opinions of 73 prominent film professionals including film critics such as Jonathan Rosenbaum, Tony Rayns and Hasumi Shigehiko, as well as festival programmers, and film directors Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Bong Joon-ho and Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

Each was asked to recommend his top 10 films. That resulted in 113 selections and 106 directors (including joint rankings) for the final 100 list.

The festival will screen the top 10 films (actually 11, including equally ranked titles) and also publish a book.

Busan said it will repeat the exercise every five years. »

- Patrick Frater

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Watch: 9-Minute Video Essay Explores The Art Of Wong Kar-Wai's 'In The Mood For Love'

16 July 2015 1:44 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

This year marks the 15th anniversary of Wong Kar-wai’s superb “In the Mood for Love," and a new video from The Nerdwriter arrived to help us better understand the sumptuously-shot film. Roughly nine-minutes-long, the newest video in the “Understanding Art” series not only digs into the thematically-charged cinematography by Christopher Doyle and Mark Lee Ping Bin, but also the subtext of the relatively simple story: after realizing their spouses are having an affair with each other, two neighbors in early 1960s Hong Kong help each other deal with the fallout of the infidelity. Much is made about how the shots featuring the two leads, Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung, have them framed by the architecture of the sets, i.e. window and door frames, as well as by hallways. Also noted is the fact that the two philandering spouses are never properly seen onscreen, instead centering this story of »

- Cain Rodriguez

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Watch: Explore the Framing and Language of ‘In the Mood For Love’ In New Video Essay

15 July 2015 1:04 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Being one of the 21st century’s most acclaimed films, Wong Kar-wai‘s In the Mood for Love is quickly approaching the point where everything that can be said about it has been said. When few movies inspire the same sort of contact high, from the lushness of Christopher Doyle‘s cinematography to Leung and Cheung‘s glances to Shigeru […] »

- Nick Newman

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Alleluia | Review

13 July 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

In the Mood For Love: Du Welz Returns With Gloriously Dark Rendering of Insatiable Passion

His first film since 2008’s underappreciated Vinyan, Belgian director Fabrice Du Welz debuts the second installment in his proposed Ardennes trilogy, Alleluia. His 2004 directorial debut, Calvaire (aka The Ordeal) depicted a rather hellacious account of a singer whose car breaks down in the middle of the woods, stranding him in the midst of a very strange and terrifying rural community. Here, Du Welz bases his latest madness on the true account of serial killing couple Martha Beck and Raymond Fernandez, a case that famously inspired the 1969 film The Honeymoon Killers and 1996’s Deep Crimson, amongst others. But Du Welz hardly unveils a simple account of unhinged, obsessive love. His is a demonic hymnal of passion, a darkly droll exercise in the delusory notion of love as an unhealthy obsession told with aggressive flourish. But »

- Nicholas Bell

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2015 Fantasia Film Festival Unleashes Very Impressive Lineup; World Premiere of Antisocial 2 Included!

9 July 2015 2:22 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

Always a film festival that prides itself on giving its audiences a hell of a lineup, filled to the brim with standout titles every year and world premieres for films that are greatly anticipated, the 2015 Fantasia Film Festival has now revealed its final lineup. Like we’ve all come to appreciate, this year is no exception, with films such as Tales Of Halloween, Ant-Man, the greatly anticipated Cop Car (which will be screened with Kevin Bacon in attendance!!) and Jeruzalem all being standout films to look out for, along with a pretty epic list of other films that are sure to leave viewers entertained and excited throughout the entire event (July 14th-August 4th).

If the full lineup wasn’t already enough to make your horror loving heads explode, the new announcement that Fanstasia will host the July 30th premiere of Cody Calahan’s sequel to 2013’s Antisocial,  Antisocial 2, »

- Jerry Smith

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‘Attack on Titan’, Sion Sono, ‘Cop Car’ among full Fantasia ’15 lineup

7 July 2015 8:47 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The 19th Annual Fantasia Film Festival is only a week away, beginning July 14 and running through August 4. And as promised for today, they’ve revealed their full line-up of films screening at 2015’s festival in Montreal.

This year’s line-up boasts 22 World Premieres, 13 International Premieres, and 21 North American Premieres. Both Marvel’s Ant-Man and the animated Miss Hokusai were previously announced, but now they’ve added the much anticipated Attack on Titan movie as their closing night film. Other highlights include the Sundance darlings Cooties, starring Elijah Wood and Rainn WilsonCop Car, starring Kevin Bacon and directed by the upcoming Spider-man director Jon Watts, and a trio of films from horror auteur Sion Sono.

See the full line-up announcement of films below via Fantasia’s Facebook page, and be sure to check out their website at fantasiafestival.com for additional information.

****

Fantasia 2015:

36 Countries, 135 Features, and Nearly 300 Short Films

- Including 22 World Premieres, »

- Brian Welk

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Joshua Reviews Khavn’s Ruined Heart: Another Love Story Between A Criminal And A Whore [Nyaff 2015 Review]

3 July 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

To cinephiles, few cinematographers get the blood truly pumping quite like beloved and Criterion-approved director of photography Christopher Doyle. Best known for his iconic work in films like Wong Kar-Wai’s In The Mood For Love (to this very day one of the greatest achievements in film photography), Doyle has honed his craft largely outside of the United States, occasionally coming stateside to work with filmmakers like Gus Van Sant (Paranoid Park) or even Barry Levinson (Liberty Heights). Working numerous times with directors like Wong Kar-Wai, as well as the likes of Zhang Yimou and Edward Yang (Doyle’s first film was Yang’s That Day, on the Beach), he has become a bastion of the world cinema scene and one of today’s most beloved photographers.

Playing this year’s New York Asian Film Festival is his latest journey behind the camera, as Filipino poet/filmmaker/artist Khavn (aka »

- Joshua Brunsting

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Why 2001 was the best year in film history

28 April 2015 12:03 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Click here for a complete list of our essays. "Mulholland Drive." "Donnie Darko." "Spirited Away." "Ghost World." "The Royal Tenenbaums." "Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring." "Wet Hot American Summer." "Pulse." "Hedwig and the Angry Inch." If you're not stunned by the sheer variety of greatness in the above list of films, you probably won't be on board with my argument for 2001 as the greatest year in movie history. And if you're puzzled by the exclusion of "A Beautiful Mind," then you might as well stop reading now. "A Beautiful Mind," of course, won Best Picture at the Oscars the following year, an honor that felt undeserved at the time and positively baffles in hindsight. The Ron Howard-directed drama was an ephemeral triumph, the kind of middle-of-the-road Hollywood »

- Chris Eggertsen

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25 underrated 1990s movie soundtracks

28 April 2015 3:02 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From Muppet Treasure Island to Speed, we take a look at the 90s soundtracks that deserve another listen...

Ah, the 1990s. The decade that brought us The Lion King. Titanic. Quentin Tarantino. That wordless bathroom scene in Baz Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet. Angelo Badalamenti's Twin Peaks. Duel of the Fates from Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. In the Mood for Love.

It was a good 10 years for film music, no doubt.

But scratch the surface of 1991 through 1999 and there are tons of good scores ready to spring a surprise on your ears. Some were attached to sorely underrated movies, others were overshadowed by wildly successful ones, and some have simply been forgotten in the passage of time.

Here, in no particular order, are the top 25 underappreciated film soundtracks from the 1990s.

1. Chaplin - John Barry

Okay, let's start with a big one. Richard Attenborough. Robert Downey Jr. John Barry. »

- simonbrew

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Relativity, Condé Nast Entertainment Partner on Met Costume Institute Gala Documentary (Exclusive)

16 April 2015 9:44 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Relativity Studios is partnering with Condé Nast Entertainment and Vogue to produce and distribute a documentary about the making of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s spring 2015 Costume Institute exhibition and gala.

The companies have tapped Andrew Rossi, the filmmaker behind “Page One: Inside the New York Times” and “Ivory Tower,” to direct the look at how the annual showcase of haute couture is created.

It’s the latest example of a news company teaming up with a movie studio on a joint venture. In recent months, the likes of Newsweek, “60 Minutes” and BuzzFeed have all collaborated with studios or production companies on projects that mine their areas of coverage for bigscreen entertainments.

In this case there’s some natural overlap. The gala tends to bring out a crowd of A-list Hollywood players, eager to show off their high fashion bona fides on the red carpet.

The documentary will chronicle »

- Brent Lang

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Hey, Toronto! Win Tickets To Hou Hsiao-hsien's Millennium Mambo!

25 February 2015 7:30 AM, PST | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

While we've been rather fixated on the Alex de la Iglesia retrospective running at Toronto's Tiff Bell Lightbox right now - as we should be, being that we're presenting it - there's plenty of other good stuff going on there, too. Such as? How about a lengthy retrospective of the films of Taiwanese auteur Hou Hsiao-hsien? That series is going on right now, too, with a screening of his classic Millennium Mambo hitting the big screen on March 1st at 6:30 pm. And we've got a pair of tickets to give away!Hou's In the Mood for Love, Millennium Mambo captures the sheer weightlessness, the inertia and amnesia of life in contemporary Taipei by focusing on free-spirited bar hostess Vicky (Hong Kong diva Shu Qi) as...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Cinematographers pick the best-shot films of all time

4 February 2015 12:31 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Stumbling across that list of best-edited films yesterday had me assuming that there might be other nuggets like that out there, and sure enough, there is American Cinematographer's poll of the American Society of Cinematographers membership for the best-shot films ever, which I do recall hearing about at the time. But they did things a little differently. Basically, in 1998, cinematographers were asked for their top picks in two eras: films from 1894-1949 (or the dawn of cinema through the classic era), and then 1950-1997, for a top 50 in each case. Then they followed up 10 years later with another poll focused on the films between 1998 and 2008. Unlike the editors' list, though, ties run absolutely rampant here and allow for way more than 50 films in each era to be cited. I'd love to see what these lists would look like combined, however. I imagine "Citizen Kane," which was on top of the 1894-1949 list, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Best 'Super Bowl' Commercials of 2015

2 February 2015 12:13 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Yesterday during Super Bowl Xlix, we showed you all of the movie and TV related trailers that debuted during the big game (clickHere to check them out), but, of course, these were just a small percentage of all the ads that premiered last night. Advertisers spent a record $4.5 million for just a single 30-second spot, with many companies using major celebrities to try and sell their products and services, including Jeff Bridges, Bryan Cranston, Matt Damon, Kim Kardashian, Kate Upton and even a mash-up of Danny Trejo's Machete and The Brady Bunch. In case there are some ads you missed, or you just want to watch them again, we have every Super Bowl commercial right here for your viewing pleasure:

Always - #LikeAGirl

Avacadoes from Mexico - #FirstDraftEver

Bud Light - "Real Life Pac-Man"

Budwesier - "Lost Dog"

BMW - "Newfangled Idea" with Bryant Gumbel and Katie Couric

Carnival »

- MovieWeb

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Alibaba Pictures Teams With Wong Kar Wai And Tony Leung For First Film

11 January 2015 12:17 PM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Celebrated Hong Kong filmmaker Wong Kar Wai (In The Mood For Love) will produce his first film for Alibaba Pictures, the film production arm of Jack Ma’s online retail giant. Bai Du Ren will be written and directed by Zhang Jiajia and will star Wong Kar Wai regular Tony Leung (2046).

The film will also be the first greenlit by Alibaba Pictures since the company was rebranded following Jack Ma’s acquisition of Chinavision.

At a Beijing event at which Wong Kar Wai was present, Alibaba execs revealed they have acquired adaptation rights for My Fair Princess and the overseas distribution rights for French filmmaker Jean-Jacques Annaud’s Wolf Totem. Iconic Hong Kong producer Bill Kong is at the helm of the latter film, which has been years in the making.

Jack Ma has previously labelled Alibaba the “biggest entertainment company in the world.” He has been gradually building up Alibaba’s content capabilities. »

- Ali Jaafar

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

1-20 of 21 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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