3.5/10
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87 user 30 critic

An Alan Smithee Film: Burn Hollywood Burn (1997)

When a rookie filmmaker with the unfortunate name Alan Smithee realizes he's an unwitting studio puppet, being forced to make a big-budget action film he knows is horrible, he steals the master reels and tries to make a deal.

Director:

(as Alan Smithee)

Writer:

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6 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Leon Brothers
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Jerry Glover
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Michelle Rafferty
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Ann Glover
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Sam Rizzo
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Gary Samuels
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Sista Tu Lumumba
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Stagger Lee
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Bill Bardo
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Wayne Jackson
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Storyline

Director Alan Smithee comes to Hollywood to make a movie. Due to a variety of factors, he decides to disown it and direct it under a pseudonym. Unfortunately, the Director's Guild requires that if a director disowns a movie in this fashion, he *must* use the official Director's Guild pseudonym...which happens to be Alan Smithee. Written by Afterburner <aburner@erols.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Great Cans. Great Movies. See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language and some sexual humor | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

20 February 1998 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

An Alan Smithee Film  »

Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$28,992 (USA) (1 March 1998)

Gross:

$45,779 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mick Jagger and Michael York were considered for the role of Alan Smithee. See more »

Quotes

Alan Smithee: It's worse than "Showgirls"!
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Crazy Credits

Various extra scenes and outtakes during the end credits. See more »

Connections

References Basic Instinct (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

BROTHER'S GONNA WORK IT OUT
Written by Keith Shocklee, Chuck D, and Eric Sadler
Performed by Public Enemy
Courtesy of Def Jam Records by arrangement with PolyGram Film & TV Licensing
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User Reviews

 
Not as bad as you might think
16 October 2000 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I disagree with the people here saying this is one of the worst films ever made. I'm somewhat of a connosieur of bad films, and that just isn't the case. It's competently put together from front to back, but the script definitely could have used another draft or two.

At its worst, it's just unfunny, not mind-bendingly horrible as some would have you to believe. Certainly if you know nothing about the inner workings of Hollywood you won't understand the references and almost none of it will be funny.

I'm sure there were lots of references I didn't understand -- I get the feeling people working in Hollywood would get more out of this movie than the rest of us. One odd reference is the repeated name of "Michael Ovitz" throughout the movie. It appears in the song "I Wanna Be Michael Ovitz" in the soundtrack, there's a "Paging Dr. Ovitz..." in the background in a hospital, etc. It's not quite clear what writer Eszterhas's feelings toward Ovitz are -- does he hate him or look up to him?

Another thing I don't understand is why director Arthur Hiller felt he had to change his credit to "Alan Smithee", except that it's amusingly appropriate. Looking at the film, I can't imagine that it was changed too radically in the editing, except perhaps the ultra-acidic put-downs on the title cards that introduce new characters.


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