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(1996)

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Brad Renfro: Inside the Actor's Shocking Death at 25 and Quick Rise to Fame

  • PEOPLE.com
Brad Renfro: Inside the Actor's Shocking Death at 25 and Quick Rise to Fame
It’s been nearly a decade since the tragic death of former child actor Brad Renfro. During his too-short career he made over 20 movies, the last one being 2008’s The Informers, where he starred alongside Billy Bob Thornton and Winona Ryder. The Apt Pupil star was a gifted actor who battled several off-screen demons, which ultimately ended the life of the 25-year-old.

A Star on the Rise

The Knoxville, Tennessee native was only 10-years-old when he was discovered by director Joel Schumacher to play Mark Sway, a young witness in a Mafia case, in his 1994 movie The Client. In the film,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Sleepers: Revisiting an Incredible Movie and Book

Sleepers is a 1996 film that is based off the true-life story of four boys who were brutalized by the juvenile justice system in New York. This film was considered one of the best in 1996. It featured a powerful cast that includes Brad Pitt, Dustin Hoffman, Jason Patric, Robert De Niro, Minnie Driver, Billy Crudup, and plenty of others. Sleepers was directed and produced by Barry Levinson. Critics gave the film overall favorable reviews and it was well received by audiences. The box office revenue for Sleepers was $165 million and the budget for the film was $44 million. 

Sleepers: Revisiting an Incredible Movie and Book
See full article at TVovermind.com »

The 15 greatest John Williams scores you've forgotten about

Sean Wilson Aug 4, 2017

Yes, Star Wars. But what about all the great John Williams scores from less famous movies? Here are 15 of them...

Cinema's most esteemed and popular film composer, John Williams, turned 85 this year (you might have seen the recent spectacular BBC Proms concert in his honour). Careers don't come more astonishing than that of Williams, nominated for 50 Academy Awards which puts him second only to Walt Disney for the most ever.

See related  What does Iron Fist tell us about Marvel's Defenders? The Defenders: recapping Netflix's Marvel universe so far The Defenders: brand new images released

However it's all too tempting to boil Williams' career down to the more obvious highlights: Star Wars, the Indy trilogy, Superman, E.T., Jurassic Park and the like. In truth, he's a far more versatile composer than many like to give him credit for, and he's much more than just a big themes guy.
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Scaffolding', Hong Sang-soo triumph in Jerusalem

  • ScreenDaily
'Scaffolding', Hong Sang-soo triumph in Jerusalem
Festival reveals the award winners from its 34th edition.

Scaffolding has won the best Israeli feature film prize at the 34th edition of the Jerusalem Film Festival.

The debut feature from director Matan Yair – produced by rising Israeli production outfit Green Productions – takes home a prize worth $28,000 (100,000 Ils).

Scaffolding also scooped the best actor prize for debutant Asher Lax and an honorary mention in the best cinematography category for DoP Bartosz Bieniek.

A jury consisting of Elle producer Saïd Ben Saïd, artist Yael Bartana, cinematographer Agnès Godard and Cíntia Gíl, director of film festival Doclisboa, said of the film: “For a film that combines the reality of a group of teenagers and the will of questioning cinema and the role of filmmaking. For its capacity of capturing the tenderness sometimes behind these kids’ violence, their capacity for love, their surprising imagination, in a society that places them in a marginal role forever.”

The festival
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Kingdom’ and ‘American Gods’ Star Jonathan Tucker Bled for His Art, and That’s Just the Beginning

‘Kingdom’ and ‘American Gods’ Star Jonathan Tucker Bled for His Art, and That’s Just the Beginning
When people say they’ll give you everything they’ve got, few mean it the way Jonathan Tucker does. Blood, sweat, and tears only begin to describe what he puts into his work, and he’s literally given all three to “Kingdom” — you can watch him do it.

The sweat and the tears are to be expected when portraying a fighter, as Tucker has done for nearly 40 episodes on the Audience Network original series (now airing and set to end this year). Long before he stole the opening scene of “American Gods,” the young actor from “The Virgin Suicides,” “Sleepers,” “The Black Donnellys” and “Justified,” has embodied the physical and emotional requisites of an impassioned tough guy. He trained every day on the “Kingdom” set’s functioning gym, and he’s wept repeatedly on camera during Jay Kulina’s many vulnerable moments.

But the blood, well, there’s a story there.

Before Tucker gets into sharing why he sought medical advice from a fight choreographer instead of the recommended emergency room doctor, it’s important to know something about Tucker: The man respects his art. No — the man really respects his art.

“We’re storytellers; that’s the reason why our species has succeeded so extraordinarily,” Tucker said in a recent interview. “We’re able to tell and subscribe to stories in a potent and unique way. They’re important for our culture, but also for our species, and we have to take that responsibility seriously as storytellers because these stories mean something to people.”

Read More: ‘Kingdom’ Season 3 Review: Nick Jonas Finishes Strong in a Drama That Deserves More Viewers — and More Time

When you speak to Tucker, either over the phone or on set, he’s relaxed and well-reasoned; he speaks with passion, but he’s not overly indulgent. You get the sense praise given is praise earned, and he’s only willing to exalt his co-workers — especially the crew on “Kingdom.” He sees acting as a “luxury” and feels privileged to be able to hone his skills during downtime on set, while producers, directors, gaffers, lighting technicians, and more crew members handle the real problems.

But it’s not that he’s lazy. Tucker firmly believes in being as prepared as humanly possible before coming to work. “Life is too short for us to warm up,” Tucker said. “You have to do the warm-up on your own. When you come to set, it’s time to put everything on the line.”

Such quotes could sound cliched if he didn’t back them up. For instance — regarding the day he shed more blood than one should for a TV show — he said “I was completely and utterly obsessed with finishing this fight.” And you know he’s serious. He wasn’t there for himself, he was there for the show, for the art, for the story, and they were going to get this scene — even if it meant forever scarring the face that supports his career.

The short version of the story is that Tucker got clocked, hard, right in the face by a real Mma fighter, and he needed stitches before they could finish shooting a pivotal scene. But the long story, which takes a bit of prying to get out of Tucker, is much better.

“In that scene, I was fighting Jay ‘Thoroughbred’ Hieron, who is a terrific Mma star and weights probably 35 to 40 pounds more than I do — at least — because in the story, I was fighting significantly above my weight class,” Tucker said. “In the scene, he picks me up and puts me down on the mat and then he puts me in a position called ‘full mount,’ which means both of his knees are over my shoulders or over the sides of my arms. So he’s fully mounting me, and he comes down with an elbow. He puts that elbow into the ether of the heavens and then drops it right down into my head.”

Tucker blamed “a miscommunication” between himself and Hieron for what happened next.

“He opened my eye up a good three inches — a good gash, but it looked a lot worse than it ultimately ended up being when the stitches went in at Cedar Sinai at one in the morning.”

The “miscommunication” happened before lunch, so why did it take so long for Tucker to get stitches for the bloody gash in his face? He had to finish the fight.

Read More: Giancarlo Esposito is Invisible on ‘Dear White People,’ But It’s His Best Performance of the Year

“I spent all this time rehearsing this scene, and the fight choreography is really what gives our show street credentials for so many of the Mma fans,” Tucker said, again crediting the crew, trainers, and choreographers. But he wanted to help build that legitimacy, too.

“I did not want to go to the hospital. I wanted to finish the scene up,” Tucker said. “They said ‘super glue’ and they super glued my eye closed as much as they could.”

While Tucker did not elaborate on who “they” were, a representative for the series said it was Tucker who refused to leave — knowing how many problems it would cause the production for him to be gone for hours on end — and that he asked the Mma fighters on set what they would do in a real-life fight. One told him he’d use super glue to close the wound, and no one could talk Tucker out of doing just that.

“The problem, though, is that it would pop open from time to time when I was exerting myself physically — the blood flow pops the glue,” Tucker said. “That happened a few times, which was pretty shocking for a few people on our set. [But] it gave me just a bit more information to put into the files for my character and to the show.”

When pressed about whether or not he would have done the same thing for any role, any show, any team of storytellers, Tucker said he doesn’t want to work on projects where he’d feel Ok about “leaving my crew behind.” But first he tried to think of a scenario in which he would’ve left the “Kingdom” set.

“It wasn’t like my leg was broken,” Tucker said, before immediately reconsidering. “Even if my leg was broken, it wasn’t like I was going to lose my arm or something. Having some stitches on my face — as a male [actor] — is not a problem.”

Moreover, Tucker saw the moment as a way to prove to his collaborators how seriously he took his part in the story.

“Everybody knows I’ll literally bleed for this character and their jobs,” he said. “I’ll bleed for this show, just like I’ll ask you guys to make sacrifices on your end. So it was a good thing.”

Yet after all this — all the training, all his physical efforts to bring the production together as a team, and for his complete dedication to earning the respect of the Mma community — these aspects aren’t the most remarkable elements of his onscreen performance. The series is realistic in a way that keeps you from questioning the legitimacy of these fighters, which is exactly the effect Tucker described.

And that allows audiences to marvel at his intimate, honest scenes outside the ring. Much like “Friday Night Lights” wasn’t really about football, “Kingdom” is about the men and women of their sport more than the sport itself. Tucker’s range extends from quiet intensity to open-hearted anguish; from sweat counted in beads to tears rolling like a stream.

For the blood, Tucker has a simple rule to live by:

“Life throws elbows at you, and you’ve got to superglue the wounds together.”

Kingdom” airs new episodes of its final season every Wednesday at 8 p.m. on Audience Network.

Stay on top of the latest TV news! Sign up for our TV email newsletter here.

Related stories'American Gods' Review: Season 1's Finale Is a Beautiful Sensory Nightmare That Finally Answers the Show's Biggest QuestionHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional PowerGiancarlo Esposito is Invisible on 'Dear White People,' But It's His Best Performance of the Year
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Kingdom’ and ‘American Gods’ Star Jonathan Tucker Bled for His Art, and That’s Just the Beginning

  • Indiewire
‘Kingdom’ and ‘American Gods’ Star Jonathan Tucker Bled for His Art, and That’s Just the Beginning
When people say they’ll give you everything they’ve got, few mean it the way Jonathan Tucker does. Blood, sweat, and tears only begin to describe what he puts into his work, and he’s literally given all three to “Kingdom” — you can watch him do it.

The sweat and the tears are to be expected when portraying a fighter, as Tucker has done for nearly 40 episodes on the Audience Network original series (now airing and set to end this year). Long before he stole the opening scene of “American Gods,” the young actor from “The Virgin Suicides,” “Sleepers,” “The Black Donnellys” and “Justified,” has embodied the physical and emotional requisites of an impassioned tough guy. He trained every day on the “Kingdom” set’s functioning gym, and he’s wept repeatedly on camera during Jay Kulina’s many vulnerable moments.

But the blood, well, there’s a story there.

Before Tucker gets into sharing why he sought medical advice from a fight choreographer instead of the recommended emergency room doctor, it’s important to know something about Tucker: The man respects his art. No — the man really respects his art.

“We’re storytellers; that’s the reason why our species has succeeded so extraordinarily,” Tucker said in a recent interview. “We’re able to tell and subscribe to stories in a potent and unique way. They’re important for our culture, but also for our species, and we have to take that responsibility seriously as storytellers because these stories mean something to people.”

Read More: ‘Kingdom’ Season 3 Review: Nick Jonas Finishes Strong in a Drama That Deserves More Viewers — and More Time

When you speak to Tucker, either over the phone or on set, he’s relaxed and well-reasoned; he speaks with passion, but he’s not overly indulgent. You get the sense praise given is praise earned, and he’s only willing to exalt his co-workers — especially the crew on “Kingdom.” He sees acting as a “luxury” and feels privileged to be able to hone his skills during downtime on set, while producers, directors, gaffers, lighting technicians, and more crew members handle the real problems.

But it’s not that he’s lazy. Tucker firmly believes in being as prepared as humanly possible before coming to work. “Life is too short for us to warm up,” Tucker said. “You have to do the warm-up on your own. When you come to set, it’s time to put everything on the line.”

Such quotes could sound cliched if he didn’t back them up. For instance — regarding the day he shed more blood than one should for a TV show — he said “I was completely and utterly obsessed with finishing this fight.” And you know he’s serious. He wasn’t there for himself, he was there for the show, for the art, for the story, and they were going to get this scene — even if it meant forever scarring the face that supports his career.

The short version of the story is that Tucker got clocked, hard, right in the face by a real Mma fighter, and he needed stitches before they could finish shooting a pivotal scene. But the long story, which takes a bit of prying to get out of Tucker, is much better.

“In that scene, I was fighting Jay ‘Thoroughbred’ Hieron, who is a terrific Mma star and weights probably 35 to 40 pounds more than I do — at least — because in the story, I was fighting significantly above my weight class,” Tucker said. “In the scene, he picks me up and puts me down on the mat and then he puts me in a position called ‘full mount,’ which means both of his knees are over my shoulders or over the sides of my arms. So he’s fully mounting me, and he comes down with an elbow. He puts that elbow into the ether of the heavens and then drops it right down into my head.”

Tucker blamed “a miscommunication” between himself and Hieron for what happened next.

“He opened my eye up a good three inches — a good gash, but it looked a lot worse than it ultimately ended up being when the stitches went in at Cedar Sinai at one in the morning.”

The “miscommunication” happened before lunch, so why did it take so long for Tucker to get stitches for the bloody gash in his face? He had to finish the fight.

Read More: Giancarlo Esposito is Invisible on ‘Dear White People,’ But It’s His Best Performance of the Year

“I spent all this time rehearsing this scene, and the fight choreography is really what gives our show street credentials for so many of the Mma fans,” Tucker said, again crediting the crew, trainers, and choreographers. But he wanted to help build that legitimacy, too.

“I did not want to go to the hospital. I wanted to finish the scene up,” Tucker said. “They said ‘super glue’ and they super glued my eye closed as much as they could.”

While Tucker did not elaborate on who “they” were, a representative for the series said it was Tucker who refused to leave — knowing how many problems it would cause the production for him to be gone for hours on end — and that he asked the Mma fighters on set what they would do in a real-life fight. One told him he’d use super glue to close the wound, and no one could talk Tucker out of doing just that.

“The problem, though, is that it would pop open from time to time when I was exerting myself physically — the blood flow pops the glue,” Tucker said. “That happened a few times, which was pretty shocking for a few people on our set. [But] it gave me just a bit more information to put into the files for my character and to the show.”

When pressed about whether or not he would have done the same thing for any role, any show, any team of storytellers, Tucker said he doesn’t want to work on projects where he’d feel Ok about “leaving my crew behind.” But first he tried to think of a scenario in which he would’ve left the “Kingdom” set.

“It wasn’t like my leg was broken,” Tucker said, before immediately reconsidering. “Even if my leg was broken, it wasn’t like I was going to lose my arm or something. Having some stitches on my face — as a male [actor] — is not a problem.”

Moreover, Tucker saw the moment as a way to prove to his collaborators how seriously he took his part in the story.

“Everybody knows I’ll literally bleed for this character and their jobs,” he said. “I’ll bleed for this show, just like I’ll ask you guys to make sacrifices on your end. So it was a good thing.”

Yet after all this — all the training, all his physical efforts to bring the production together as a team, and for his complete dedication to earning the respect of the Mma community — these aspects aren’t the most remarkable elements of his onscreen performance. The series is realistic in a way that keeps you from questioning the legitimacy of these fighters, which is exactly the effect Tucker described.

And that allows audiences to marvel at his intimate, honest scenes outside the ring. Much like “Friday Night Lights” wasn’t really about football, “Kingdom” is about the men and women of their sport more than the sport itself. Tucker’s range extends from quiet intensity to open-hearted anguish; from sweat counted in beads to tears rolling like a stream.

For the blood, Tucker has a simple rule to live by:

“Life throws elbows at you, and you’ve got to superglue the wounds together.”

Kingdom” airs new episodes of its final season every Wednesday at 8 p.m. on Audience Network.

Stay on top of the latest TV news! Sign up for our TV email newsletter here.

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See full article at Indiewire »

Jason Patric Signs With ICM Partners (Exclusive)

Jason Patric Signs With ICM Partners (Exclusive)
Jason Patric has signed with ICM Partners, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned.

The veteran actor (Sleepers, The Lost Boys) most recently appeared as a legal officer for the U.S. Army opposite Alden Ehrenreich, Tye Sheridan, Jennifer Aniston and Toni Collette in Alexandre Moors’ Iraq War drama The Yellow Birds, which premiered at Sundance in January. He also starred last summer in season two of Fox’s supernatural drama Wayward Pines, making his series-regular debut.

Patric is now shooting the independent World War II drama Burning at Both Ends opposite Cary Elwes, Matthew Modine and Judd Hirsch.

He continues...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Michael Ballhaus, 'Goodfellas' cinematographer, dies aged 81

  • ScreenDaily
Michael Ballhaus, 'Goodfellas' cinematographer, dies aged 81
German enjoyed extensive collaborations with Martin Scorsese, Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

Michael Ballhaus, the German cinematographer and frequent collaborator of Martin Scorsese and Rainer Werner Fassbinder, died on Tuesday in Berlin following a short illness. He was 81.

Ballhaus earned three Oscar nominations for his work on Scorsese’s Gangs Of New York, Steve Kloves’s The Fabulous Baker Boys, and James L. Brooks’s Broadcast News.

He was born in Germany on August 5, 1935, and built up an extensive roster of credits for Rainer Werner Fassbinder such as Whity in 1971, The Marriage Of Maria Braun and Satan’s Brew.

He shot Quiz Show for Robert Redford, Bram Stoker’s Dracula for Francis Ford Coppola, Sleepers for Barry Levinson, Working Girl and Postcards From The Edge by Mike Nichols, Under The Cherry Moon for Prince, among many others.

Besides Goodfellas, Ballhaus’s Scorsese credits include Gangs Of New York, The Departed, The Age Of Innocence, The Color Of Money, and After
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Robert De Niro Is ‘The Wizard Of Lies’ In New Trailer For HBO’s Bernie Madoff Pic

  • The Playlist
Robert De Niro‘s last few movies were the dramedy “The Comedian,” the boxing pic “Hands Of Stone,” and the raunchy comedy “Dirty Grandpa,” all of which were poorly received at best. But this spring, it looks like he has a role and film worth his talents with “The Wizard Of Lies.”

Read More: Netflix, Amazon, ‘The Irishman’ & The Academy: Oscars In The Age Of Streaming

Helmed by Barry Levinson, who has directed De Niro previously in “Sleepers,” “Wag The Dog,” and “What Just Happened,” the HBO movie will tell the story of Bernie Madoff, the respected financial titan whose world — and those of his clients — came tumbling down when it was revealed he was running a Ponzi scheme.

Continue reading Robert De Niro Is ‘The Wizard Of Lies’ In New Trailer For HBO’s Bernie Madoff Pic at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Michael Ballhaus, Who Lensed ‘Goodfellas’ and ‘The Departed,’ Dies at 81

  • Indiewire
Michael Ballhaus, Who Lensed ‘Goodfellas’ and ‘The Departed,’ Dies at 81
Michael Ballhaus, the revered cinematographer who brought his distinct visual sense to the works of Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola and Rainer Werner Fassbinder, has died at 81. The German director of photography earned three Academy Award nominations throughout his career, which spanned more than half a century. Last year he was recognized with a Golden Bear for lifetime achievement at the Berlin Film Festival.

Among his best-known films were Fassbinder’s “The Marriage of Maria Braun,” James L. Brooks’ “Broadcast News” (which earned him his first Oscar nod) and “The Departed,” one of several collaborations with Scorsese — Ballhaus also lensed “After Hours,” “The Last Temptations of Christ,” “Goodfellas” and “The Age of Innocence.” He began his career in Germany, first coming to attention for the many films he made with Fassbinder, before making his way to Hollywood.

Once there, he also worked with Mike Nichols (“Working Girl,” “Postcards From the Edge”), Robert Redford (“Quiz Show”) and Barry Levinson (“Sleepers”), among many others. Ballhaus was born in Berlin on August 5, 1935. His cause of death has yet to be confirmed.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related storiesBerlinale 2016 to Honor Scorsese, Nichols, Fassbinder Cinematographer Michael Ballhaus'Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them' Sequel: Jude Law Will Put on His Robe and Wizard Hat to Play Young Dumbledore'Thor: Ragnarok': 5 Indie Fight Scenes That Prove Taika Waititi Is the Perfect Director for the New Marvel Movie
See full article at Indiewire »

Random Roles: Billy Crudup won’t tell us which movie he got fired from

  • The AV Club
Welcome to Random Roles, wherein we talk to actors about the characters who defined their careers. The catch: They don’t know beforehand what roles we’ll ask them to talk about.

The actor: Billy Crudup’s considerable résumé is filled with prestige projects. This illustrious tradition began when he started out two decades ago in Barry Levinson’s Sleepers, starring alongside Dustin Hoffman and Robert De Niro, and he hasn’t slowed down since. Along the way he’s taken on iconic roles like Almost Famous’ Russell, Watchmen’s Dr. Manhattan, and William in Big Fish. You’ve also heard his melodious voice announce MasterCard punchline “priceless” for several years. At this point in his career, Crudup seems able to pick and choose his prestige projects, racking up appearances in a number of recent Oscar nominees. His latest movie, 1 Mile To You, comes out on video-on-demand April 7 ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Jason Patric Is Legal Parent of IVF-Conceived Child, Appeals Court Rules

Actor Jason Patric is legally the parent of his son, for whom he donated sperm to ex-girlfriend Danielle Schreiber in 2009 — but he may not be entitled to custody.

California's 2nd District was asked to consider — again — what legal rights Patric has as the biological parent of a child born through in vitro fertilization, and the decision brings mixed news for the Sleepers star.

Patric's case first appeared before this court in 2014, after a family law court ruled that relevant code prevented him from establishing parentage. The appeals court reversed the ruling, finding that...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Billy Crudup To Play Ezra Miller’s Dad in “The Flash’

  • The Playlist
Billy Crudup’s had a strange old career. The actor broke through, after impressive stage work, in “Sleepers” two decades ago, and immediately became one of Hollywood’s hottest properties, cementing that with a memorable turn in “Almost Famous.” But he’s one of those actors who seemed to resist stardom, reportedly turning down the chance to play […]

The post Billy Crudup To Play Ezra Miller’s Dad in “The Flash’ appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Game of Silence’ Review: A Brutal But Often Gripping Search for Justice

  • The Wrap
‘Game of Silence’ Review: A Brutal But Often Gripping Search for Justice
If you missed out on Tuesday night’s sneak preview of NBC’s new series “Game of Silence” because you believed it to be another terribly named reality show, you’d be forgiven. Poor title choice aside, the reality showcased in the incoming drama is much more horrifying than anything a non-scripted series could provide. It’s worth watching when it moves to its regular time slot tonight. Based on a Turkish series that was inspired by the Brad Pitt film “Sleepers,” “Game of Silence” revolves around four childhood friends whose innocent antics landed them nine months in a juvenile detention center where terrible,
See full article at The Wrap »

Mark Wahlberg's Patriots' Day Has Assembled An A-List Cast

Revolving around the police investigation into the Boston Marathon bombing of 2013, Patriots' Day promises to be packed full of drama and emotion. They.re going to need a rather impressive cast to do this story justice, and director Peter Berg and lead star Mark Wahlberg have managed to assemble just that. In fact, Patriots' Day.s ensemble is one of the best that.s been pulled together in years. Obviously, Mark Wahlberg will lead the line for Patriots' Day, in which he.ll play Sgt. Tommy Saunders. But the rest of the cast has now been confirmed, and it.s wall-to-wall talent of the highest order. Don.t believe me? Just take a look through the call sheet below. Every film is instantly improved by adding Kevin Bacon. 2015 helped to remind the world just how supremely talented the Footloose and Sleepers actor is, as he appeared in the underrated Cop
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Berlinale ’16: Cinematographer Michael Ballhaus receives lifetime achievement award

Michael Ballhaus, Berlin 2016. Image The Hollywood News/ Heathside Media

Here at Berlinale, a host of Martin Scorsese films have been showing at various venue across the city. The likes of Gangs Of New York, The Departed, The Age Of Innocence, and Goodfellas have screened to German and international film fans for a very specific reason. One thing ties all of these films together, and it isn’t just Martin Scorsese. Michael Ballhaus, the Berlin-bord cinematographer shot all of them, and this year at the 66th International Berlin Film Festival, he receives the honorary Golden Bear to make his fifty-plus year career behind the camera.

Ballhaus actually had his first meeting with Scorsese here in the city. Speaking to the news agency dpa, about his receiving of the special Golden Bear at Berlinale, Ballhaus said; “I’m especially happy about this award.”

“I’ve seen many wonderful films here. 1980 was my
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Jason Patric to Star in Wayward Pines Season 2

  • DailyDead
This summer, Fox's Wayward Pines is back for a second season with a star-studded cast which now includes Jason Patric (The Lost Boys, Narc).

Press Release: Jason Patric (“Rush,” “Narc”) has been cast in a leading role in Wayward Pines, the hit psychological thriller event series returning for a second season this summer on Fox. Patric will portray Dr. Theo Yedlin, a confident, driven surgeon whose leadership skills will prove invaluable to the residents of Wayward Pines.

From executive producer M. Night Shyamalan (“The Sixth Sense,” “The Visit”) and based on the world created by author Blake Crouch in his international best-selling series of books, the 10-episode, second season will pick up after the shocking events of Season One, with the residents of Wayward Pines battling against the iron-fisted rule of the First Generation. Dr. Theo Yedlin – a new resident of Wayward Pines – awakens from suspended animation and finds himself
See full article at DailyDead »

Wayward Pines: Jason Patric to Headline Season 2 of Fox Drama

Wayward Pines: Jason Patric to Headline Season 2 of Fox Drama
Pack your bags, Jason Patric: You’re on your way to Wayward Pines.

The film vet, whose credits include The Lost Boys and Sleepers, has been tapped to star in Season 2 of Fox’s mind-bending drama, the network announced Thursday.

Related2016 Renewal Scorecard: What’s Coming Back? What’s Getting Cancelled? What’s on the Bubble?

The show’s sophomore run will pick up where Season 1 left off, when a new arrival in the titular Idaho town finds himself in the middle of a serious rebellion, as the residents, led by the bratty First Generation, battle over how to preserve the endangered human race.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Louis Digiaimo, Casting Director for ‘The Godfather,’ ‘The Exorcist,’ Dies at 77

Louis Digiaimo, Casting Director for ‘The Godfather,’ ‘The Exorcist,’ Dies at 77
Emmy winner Louis Digiaimo, whose first credit in a long career as a casting director was ‘The Godfather,” died December 19 in Oakland, New Jersey. He was 77 and had reportedly suffered a stroke earlier this year.

Digiaimo went on to cast films including “The Exorcist,” “Good Morning, Vietnam,” “Rain Man,” “Thelma & Louise,” “Donnie Brasco” (which he also produced), “Hannibal” and “Gladiator.”

Digiaimo, who was sometimes credited as Lou Digiaimo, had fruitful working relationships with Barry Levinson and Ridley Scott. For the former he cast “Tin Men,” with Richard Dreyfuss and Danny DeVito; “Good Morning, Vietnam” (1987), with Robin Williams; “Rain Man,” with Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman; and “Sleepers,” with Kevin Bacon, Robert De Niro and Hoffman.

Digiaimo served as casting director on NBC’s highly regarded crime drama “Homicide: Life on the Street” (on which Levinson was an executive producer), drawing three Emmy nominations and winning in 1998.

For Ridley Scott, Digiaimo
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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