Ridicule (1996) - News Poster

(1996)

News

Harvey Weinstein’s Accusers: The Growing List of Women Alleging Sexual Assault & Harassment

Harvey Weinstein’s Accusers: The Growing List of Women Alleging Sexual Assault & Harassment
The New Yorker published an expose on movie mogul Harvey Weinstein on Tuesday that alleges the producer raped three women. The report follows an Oct. 5 New York Times investigation documenting three decades of sexual harassment allegations against Weinstein.

Ronan Farrow spent 10 months interviewing 13 women who claim they were assaulted or harassed by Weinstein. The New Yorker article contains on-the-record accounts from actresses who reported Weinstein forcibly received or performed sexual acts on women. More women, including Gwyneth Paltrow and Angelina Jolie came forward on Tuesday to share their accounts with the New York Times.

Here are the women who have gone on the record with their stories:

Tomi-Ann Roberts (1984)

When Roberts was a 20-year-old junior in college, she waited tables in New York and hoped to start a career acting. One of her customers, Weinstein, urged her to audition for a movie. He sent her scripts and asked her to meet him where he was staying to discuss
See full article at Variety - Film News »

French Actor Jean Rochefort Dies at 87

French Actor Jean Rochefort Dies at 87
Perhaps forever to be known as “The Best Don Quixote Who Never Was,” French actor Jean Rochefort has died at age 87, according to Afp.

Rochefort was hospitalized in August and died overnight on Sunday, Afp reported, according to Deadline.

One of the most loved, iconoclastic figures of French cinema in the last 70 years, Rochefort first began appearing in films in 1955.

Both a romantic leading man and character actor, Rochefort was a three time César honoree equally skilled in dramatic and comedic roles. He starred in a number of successful, critically praised French films which attracted international audiences including Ridicule and The Hairdresser’s Husband.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Jean Rochefort Dies: French Actor Was Famously to Appear in ‘Don Quixote’

Jean Rochefort Dies: French Actor Was Famously to Appear in ‘Don Quixote’
French actor Jean Rochefort, who rose to prominence in the 1960s and was equally adept at arthouse dramas and crowdpleasing comedies, appearing in “The Tall Blond Man with One Black Shoe” and “Pardon Mon Affaire” as well as Patrice Leconte’s “The Hairdresser’s Husband” and “Ridicule,” has died. He was 87.

Rochefort died in a Paris hospital on Sunday night. The actor’s death was confirmed by his daughter Clemence, one of his five children.

Rochefort last starred opposite Sandrine Kiberlain in Philippe Le Guay’s “Florida,” which world-premiered at Locarno in 2015 and was nominated for Variety Piazza Grande Award.

His potential English-language breakthrough, as the Don Quixote character in Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” was famously abandoned during production. The struggles to get this feature off the ground were later memorably chronicled in the documentary “Lost in La Mancha.”

A pillar of French cinema, Rochefort made his leap into the limelight in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: All Rights Scores Fan Bingbing’s ‘Portrait’

Cannes: All Rights Scores Fan Bingbing’s ‘Portrait’
Paris- and Hong Hong-based All Rights Entertainment is handling international sales on “The Lady in the Portrait,” the historical romantic drama that Cannes recently added to the festival program as a tribute to Chinese jury member Fan Bingbing.

Fan plays the 18th century Chinese empress Ulanara at the moment she meets Jesuit Jean Denis Attiret (played by Melvil Poupaud) one of the official painters to the imperial court. The film plays on the romantic tensions between the two, the rigid court etiquette and the most extreme cultural differences between East and West.

“Portrait” was directed by Charles de Meaux (“Stretch,” “Shimkent Hotel”) and written by de Meaux and Michel Fessler (“March of the Penguins,” “Ridicule”). It will play in Cannes on May 24. Production was by Evergrande Pictures, Sfdc and Anna Sanders Films, in association with Back Up Films.

All Rights has enjoyed initial Cannes success with sales of “Hostiles,” an
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Margot Robbie to Portray Queen Elizabeth I in Josie Rourke’s “Mary Queen of Scots”

Margot Robbie in “Whiskey Tango Foxtrot”: Paramount Pictures/Frank Masi

Margot Robbie is swapping her Harley Quinn pigtails for Queen Elizabeth I’s crown. The Hollywood Reporter writes that the “Suicide Squad” actress will play Queen Elizabeth in Josie Rourke’s “Mary Queen of Scots.” “Brooklyn’s” Saoirse Ronan is set to star as the titular Mary Stuart, Elizabeth’s cousin.

Written by Penelope Skinner (“How I Live Now”) and Michael Hirst (“The Tudors”), the biopic “will take on the historical family rivalry between Elizabeth and Mary, when the latter attempted to overthrow her cousin’s seat on the English thrown,” THR reports.

The Working Title and Focus Features film will be produced by Liza Chasin, Tim Bevan, and Eric Fellner. The trio previously collaborated on the Stephen Hawking biopic “The Theory of Everything.”

In a Better World” director Susanne Bier was originally linked to “Mary Queen of Scots.” She spoke to Women and Hollywood in 2014 about the project and her collaboration with Skinner. “Mary was very young when she became queen. Basically, she was queen from age five, but she became a real queen when she was 17,” Bier told us. “And we wanted to have that because part of the excitement is to have that young girl have the power of a queen. That was so exciting.”

We don’t know why Bier is no longer involved in the project, but we’re happy that another female director was selected to take the reins. Best known as a theater director, Rourke has previously helmed productions of “Much Ado About Nothing,” “The Vote,” “Les Liaisons Dangereuses,” and “Saint Joan.” According to Rourke’s IMDb page, “Mary Queen of Scots” marks her feature directorial debut.

The conflict between Elizabeth I and Mary Stuart has been explored before in the 1971 Vanessa Redgrave-starrer “Mary, Queen of Scots,” and the 2013 “Mary Queen of Scots,” starring Camille Rutherford (“Blue Is the Warmest Color.” “Elizabeth,” the 1998 film toplined by Cate Blanchett, touched upon the hostility between Elizabeth I and Mary Stuart’s mother, Mary of Guise (Fanny Ardant, “Ridicule”).

Robbie has a number of projects on her plate. She stars in “I, Tonya,” a biopic a comedy about controversial Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding currently in post-production. Among Robbie’s other upcoming films are “Marian,” a new iteration of Robin Hood folklore, a spinoff for her “Suicide Squad” character Harley Quinn and other female villains of the DC Comics universe, “Queen of the Air,” in which she’ll play a trapeze artist, and “Beautiful Things,” a thriller set in a zoo.

Ronan is also plenty busy. The Oscar-nominated actress has roles in Greta Gerwig’s solo directorial debut “Lady Bird” and an adaptation of Ian McEwan’s “On Chesil Beach.” The “Atonement” actress is also set to play a refugee in a big screen adaptation of Camilla Gibb’s best-selling 2007 novel “Sweetness in the Belly.”

Margot Robbie to Portray Queen Elizabeth I in Josie Rourke’s “Mary Queen of Scots” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Ventana Sur: Wide Takes ‘Pseudonym’ (Exclusive)

Montevideo – Driving into debuts from Gallic directors, and also acquiring with an eye on future VOD markets, Wide Management, the Paris-based sales-production-distribution house, has acquired world sales rights to “Pseudonym,” produced by France’s Diabolo Films and La Petite Reine, the Academy Award-winning producer of “The Artist.”

Paris-based Diabolo, run by Gilles Podesta, teamed with Thomas Langmann’s La Petite Reine, which won fice Oscars for “The Artist,” including best picture, on toon musical “The Suicide Shop,” from Patrice Leconte (“Ridicule,” “The Hairdresser’s Husband”) that opened France’s Annecy Animation Festival in 2011. Destiny Distribution releases “Pseudonym” in France on March 9.

Also produced by Paris’ Lorette Productions, “Pseudonym” will be talked up to buyers by Wide’s Frederic Gentet at next week’s Ventana Sur where Wide will also screen one of its highest-profile titles, “2 Nights Till Morning,” which plays in Ventana Sur’s European Screenings.

A cautionary thriller for the Internet age,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mipcom: Upside Distribution Picks Up ‘Reset’ With Benjamin Millepied

Cannes — Upside Distribution has acquired international rights to Thierry Demaiziere and Alban Teurlai’s “Reset,” a 90-minute documentary starring Benjamin Millepied, the choreographer of Natalie Portman starrer “Black Swan” and the current topper of the Paris Opera Ballet.

Demaiziere and Teurlai have followed Millepied through the creative process of his first ballet for the Paris Opera which took place Sept. 25.

Thierry Demaizière, Alban Teurlai and Stéphanie Schorter at Falabracks are producing with Paris’ National Opera National. Canal Plus will air it in December.

Studiocanal is handling the rights to the docu for the U.K. and Germany.

Upside Distribution has also nabbed sales on “Night At The Wax Museum,” a documentary helmed by French acclaimed director Patrice Leconte (“Ridicule”). Skopia is producing the doc which will air in December on pubcaster France 5.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Exclusive Interview: Director Patrick Brice and producer Naomi Scott for ‘The Overnight’

The Overnight

In The Overnight, La eccentrics Kurt and Charlotte (Jason Schwartzman and Judith Godrèche) play host to recent arrivals Alex and Emily (Adam Scott and Taylor Schilling, above) for an evening neither couple will likely forget. The second feature from writer/director Patrick Brice, The Overnight, which marked its premier at Sundance, emerges as a funny, risqué and raw take on thirty-something sexual frustration and parenthood.

We met with Brice and Naomi Scott (wife of Adam Scott, who produced the film in conjunction with the Duplass Brothers), at the Four Seasons Hotel in Los Angeles.

Thn: Tell us – what was the genesis of The Overnight?

Patrick Brice: I had made this other film, Creep, with Mark Duplass and we wanted to work together again. And so he basically said, if you write a script, I’ll produce it for you. I wrote it and we took it to
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Interview: Benoit Jacquot On 3 Hearts And Being Women's Director

Benoit Jacquot started his career as Marguerite Duras' assistant director in the 70s and went on to direct many films with strong female characters. In doing so, he catapulted the careers of many actresses into leading ladies of French cinema, among them Judith Godreche (Ridicule), Virginie Ledoyen (The Beach, 8 Women), Isild Le Besco (Sade, A tout de suite), Sandrine Kiberlain (Seventh Heaven, Apres Vous) . Lately, he has been keeping himself busy with two films out right now: 3 Hearts opening night film for this year's Rendez-vous with French Cinema and his Diary of Chambermaid shown in competition at this year's Berlinale, continuing the international success of Marie Antoinette-intrigue Farewell My Queen (starring Léa Seydoux, Diane Kruger and Ledoyen) a couple years back. Jacquot...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Patrice Leconte: ‘I’m Not a Reporter-style Filmmaker, I Bear Witness to My Emotions, Not to My Time’

Patrice Leconte: ‘I’m Not a Reporter-style Filmmaker, I Bear Witness to My Emotions, Not to My Time’
With a 40-year career, spanning 30 films, Patrice Leconte is one of France’s most versatile and accomplished directors, with credits including cult pics “Monsieur Hire,” “Ridicule” and “The Hairdresser’s Husband.” He delights in shifting genres and filming styles from one project to the next. In 2012 he directed his first animation feature, “The Suicide Shop”, having previously dabbled in animation and cartoons during his teenage years and in his first job as a cartoonist for the Franco-Belgian comics magazine Pilote. His penultimate picture, the romantic drama “A Promise,” starring Alan Rickman and Rebecca Hall, was his first English-language production. His most recent film “Do Not Disturb,” with Christian Clavier and Carole Bouquet, which opened 2015’s UniFrance Rendez-vous with French Cinema on Jan. 15, was shot with a handheld camera.

On January 28, he delivered a masterclass in the Paris Images Pro event – his first masterclass on French soil, having previously participated in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Patrice Leconte on ‘Do Not Disturb,’ Christian Clavier, the Self-Centeredness of Modern Life

Patrice Leconte on ‘Do Not Disturb,’ Christian Clavier, the Self-Centeredness of Modern Life
Bowing Dec. 31 in France, the Wild Bunch-sold “Do Not Disturb,” re-twinning Patrice Leconte and Christian Clavier, the latter hot off “Bad (Serial) Weddings,” looks set to Leconte his best box office in a near-decade, a first-two-weekends 680,897 tix sold – broadly €4.4 million ($5.3 million), for Wild Bunch Distribution. That might be expected. Produced by Olivier Delbosc and Marc Missonnier at Fidelite Films, adapting Florian Zeller’s French stage play, itself inspired by Simon Gray’s “Otherwise Engaged,” first directed by Harold Pinter, “Do Not Disturb” features a strong ensemble – Carole Bouquet (“That Obscure Object of Desire,” ”Wasabi”), Valerie Bonneton (“Eyjafjallajökull”) and Rossy de Palma (“Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown”), for instance. In it, Clavier plays Michel, a well-heeled dentist and jazz buff, who stumbles on a rare find, the original L.P. of a New Orleans jazz session in 1958, called, not coincidentally, “Me, Myself and I.” He settles down in his lavish living room,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Daddy,’ ‘Disturb,’ ‘Discount’ Showcased at UniFrance Rendez-vous

‘Daddy,’ ‘Disturb,’ ‘Discount’ Showcased at UniFrance Rendez-vous
Paris –Pathe’s “Daddy or Mommy,” Wild Bunch’s “Do Not Disturb” and The Other Angle’s “Discount” will compete next week for one of Europe’s most valuable non-official crowns: the UniFrance Paris Rendez-vous Most Popular New Comedy.

Also in the running: Gaumont’s “I Kissed a Girl,” Kinology’s “Caprices,” EuropaCorp’s “Bis” and “Buddy Guards,” Studiocanal’s “Chic!”, Versatile’s “A trois, on y va,” “Valentin, Valentin,” from Sbs Productions, and TF1.’s Intl.’s “Boomerang.”

Having punched a robust first five-day $3.7 million through Jan. 4, Patrice Leconte’s “Do Not Disturb” opens Paris’ 17th UniFrance Rendez-vous with French Cinema, Europe’s biggest film mart after Cannes, Berlin, Venice, San Sebastian and Locarno.

Running Jan. 15-19, and screening an announced 86 French movies, 47 market premieres per UniFrance, the Rendez-vous will unveil a score-or-so of new comedies. With Rdv buzz helping to galvanize boffo sales and even double –or sometimes
See full article at Variety - Film News »

2015 Sundance Film Festival Predictions: Patrick Brice’s The Overnight

2014 saw Patrick Brice officially plant his feet with Craigslist’s ad from hell horror pic Creep (originally titled Peachfuzz) being picked up (by RADiUS) prior to its SXSW premiere and a month after this, he began shooting The Overnight. A 360° switch in genres, set in Los Angeles, this is being proposed as a night to remember between couples, with a rom com quartet of folk in Adam Scott, Taylor Schilling, Jason Schwartzman and Judith Godreche (who we fondly remember from breakout roles in Patrice Leconte’s Ridicule and Cédric Klapisch’s L’Auberge Espagnole). Oddly enough and comparatively, the year ahead might be an even taller order to fill for Brice, with volumes II and III in the Creep series possibly going into production, but for the time being, and according to this article (above photo cred of Schwartzman and Brice in musical harmony) this will aim at both Sundance
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Jack And The Cuckoo-Clock Heart Blu-Ray Review

Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart Blu-Ray Review

There are few movies that are as wild, original, and filled with soul as Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart, and the only problem with that is that it’s going to make you think someone else directed it. (He didn’t.)

Adapted by Mathias Malzieu from his own bestselling novel and the gold-selling album by his band Dionysos, Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart is a magical story that feels like a new breed of myth, and it comes to you through brilliant animation.

Born on the coldest day in the history of the Earth, Jack’s heart is frozen solid. To save his life, midwife Madeleine grafts a tiny cuckoo clock into his chest to take its place. Everything will be fine, she tells him, so long as he follows three rules in order to keep things running smooth – He can never touch the clock’s workings,
See full article at AreYouScreening »

Film Review: 'A Promise'

  • CineVue
★☆☆☆☆It's been almost two decades since idiosyncratic French filmmaker Patrice Leconte delivered a near-masterpiece in the form of 1996's Ridicule, an opulent and hugely absorbing period drama of verbal sparring in the court at Versailles. It's safe to say that A Promise (2013), the director's first English-language foray, won't be knocking that aforementioned feature off the top spot any time soon. This stodgy Euro-pudding (German story, English adaptation, French director) was always going to run the risk of being a little uneven, but the end result is still disappointingly stilted and inert. Leconte directs this early 19th century love triangle with all the weight and depth of a leisurely ITV afternoon drama.
See full article at CineVue »

Awkwardly Scripted, A Promise Is Plagued With Uninspired Performances

Awkwardly Scripted, A Promise Is Plagued With Uninspired Performances
No bodices were harmed in veteran French filmmaker Patrice Leconte's chaste and bloodless English-language debut, a love-triangle costume drama that never sparks the artful sensuality found in his earlier hits like The Girl on the Bridge, Ridicule, or The Hairdresser's Husband.

Perhaps diluted in translation, this awkwardly scripted adaptation of Stefan Zweig's novella Journey into the Past casts Anglo-Saxon actors in Belgium as an austere stand-in for cusp-of-wwi Germany. Recognizing ingenuity and dedication in his newest employee, steelworks baron Karl Hoffmeister (Alan Rickman, stately and bored) quickly promotes modest engineering prodigy Friedrich Zeitz (Richard Madden, a handsome wet noodle) to be his personal secretary.

Herr Hoffmeis...
See full article at Village Voice »

Review: Patrice Leconte's Edgeless Drama 'A Promise' Starring Rebecca Hall

He’s fallen out of favor a bit in the last few years, but there was a time when Patrice Leconte was one of the most popular foreign filmmakers in the U.S. While he was never a favorite with the hipper critics, over the 1990s and early 2000s, films like “Ridicule,” “ The Girl On The Bridge,” “The Man On The Train” and “Intimate Strangers” became staples on the festival circuit, won BAFTAs and Cesars, and became sizeable arthouse hits. But the director’s recent films like “Beauties At War” and “The Suicide Shop” have struggled to find audiences at home and abroad, and so Leconte seems to have made another ploy for a bigger crowd: at the age of 66, he’s made his English-language debut. And with an impressive cast mixing veteran performers with rising stars, and source material from “Letter To An Unknown Woman” author Stefan Zweig, it
See full article at The Playlist »

Venice Review: Patrice Leconte’s ‘A Promise’ Starring Rebecca Hall, Richard Madden & Alan Rickman

He’s fallen out of favor a bit in the last few years, but there was a time when Patrice Leconte was one of the most popular foreign filmmakers in the U.S. While he was never a favorite with the hipper critics, over the 1990s and early 2000s, films like “Ridicule,” “ The Girl On The Bridge,” “The Man On The Train” and “Intimate Strangers” became staples on the festival circuit, won BAFTAs and Cesars, and became sizeable arthouse hits. But the director’s recent films like “Beauties At War” and “The Suicide Shop” have struggled to find audiences at home or abroad, and so Leconte seems to have made another ploy for a bigger crowd: at the age of 66, he’s made his English-language debut. And with an impressive cast mixing veteran performers with rising stars, and source material from “Letter To An Unknown Woman” author Stefan Zweig, it
See full article at The Playlist »

Venice Film Review: ‘A Promise’

Venice Film Review: ‘A Promise’
A French director working with British actors and pre-wwi German setting could theoretically make a film that rises above Europudding mediocrity, but that potential goes unrealized by “A Promise,” Patrice Leconte’s unpromising first foray into English-language filmmaking. Led by a trio of lackluster performances from Alan Rickman, Rebecca Hall and “Game of Thrones” thesp Richard Madden, this awkward, passionless drama conveys neither the sensuality nor the drawn-out sense of longing required by its period tale of a young secretary who falls in love with his employer’s wife. The French-Belgian co-production will rely on high regard for Leconte’s past work to drum up arthouse interest offshore.

Adapted by Leconte and Jerome Tonnerre (who also co-wrote the director’s “My Best Friend” and “Intimate Strangers”) from Stefan Zweig’s posthumously published novel “Journey Into the Past,” the story begins in 1912 Germany, a time and place of rapid industrial change
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Venice Film Festival: Rebecca Hall’s ‘Promise’ Wows Buyers Before Premiere

Venice Film Festival: Rebecca Hall’s ‘Promise’ Wows Buyers Before Premiere
Just ahead of its world premiere at Venice, Patrice Leconte’s ambitious English-language debut, “A Promise,” has already drawn a flurry of buyers.

Paris-based outfit Wild Bunch, which reps the Rebecca Hall starrer in international markets, has closed more than 20 territories with distributors, notably Mars Distribution (France), Japan (Comstock), Australia and N.Z. (Vendetta), Officine Ubu (Italy), Lusomundo (Portugal) and Frenetic (Switzerland).

The pic was co-written by Leconte and Jerome Tonnerre (“Renoir”), adapted from Stefan Zweig’s novella “Journey Into the Past.”

Set in Germany just before Wwi, “A Promise” toplines Hall as the wife an older, wealthy man (Alan Rickman) who falls hopelessly in love with a young and ambitious engineer from a modest background (Richard Madden), who is Rickman’s personal secretary. The pair engage in passionate liaison and when war breaks out, they promise to go on loving each other.

Leconte described the film as “an intimate,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites