Multiplicity (1996) - News Poster

(1996)

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Watch: 5-Minute Supercut Highlights ‘Actors Acting Opposite Themselves’

Every now and again a movie comes along that requires an actor to act opposite themselves, sometimes even in the same shot. At one point it was a technological feat for filmmakers to actually get the actor on the screen twice (notably, Buster Keaton’s famous scene from 1921’s “The Playhouse,” which sees him play every instrument in an orchestra at once via an inventive in-camera technique), but today, with the help of CG, it has become a more readily available trick. Read More: Watch: Get High With This 2-Minute Supercut Of Drugs In Cinema Now, a new supercut edited together by the folks over at Burger Fiction, “Actors Acting Opposite Themselves,” takes us through some of the high-water marks of the trick (and some of the hilarious and infamous lows). Some of the more notable moments include the great Michael Keaton showing off his comical range in “Multiplicity,” the
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Brett Eldredge Premieres 'Drunk on Your Love' Video - and Jokes Arresting His Brother Was His Favorite Part

Brett Eldredge Premieres 'Drunk on Your Love' Video - and Jokes Arresting His Brother Was His Favorite Part
After restraining himself in a straitjacket for his previous video, Brett Eldredge was looking for a little more freedom when it came time to shoot the clip for his next single. "I had that crazy idea for 'Lose My Mind,' not realizing I painted myself into the corner of having to actually wear the straitjacket for the whole shoot," the singer-songwriter tells People with a laugh. "I wanted to do something different for 'Drunk on Your Love' - it's a lighthearted, fun, feel-good song and I wanted the video to reflect that." Directed by Joel Robertson and shot in Charleston,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Brett Eldredge Premieres 'Drunk on Your Love' Video - and Jokes Arresting His Brother Was His Favorite Part

Brett Eldredge Premieres 'Drunk on Your Love' Video - and Jokes Arresting His Brother Was His Favorite Part
After restraining himself in a straitjacket for his previous video, Brett Eldredge was looking for a little more freedom when it came time to shoot the clip for his next single. "I had that crazy idea for 'Lose My Mind,' not realizing I painted myself into the corner of having to actually wear the straitjacket for the whole shoot," the singer-songwriter tells People with a laugh. "I wanted to do something different for 'Drunk on Your Love' - it's a lighthearted, fun, feel good song and I wanted the video to reflect that." Directed by Joel Robertson and shot in Charleston,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

50 forgotten sci-fi films from the 1990s

We may remember Independence Day, The Matrix, The Phantom Menace. But what about these forgotten 90s sci-fi films? And are any worth seeing?

Think back to the science fiction cinema of the 1990s, and some of the decade's biggest box-office hits will immediately spring to mind: The Phantom Menace, Jurassic Park, Independence Day, Men In Black, Armageddon and Terminator 2 were all in the top 20 most lucrative films of the era.

But what about the sci-fi films of the 1990s that failed to make even close to the same cultural and financial impact of those big hitters? These are the films this list is devoted to - the flops, the straight-to-video releases, the low-budget and critically-derided. We've picked 50 live-action films that fit these criteria, and dug them up to see whether they're still worth watching in the 21st century.

So here's a mix of everything from hidden classics to forgettable dreck,
See full article at Den of Geek »

What Happens When Orphan Black Meets Multiplicity?

  • Vulture
What Happens When Orphan Black Meets Multiplicity?
Finally: A fictional universe where accidental clones exist is fully appreciated. Orphan Black has many of us becoming fast fans, but are we all secretly just longing for a sequel to 1996's Multiplicity? When Michael Keaton cloned himself so he could do extra chores and stuff and it all turned into a big mess; we should've learned then and there that no one wants a clone. What they do want, though, is this MultiplicityOrphan Black mash-up:
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Michael Keaton: his 10 greatest screen characters

From Batman to Birdman and everything in between, we take a look at Michael Keaton's top 10 most memorable roles...

Sometimes, the Oscars have a tendency of giving out awards to actors who are seen to have paid their dues, perhaps not for the best performance of that year or even for the particular actor's own best performance, but to recognise past work. Michael Keaton is not the most likely of these, but this could be why some speculated that he was an early favourite for this year's Best Actor award, for his performance in Birdman.

The later frontrunner Eddie Redmayne rightfully and very graciously wound up taking it home for his work as Stephen Hawking in The Theory Of Everything, though Birdman went on to take home the main prize for Best Picture and a number of other major awards.

It would hardly have been a major upset if
See full article at Den of Geek »

Yes! Michael Keaton Says He Wants to Make Beetlejuice Sequel

Yes! Michael Keaton Says He Wants to Make Beetlejuice Sequel
Beetlejuice! Beetlejuice! Beetlejuice! Oscar nominee Michael Keaton says he's ready to get reacquainted with one of his iconic roles. With buzz building for a possible follow-up to Beetlejuice, director Tim Burton's 1988 horror-comedy in which Keaton memorably starred as a manic, demented spirit alongside costars Winona Ryder, Geena Davis and Alec Baldwin, Keaton tells People he's excited about the prospect of reuniting with Burton, who also directed him in two Batman films. "I hope," says the Birdman actor. "We don't know yet." Asked what he found exciting about reteaming with Burton at this point in their respective careers, Keaton says simply,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Yes! Michael Keaton Says He Wants to Make Beetlejuice Sequel

Yes! Michael Keaton Says He Wants to Make Beetlejuice Sequel
Beetlejuice! Beetlejuice! Beetlejuice! Oscar nominee Michael Keaton says he's ready to get reacquainted with one of his iconic roles. With buzz building for a possible follow-up to Beetlejuice, director Tim Burton's 1988 horror-comedy in which Keaton memorably starred as a manic, demented spirit alongside costars Winona Ryder, Geena Davis and Alec Baldwin, Keaton tells People he's excited about the prospect of reuniting with Burton, who also directed him in two Batman films. "I hope," says the Birdman actor. "We don't know yet." Asked what he found exciting about reteaming with Burton at this point in their respective careers, Keaton says simply,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Emotions run high at Santa Barbara tribute to Michael Keaton

  • Hitfix
Emotions run high at Santa Barbara tribute to Michael Keaton
Santa Barbara — Saturday night the Santa Barbara International Film Festival shook things up a bit with the annual Modern Master Award tribute, this year dedicated to "Birdman" star Michael Keaton. Colleagues and co-stars sent pre-recorded messages to honor the actor, emotions ran high at the end of the evening and the fest had a special surprise in store for moderator Leonard Maltin as well. First, the retrospective. It was a typical deep dive into a career, the highlights of which you can read in our recent series of interviews with the actor. Keaton was clearly overwhelmed by seeing things in this context as his "Multiplicity" co-star Andie MacDowell was on hand to present an introductory clip package of career highlights. "I feel like I'm gonna pass out," he said as he took the stage to begin the evening. Maltin noted Keaton's first scene from "Night Shift," as we hear the
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Michael Keaton says he was lucky to be a part of Batmania

  • Hitfix
Michael Keaton says he was lucky to be a part of Batmania
Santa Monica — Michael Keaton has been asked about a sequel to "Beetlejuice" enough times to surely be sick of it by now, because the thing has moved at such a glacial pace there just isn't much to be said. But his work in the original film came at a time when his career was really taking off, and playing in the expressionistic world of Tim Burton in both that film and the first two "Batman" movies was a wholly new and exciting experience for him. In one, he helped build a character from the ground up, while in the other, he found himself at the center of a raging pop culture tempest. Both roles are iconic in their own ways, and looking back, Keaton can — as ever — find nothing but gratitude for getting to be a part of it. "Batman" in particular was a personal landmark, a movie that grabbed
See full article at Hitfix »

Michael Keaton remembers Harold Ramis, tackling Shakespeare, Ron Howard's 'Gung Ho'

  • Hitfix
Michael Keaton remembers Harold Ramis, tackling Shakespeare, Ron Howard's 'Gung Ho'
Santa Monica — Michael Keaton is having the time of his life. Cruising along an awards circuit that has brought him plenty of kudos for his performance in Alejandro González Iñárritu's "Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)" and probably more opportunities to talk about himself than he'd prefer, he seems consistently high on life and not at all phased by the grind. He's not someone who has really sought out this kind of attention and acclaim, often retreating to his ranch in Montana away from the Hollywood fray, but now that he's feeling the love? Let's just say I doubt anyone's having as much fun with all of this than he is. On the eve of this year's Oscar nominations announcement, I met Keaton for coffee and a light lunch at one of his favorite Santa Monica spots to chew on as much of his career and the awards
See full article at Hitfix »

'Groundhog Day's' Harold Ramis to receive WGA Awards lifetime achievement award

  • Hitfix
'Groundhog Day's' Harold Ramis to receive WGA Awards lifetime achievement award
Harold Ramis, the man behind "Ghostbusters" and "Groundhog Day," passed away last February at the age of 69. Like many, the Writers Guild of America hasn't forgotten the impact he made over a 38-year career. The organization announced Tuesday that they will honor the writer/director/actor with the WGA's 2015 Laurel Award for Screenwriting Achievement at the Writers Guild Awards ceremony next month. Ramis' wife, Erica Mann Ramis, and family will accept the award on his behalf. In a release, WGAw Vice President Howard A. Rodman noted, "Harold Ramis changed the face of comedy. His death last year deprived us of his unique way of seeing the world, at once hilarious and wise. From his early work with 'National Lampoon' and 'Sctv' through 'Animal House,' 'Meatballs,' 'Caddyshack' and 'Ghostbusters,' Ramis' voice was strong, clear, outrageous in all the best ways. His unrealized projects
See full article at Hitfix »

Harold Ramis Honored by Writers Guild with Screen Laurel Award

Harold Ramis Honored by Writers Guild with Screen Laurel Award
The Writers Guild of America West has selected the late Harold Ramis as the recipient of its Laurel Award for screenwriting achievement.

The award will be presented at the WGA Awards ceremony on Feb. 14, with Erica Mann Ramis and family accepting.

Harold Ramis changed the face of comedy,” said WGA West VP Howard A. Rodman. “His death last year deprived us of his unique way of seeing the world, at once hilarious and wise. From his early work with National Lampoon and Sctv through ‘Animal House,’ ‘Meatballs,’ ‘Caddyshack’ and ‘Ghostbusters,’ Ramis’ voice was strong, clear, outrageous in all the best ways.”

“His unrealized projects – an adaptation of ‘Confederacy of Dunces,’ a biopic about Emma Goldman – leave us aching with an anticipation that will never be fulfilled,” Rodman added. “And then there’s ‘Groundhog Day,’ one of modern cinema’s few true masterworks, a film that is impeccably crafted, morally astute,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wgaw To Honor The Late Harold Ramis With Screen Laurel Award

  • Deadline
Wgaw To Honor The Late Harold Ramis With Screen Laurel Award
The Writers Guild of America, West has chosen late screenwriter-director-actor-producer Harold Ramis to receive its Laurel Award for Screenwriting Achievement, awarded to a Writers Guild member who has advanced the literature of motion pictures and made outstanding contributions to the profession of the screenwriter. Erica Mann Ramis and family will accept the award on Ramis’ behalf at the Writers Guild Awards ceremony on Saturday, February 14. Harold Ramis passed away on February 24, 2014 at the age of 69. From today’s announcement:

Harold Ramis changed the face of comedy. His death last year deprived us of his unique way of seeing the world, at once hilarious and wise. From his early work with National Lampoon and Sctv through Animal House, Meatballs, Caddyshack, and Ghostbusters, Ramis’ voice was strong, clear, outrageous in all the best ways. His unrealized projects – an adaptation of Confederacy of Dunces, a biopic about Emma Goldman – leave us aching with
See full article at Deadline »

Watch: 'Multiplicity 2: Game of Clones' Trailer Hilariously Swaps Michael Keaton for George R.R. Martin

Multiplicity may not be the most beloved movie Harold Ramis directed, but then again when the competition includes Caddyshack, National Lampoon's Vacation and Groundhog Day, that's less of a knock on Multiplicity and more a testament to the sheer greatness of Ramis' other movies. But still, this delightful '90s comedy is kind of hard to hate thanks to Michael Keaton, Michael Keaton, Michael Keaton and Michael Keaton. If you haven't seen it, Multiplicity stars Michael Keaton as a harried husband who clones himself so that he can catch up on his job, wife, chores and everything else he just doesn't have time for in his busy life. Things get out of hand, however, once the clones start cloning themselves. Moderate hilarity and plenty of misunderstandings...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

Interview: Michael Keaton Goes From Batman to ‘Birdman’

Interview: Michael Keaton Goes From Batman to ‘Birdman’
Like most actors, Michael Keaton claims he doesn’t enjoy watching himself in his own movies. But when it comes to his buzzy starring role in Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu’s “Birdman,” which Fox Searchlight opens in limited release Friday, he can’t stop watching himself — as if in disbelief that it’s really him up there onscreen. “I like this movie so much, I just can’t get enough of it,” he says over a recent lunch at Santa Monica’s Miramar Hotel, the day after he’d seen “Birdman” for the third time, at an Academy screening attended by his old “Batman” sparring partner, Jack Nicholson. “I’m watching this movie and I’m thinking, God, I love this movie. And then I realized: Wait a minute, I’m in this movie!”

Coming from most people, a statement like that would sound like false modesty at best and willful self-delusion at worst,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Michael Keaton Bursts Into Oscar Race with ‘Birdman’

Michael Keaton Bursts Into Oscar Race with ‘Birdman’
Michael Keaton is back, in a big way.

With his new film “Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)” premiering to favorable early buzz at the Venice Film Festival and set to play Telluride this weekend, word is out on the 62-year-old actor’s kinetic, revelatory performance. Variety’s Peter Debruge called it the “comeback of the century” and other rave reviews have begun to trickle online. In a bit of meta casting, Keaton plays Riggan Thomson, an actor famous for once donning a superhero’s cape, now trying to revive his career on Broadway.

Filmmaker Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu is a true actor’s director; his last three films, “21 Grams,” “Babel” and “Biutiful,” all saw actors nominated for Oscars. And Keaton seems certain to continue that trend. Though many names have been in the mix, at this point the only performance that seems like a lock for a nom has been Steve Carell for “Foxcatcher,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: Alejandro G. Iñárritu's 'Birdman' opens Venice with a sure-fire Oscar bet

  • Hitfix
Review: Alejandro G. Iñárritu's 'Birdman' opens Venice with a sure-fire Oscar bet
Venice - Truth or dare? This is a game played by two characters in magnificently acidic metatextual comedy "Birdman." It's also the film as a three-word question. Truth or dare? Real stage actor or star? You can have your artistic integrity, or you can have a hit. You can go Method, or you can really fly. You can be Riggan Thomson (Michael Keaton), or you can be Birdman (Riggan Thomson). Initially, "Birdman" poses as a trenchant critique of the seemingly endless parade of men in capes that is the summer blockbuster season (Michael Fassbender and Robert Downey Jr. are name-checked as fine actors currently otherwise occupied), but it's actually rather more nuanced than that. The values of the sober-minded art espoused by a poisonous critic (Lindsay Duncan) and the untrustworthy joys of escapist cinema are both probed and prodded in this film. It's impossible for a film featuring the nightmare
See full article at Hitfix »

Four Weddings and a Funeral anniversary: What happened to the cast?

Four Weddings and a Funeral anniversary: What happened to the cast?
Has it really been 20 years? We hadn't noticed. Prepare to feel old, because this week romantic comedy classic Four Weddings and a Funeral celebrates a landmark anniversary.

The Richard Curtis-penned film delivered exactly what its title promised and so much more. It was funny, charming and packed with brilliant performances from a stellar Brit cast. Without it Hugh Grant would never have hit the Hollywood A-list and Wet Wet Wet wouldn't have spent what felt like an eternity at the top of the UK singles chart.

But what are the cast up to two decades on? We take a look at the key players then and now below...

Hugh Grant

Hugh Grant was a respected supporting actor in the Brit film industry prior to Four Weddings thanks to roles in Remains of the Day and Sirens. Things changed overnight after his role as the ever-so-British and lovelorn Charles.

Leading
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Michael Keaton pays tribute to 'Multiplicity' director Harold Ramis on 'Letterman'

  • Hitfix
Michael Keaton pays tribute to 'Multiplicity' director Harold Ramis on 'Letterman'
Tributes have been flowing in for the late, great Harold Ramis since the filmmaker and comedian died late last month at the age of 69 (did you catch Bill Murray's shout-out at the Oscars?), and "Multiplicity" star Michael Keaton added his voice to the chorus on "David Letterman" last night by paying homage to an "easygoing" man he described as "one of the truly nicest guys you've ever met." In the process he relates a great story from the set that demonstrates just how relaxed Ramis (a practicing Buddhist) really was - even in the midst of some complex technical conundrums on the set of the effects-heavy 1996 comedy. Follow Riot on Twitter
See full article at Hitfix »
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