Affliction
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

5 items from 2002


Oscar-Winning Actor James Coburn Dies at 74

19 November 2002 | IMDb News

James Coburn, the tough-guy actor known for his roles in The Magnificent Seven and Our Man Flint, died Monday at age 74 of a heart attack. Coburn was at his Beverly Hills home with his wife Paula when he suffered a massive coronary at 4:30 p.m. PST; he was rushed to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. The tall, imposing actor with the wicked grin won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1998 for Paul Schrader's Affliction, in which he played the abusive, alcoholic father of Nick Nolte, capping an illustrious career that began with the 1959 Western Ride Lonesome. Another Western a year later, The Magnificent Seven, made Coburn a name actor and catapulted him into roles in major Hollywood features, including Hell Is For Heroes, Charade, The Great Escape, and The Americanization of Emily. He achieved his greatest success as suave secret agent Derek Flint in Our Man Flint (1966) and In Like Flint (1967), which were considered the best James Bond spoofs ever made, and an inspiration for the Austin Powers films. Character roles followed in the 70s, including The Last of Shelia, Bite the Bullet, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid and Cross of Iron. Coburn also achieved a comeback in the 90s, after he overcame a 15-year battle with rheumatoid arthritis that threatened his career in the 80s, when he scaled back his film appearances dramatically. In the past ten years, he appeared in films as varied as Young Guns II, The Nutty Professor, Maverick, and lent his voice to last year's hit film Monsters Inc. ; in all, he made over 100 movies. Coburn is survived by his wife, two children, Lisa and James Jr., and two grandchildren. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar-Winning Actor James Coburn Dies at 74

19 November 2002 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

James Coburn, the tough-guy actor known for his roles in The Magnificent Seven and Our Man Flint, died Monday at age 74 of a heart attack. Coburn was at his Beverly Hills home with his wife Paula when he suffered a massive coronary at 4:30 p.m. PST; he was rushed to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. The tall, imposing actor with the wicked grin won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1998 for Paul Schrader's Affliction, in which he played the abusive, alcoholic father of Nick Nolte, capping an illustrious career that began with the 1959 Western Ride Lonesome. Another Western a year later, The Magnificent Seven, made Coburn a name actor and catapulted him into roles in major Hollywood features, including Hell Is For Heroes, Charade, The Great Escape, and The Americanization of Emily. He achieved his greatest success as suave secret agent Derek Flint in Our Man Flint (1966) and In Like Flint (1967), which were considered the best James Bond spoofs ever made, and an inspiration for the Austin Powers films. Character roles followed in the 70s, including The Last of Shelia, Bite the Bullet, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid and Cross of Iron. Coburn also achieved a comeback in the 90s, after he overcame a 15-year battle with rheumatoid arthritis that threatened his career in the 80s, during which he scaled back his film appearances dramatically. In the past ten years, he appeared in films as varied as Young Guns II, The Nutty Professor, Maverick, and lent his voice to last year's hit film Monsters Inc. ; in all, he made over 100 movies. Coburn is survived by his wife, two children, Lisa and James Jr., and two grandchildren. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Nolte Charged with Taking Date Rape Drug

24 October 2002 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Hollywood actor Nick Nolte was driving under the influence of date rape drug GHB when he was arrested by the California Highway Patrol last month. The Affliction star was pulled over by police on September 11 after his Mercedes car was spotted swerving around a Malibu highway. Nolte was pulled from his car and photographed by paparazzi looking bedraggled, "drooling" and "completely out of it." After he was bailed the next day, 61-year-old Nolte checked into a Connecticut substance abuse clinic. Prosecutors yesterday filed two misdemeanor charged against the actor, for riving under the influence and being under the influence of a controlled substance, after investigations found he had synthetic depressant Gamma- Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in his system at the time of his arrest. A clear liquid chemical, Ghb, has a history of being used by "date rapists" to sedate their victims. It sometimes goes by the street name "Liquid Ecstasy." »

Permalink | Report a problem


Scorsese, Peck seeding HBO's 'Cloudsplitter'

21 October 2002 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

HBO has teamed with filmmakers Martin Scorsese and Raoul Peck and novelist Russell Banks to tell the story of 19th century militant abolitionist John Brown, one of the most famous radicals in American history. Based on Banks' novel of the same name, Cloudsplitter centers on Brown's quest for political change and social justice that culminated in his ill-fated raid on Harpers Ferry. Peck, who gained critical acclaim for his 2000 feature Lumumba, is set to direct the telefilm and will executive produce with Scorsese and Banks. Peck is repped by WMA, manager Jonathan Brandstein and attorney Nina Shaw. Banks, whose writing credits also include the novels Affliction and Continental Drift, is repped by Endeavor. Scorsese is repped by the Firm. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Auto Focus

9 September 2002 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Auto Focus continues filmmaker Paul Schrader's fascination with how the male personality can disintegrate. It joins a number of films he has written or directed in which some mutant gene, some strange quirk in the emotional fabric, condemns a man to obsessive behavior he can neither fix nor abandon.

This time it's the story of actor and radio personality Bob Crane, whose hidden gene caused him to become addicted to sex and pornography, leading him into a murky world that ended with his murder in 1978.

Despite all of Schrader's films delving into this theme, the director's focus on this troubled character remains peculiarly fuzzy. Schrader seemingly has no point of view about Crane. We watch a life fall apart as one could observe an organism under a microscope -- with neither passion nor compassion. It comes awfully close to an exercise in morbidity.

Sony Pictures Classics will need all of Schrader's marquee power along with that of stars Greg Kinnear and Willem Dafoe to draw the curious to such downbeat fare. Crane's story does fascinate in a train-wreck sort of way. But the picture leaves one with a slightly sick, unclean feeling -- a feeling that Taxi Driver and his underrated, brilliant Affliction never did.

Crane first came to public attention with a morning drive-time radio show in Los Angeles in the late '50s, on which he played drums, goofed around with sound effects and conducted celebrity interviews. My own memory of that show includes an occasional editorial swipe at "risque" Hollywood movies. Hard to believe what followed.

Kinnear's Crane adopts an eager-to-please personality as a means to win friends and influence the right people to advance in show business. He lands the lead in the TV series Hogan's Heroes in 1965, quickly becoming a household name. The movie, written by Michael Gerbosi from Robert Graysmith's book "The Murder of Bob Crane," insists that fame doesn't go to his head; rather he develops an unhealthy palship with an electronic and photography whiz named John Carpenter (Dafoe).

John is on the cutting edge of early videography. Soon Crane not only has prototypical video equipment in his living room, he accompanies his new friend to Hollywood strip clubs to play the drums. Slowly but inexorably Crane gets drawn into the pre-AIDS netherworld of strippers, promiscuous sex and the kinkiness of recording his own sexual escapades. Not even divorce from his first wife (Rita Wilson) and marriage to a second (Maria Bello) slows him down. These obsessions rule his life and damage his career until he decides to go cold turkey -- which means breaking off his friendship with John. The next morning he is found bludgeoned to death in a motel room. Most evidence points to John as the killer, but he is never convicted.

Schrader and cinematographer Fred Murphy visually depict this downward spiral by opening the film with bright, cheery, saturated colors, then gradually shifting to monochromatic, desaturated tones that mirror the home videos Crane so loves. But Crane's emotional breakdown is not so easily charted.

Crane's is an unexamined life. When he does put the brakes to his obsessions, t his stems not from any moral or spiritual epiphany but simply a wise career move. He is forever Hogan, a smart, snappy guy with a crooked smile that makes sexual conquest easy.

Schrader never examines the two men's relationship in any fundamental way -- not their sexual identity, their emotional makeup nor the factors that bind them together.

The period details do work well. They remind us of an era when the Playboy philosophy was taken seriously and a life of sexual pursuit was seen as a kind of freedom rather than a kind of enslavement. It is here the cautionary tale works best, as an example of what happens when one realizes the wrong dream.

AUTO FOCUS

Sony Pictures Classics

Focus Puller Inc.

Credits:

Director: Paul Schrader

Writer: Michael Gerbosi

Based on the book "The Murder of Bob Crane" by: Robert Graysmith

Producers: Scott Alexander, Larry Karaszewski, Todd Rosken, Pat Dollard

Executive producers: Trevor Macy, Rick Hess, James Schamus

Director of photography: Fred Murphy

Production designer: James Chinlund

Music: Angelo Badalamenti

Costume designer: Julie Weiss

Editor: Kristina Boden

Cast:

Bob Crane: Greg Kinnear

John Carpenter: Willem Dafoe

Anne Crane: Rita Wilson

Patricia Crane: Maria Bello

Lenny: Rob Leibman

Running time -- 104 minutes

No MPAA rating

»

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

5 items from 2002


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners