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Rough Riders (TV Series 1997– ) Poster

(1997– )

Trivia

William Tiffany was real and did die in the battle, he was one of the sons of the New York Tiffanys which are still famous today.
Besides being a feared and well-respected lawman, Bucky O'Neill had also been an Indian scout and the Mayor of Prescott, Arizona, as well as a self-educated, very well-read and multi-lingual man (speaking French, Spanish and several Indian languages). He and Roosevelt became fast friends and spent much of their time in the campaign discussing military history, Indian customs and classic European literature.
The Sioux nation was so pleased with the depiction of Native Americans in the movie that they made John Milius an honorary tribe member.
The battles scenes were written from diaries and military dispatches, TR really did fall down from tripping over his sword.
The movie is dedicated "In Memory of Brian Keith: Actor, Marine, Raconteur 1921-1997".
Real casualties of the Rough Riders was 40% and many died from malaria, after the battle because the US would not let them back into the country, finally TR was able to get them back to Montauk New York in a quarantine camp. On the Library of Congress American Memory website, there are early Edison movies of them at the Montauk quarantine camp.
Brian Keith's last movie. He did his part a few weeks before his death. In an earlier John Milius movie, "The Wind and the Lion" Keith had played Teddy Roosevelt.
Col. Leonard Wood was a Medal of Honor holder from the Indian wars, and was great friends with TR. Wood was actually a medical doctor.
The true story of Lt. Pershing was that he was in charge of the Buffalo Solidiers with TR, he would later become General of the Army in World War I.
Hamilton Fish was a real person and did die, and just that way, the script was taken from a diary. The Fish family was a very famous and rich family of the times.
Tom Isbell actually sustained as many gunshot wounds in the Battle of Las Guasimas as was depicted in the film, and survived.
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Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri is named for Col. Leonard Wood. Col. Wood is played by Dale Dye, a retired US Marine Captain who also was a military advisor for the film.
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Indian Bob died two years later from tuberculosis.
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The song that the woman is singing as the Rough Riders are departing the train, and the music that is playing, is "Garry Owen", which is the official anthem of the U.S. Army's 7th Cavalry Regiment.
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The rifles used were real and from the 1927 movie about The Rough Riders.
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William Katt's war correspondent character Edward Marshall is partially based on real life journalist Richard Harding Davis.
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The woman singing "Garry Owen" is John Milius's wife.
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The stagecoach robbers are reading the newspaper and eating breakfast on a ranch in Alpine Texas, owned by a friend of John Milius.
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Roosevelt's encounter with Senator Mark Hanna and the French woman Mademoiselle Adler (who loses her flower to Roosevelt's gesticulations) at the dinner party is inspired by a real-life incident, although Roosevelt's wife and Colonel Wood were not present. Much of Hanna's dialogue in the scene - "We'd be at war with half the world if you were President!" - was not actually said to Roosevelt, but to Adler after they left the party (as recorded in her diary).
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Like other characters in the movie, the character of Craig Wadsworth is also based on a real person of the same name. However, he was not a polo player; he was a steeplechase rider.
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Milius completed the film in 50 shooting days.
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The role of Teddy Roosevelt was offered to Stephen Lang. Lang gracefully declined due to the low salary.
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Adam Storke, who plays Stephen Crane, was 35 when he played the part, a full 10 years older than Crane actually was at the time.
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Stephan Crane the real author of the Civil War's Red badge of Courge, died two years after these events, however Edward Marshall who was wounded lived for 12 more years.
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There are land crabs in Cuba that might be attracted to a 19th century field hospital, but the crab that Nash kicks away from his leg wound is a coastal blue crab that would *never* leave the water voluntarily.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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