IMDb > The Nutty Professor (1996) > Reviews & Ratings - IMDb
The Nutty Professor
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Reviews & Ratings for
The Nutty Professor More at IMDbPro »

Write review
Filter: Hide Spoilers:
Page 1 of 11:[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [Next]
Index 104 reviews in total 

40 out of 48 people found the following review useful:

Commenting on the comment "fatism" below

9/10
Author: zetes from Saint Paul, MN
23 June 2000

As a fat person myself, I encounter prejudice every day. Movies are especially bad, because it is still considered okay to make fun of fat people. Most skinny people just assume that we're lazy. They think that we have the potential to be as thin as is considered "normal," but we just are too lazy to do anything about it. That is absolutely false (not that the skinnies would ever buy that, but I can at least try).

Anyway, to get to The Nutty Professor, I found it to be one of the most sympathetic portrayals of fat people ever put on film. The only one that tops it is James Mangold's Heavy, although the protagonist's weight wasn't all that was harming his well-being.

The Nutty Professor did have some physical comedy involving fat that one could take as funny, but I never felt that the jokes were degrading. The main reason that I feel this was so sympathetic was that, though he experienced life as a skinny stud, he did decide to be a fat man at the end. One can chock this up to formulae, but something that Sherrman Klump said at the end really touched me: "I could try to lose weight, but I'm always going to be a fat man, and you're just going to have to live with that." I think that a film where the screenwriters who were bigoted would have said something like, "I'll lose weight without this stupid formula." That's not what happened, though, and I'm glad for that.

Was the above review useful to you?

25 out of 26 people found the following review useful:

A Real Showcase For Eddie Murphy

8/10
Author: ccthemovieman-1 from United States
2 July 2006

A general nasty tone to this comedy prevented me from rating this a "9" or a "10," but it does have a ton of laughs, courtesy of Eddie Murphy. He's at is best when he's at the dinner table playing everyone but the kid. That is one of the funniest scenes I remember from any 1990s comedy.

His humor is very crude in here (another PG-13 rating that is ludicrous) but very funny in spots, too. With that kind of humor, it's easy to go over the line of "good taste" which he does on occasion. Overall, however, Murphy is remarkable as all these characters. I believe he plays seven in all. This is probably his biggest 'showcase' ever on film, demonstrating his comedic talents.

Even though this has a childlike-romance-type feel to it, and a nice message about bias against fat people, there are so many raunchy and downright nasty lines - mainly at the comedy club or the dinner table - that it's certainly not recommended for kids. This is a LONG way away from the original Jerry Lewis movie. Still....for adults, this movie provides a lot of laughs.

Was the above review useful to you?

18 out of 24 people found the following review useful:

A fine, funny, touching film???

Author: Jim-500 (jpsned@hotmail.com) from Sunderland, MA
22 November 2002

Yes, that's how I feel about it. And no one was more surprised than me.

While I think Eddie Murphy is often hilarious, I don't care so much for his scatological humor. It make me think he wasn't toilet-trained properly.

We get a fair amount of fart jokes in this flick, but they work because they fit in the context of the scenes, and the characters' motivations. They make sense first, THEN are funny, rather than the other way around (or just being silly because no one could think of anything funny to write).

But overriding the gas glee is a thoughtful story about a fat man dealing with his weight and trying to find romance. The special effects that gave Murphy his blubber are truly astounding. It never looks fake. And above all this is the incredible screen chemistry between Murphy's Professor Klump and Jada Pinkett Smith. Smith is always genuine in her interest in Sherman; and his bashfulness and sincerity are truly endearing.

I found this movie to be a pleasant surprise. I think you might, too.

Was the above review useful to you?

13 out of 15 people found the following review useful:

Pure Brilliance from Murphy

Author: (DJBurfitt@hotmail.com)
6 May 2003

In my opinion this is one of the funniest movies you will ever see. This Eddie Murphy at his brilliant best playing seven different characters in the one movie. This is pretty much a Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde routine with Professor Sherman Klump (Murphy) creating a weight loss formula which transforms him into Buddy Love (Murphy). The best scenes of the movie are the dinner scenes at the Klump house where almost every character you see is Eddie Murphy. Very few other actors could have pulled this off. 10/10

Was the above review useful to you?

10 out of 10 people found the following review useful:

big laughs

Author: Special-K88
25 April 2002

In order to gain the affections of a sexy colleague, and more importantly feel better about his overall self-deprecating image, shy, grossly overweight genetics professor Murphy takes an experimental serum that transforms him into a charismatic, testosterone-driven hunk. Things go quickly awry however when he starts to lose his own identity and battle his alter ego for complete control. This Jekyll & Hyde formula is familiar but it's elevated by fresh, consistent laughs, clever and innovative gags, terrific make-up/special effects and a delightful performance from Murphy who's absolutely hysterical as he portrays each member of his family. Lots of fun. ***

Was the above review useful to you?

15 out of 20 people found the following review useful:

Professor Klump wanting to be loved for someone he is not

10/10
Author: angel-41 from Trinidad
10 August 1998

This is the funniest movie I have seen in the longest time. It has become my all time favourite. I do not usually like to look at movies more than once but this movie has me going again and again. I have seen this movie no less than twenty times. I love the dinner scenes, especially Grandma on her recollections of her long lost "relations". It was really a scream at the Scream. I thoroughly enjoyed Reggie. He was unbelievable. So too was his singing. I hope the sequel is just as amusing. I think Eddie is a truly talented Actor in his own rights and I wish him all the best. I would really like to meet him though I hope he is not snubbish as are some actors/resses.

Was the above review useful to you?

11 out of 13 people found the following review useful:

Sheer comedic brilliance

8/10
Author: view_and_review from California
4 January 2007

"The Nutty Professor" is easily deserving of being mentioned with the funniest movies of all time. This movie was nothing short of comedic genius. Eddie Murphy cemented himself as a comedy legend with his performance(s) in "The Nutty Professor". I would go so far as to say that I've never seen two scenes funnier than the two Klump family dinner scenes. For Eddie Murphy to have pulled that off so seamlessly only showed his range and his talent. The two dinner scenes were gut busting hi-la-ri-ous, and what made them so good is that you don't even realize that Eddie Murphy is playing all of those roles. The second dinner scene was particularly hilarious because of Professor Klump; although he never says a word. He was so humiliated by his family's actions that he had the most mortified look on his face, and a couple of times you could even see him attempt to cut his wrist with a butter knife. Priceless!!!

Was the above review useful to you?

9 out of 10 people found the following review useful:

Murphy hilarious in all seven of his characters.

Author: Jerry Jones from United States
5 January 2003

*** 1/2

Starring: Eddie Murphy (x 7), Jada Pinkett Smith, and Larry Miller.

An obese college professor starts to fall for a pretty teacher. He doesn't think that people will like him if he was fat, so he uses a weight-losing potion he created on himself. It works perfectly, and the professor is extremely thin. Now, people treat him differently than when he was fat. But he soon finds out that the "thin" side of him has a mind of its own and is looking to get rid of the "plump" side forever.

Murphy does excellent in all seven roles that are given to him. The scene(s) that really make it funny are the dinner ones. I will say that on a low note, Buddy is a little over the top.

I highly recommend it.

Was the above review useful to you?

12 out of 19 people found the following review useful:

A Man of Substance

Author: Robert J. Maxwell (rmax304823@yahoo.com) from Deming, New Mexico, USA
12 August 2003

The theme of each of us harboring a darker side, just aching to get out and cause mischief, is an old one, but it truly flowered as literature in the age of Freud. Never before had our animal impulses been so -- well, repressed. The legs of easy chairs and sofas were dressed with tiny floor-length skirts. "Legs" were impolite, replaced by "limbs." A "bull" was "a gentleman cow." Virgins could be easily seduced because they didn't know the mechanics of what was going on. Chicken parts became "white meat" and "dark meat" instead of you-know-whats. Stevenson's Jeykll and Hyde were a perfect expression of this duality, the contrast between what we were and what we pretended to be. The theme has been enduringly popular because, to some extent, it's still an appropriate way to interpret culture. And it's also a flexible theme, one that can be changed to suit the times. If Stevenson's story was about sex (as was Wilde's "Portrait of Dorian Gray") then Jerry Lewis's 1963 movie, of which this is a remake, was about subservient conformity. This one is about physical fitness and narcissism.

Never in my life would I have dreamed that someone could remake a Jerry Lewis movie that made Lewis's humor seem subtly elegant, but Murphy has managed to do it. Eddie Murphy's movie is often extremely funny but about as understated as a train wreck. I think the word to describe the hilarious dinner scenes that depend on open flatulence is "raunch." I don't know why we find it funny when someone farts. There are cultures, like the Samoans, in which it is taken for granted as an ordinary biological act and receives no more attention than a sneeze does in our culture. Murphy's entire movie is about at that level of raunchiness, outdoing Lina Wertmuller's "Seven Beauties," which has a corpse farting, outdoing Chaucer -- outdoing everybody.

Murphy has a fantasy in which he is taken to the ER, filled up with gas, and the staff are unable to stop his body from balooning. He swells to a monstrous size, enveloping one of the doctors the way an amoeba absorbs a food particle, smashes upward through the building, strides gigantically through the city streets while people scream and run, reaches a hand through the upper-floor window of a hotel towards Jada Pinkett the way King Kong did with Fay Wray, reaches PAST Pinkett, and two huge sausage-like fingers delicately pluck the leg from a roast chicken next to Pinkett's bed. But that's not enough gigantism. Murphy gives this blimplike figure a spasm of intestinal gas which is released through the streets at hurricane force. A bum tries to strike a match and light a cigarette. The city is vaporized by an explosion the size of a nuclear bomb's. Okay, that's all. I think I'll quit while I'm ahead, something Murphy chose not to do.

Sherman Klump, the fat man and the central figure, is a likable character. One of the reasons for this is that he is one of the few actors who isn't constantly screaming with rage or laughter. He speaks quietly and it's a relief, what with all the bedlam around him. But it's more than that. Murphy actually brings pathos to the role, and without Disneyesque condescension. What I mean is, Murphy ACTS for a change instead of being Murphy. (He doesn't bring much to the alter ego, Buddy Love, except even more Murphy than we're used to.) There is a scene in which Sherman Klump brings his date -- his first date -- to a nightclub and the comic begins insulting Klump because of his weight. Klump goes along with it genially at first but as the comic continues, relentlessly, humiliatingly, Klump's accomodating smile fades and is replaced with an almost infinitely sad resignation. (He's been here before.) He does well by the character in other scenes too.

The subtext is disturbing. I don't know if Murphy realized exactly what he was getting hold of. Smokers having become pariahs, soundly trounced, insulted, and penalized for their weakness, we've been seeking other targets and the searchlight has fallen on the obese, the out of shape. "I can't help it," said the Chairman of a sociology department, "but when I see somebody who is overweight I just think of him as weak." (That's a sociologist talking.) Insurance payments are higher for the overweight. Some airlines now charge double the usual fare because fat people make their seatmates uncomfortable. I've seen bumper stickers in California: "No Fat Chicks," and a red circle with a diagonal stripe drawn through the silhouette of an overweight woman. I won't go into the many studies that have emerged from social psychology in the last decade or so, showing the social handicaps suffered by the overweight. I doubt that Murphy intended this movie to be so, but it is a stinging critique of our pitiless society as well as a very funny movie.

Was the above review useful to you?

12 out of 20 people found the following review useful:

The nutty doc again

Author: Petri Pelkonen (petri_pelkonen@hotmail.com) from Finland
5 March 2000

Eddie Murphy plays an overweight professor Sherman Klump and six other characters in this hilarious comedy.The doc falls in love with his student Carla Purty (Jada Pinkett) and he creates a potion.The potion makes him thinner, more handsome and more annoying Buddy Love.The Nutty Professor is a remake for the 1960's hit comedy with Jerry Lewis.There are some differences in these two movies.In the first version Lewis played a nerd doc and in the remake Murphy plays a fat doc.Both movies are great.Murphy does a great job playing seven characters in the movie.The Nutty Professor just makes you laugh.

Was the above review useful to you?


Page 1 of 11:[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [Next]

Add another review


Related Links

Plot summary Plot synopsis Ratings
Awards External reviews Parents Guide
Official site Plot keywords Main details
Your user reviews Your vote history